BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Monitoring and Managing Sea-Level Rise Impacts on Tidal Marshes in the San Francisco Estuary

Once not all that long ago, the prevailing thought was that if tidal marsh remnants were protected and carefully managed, they would persist for the foreseeable future, providing sanctuary for tidal marsh species that are at-risk due to habitat loss and fragmentation. However, a series of recent independent studies have demonstrated that mature marshes are vulnerable to marsh drowning due […]

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BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Science-Based Regulatory Permitting for Resilient Tidal Habitat Restorations

The permitting of tidal restoration projects is most often a costly and time-consuming process, causing substantial delays in implementation while endangered and threatened species remain at risk. Given the accelerating nature of sea level rise, restoration of tidal habitats that are resilient to climate change should be implemented on a large scale and soon to have any chance of contributing […]

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BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Emergent groundwater and sea level rise in the San Francisco Bay Area: the silent and largely unknown underground threat

The threats that sea level rise poses to coastal development from direct inundation are better understood than the threats due to rising groundwater levels. Rising sea level will raise the level of groundwater in coastal aquifers, resulting in damage to buried infrastructure and increased potential for flooding from groundwater inundation. Researchers at UC Berkeley and Silvestrum Climate Associates have performed […]

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Tidal marshes: Adapting to sea level rise, carbon sequestration

Dr. Jim Morris on the mechanisms of how tidal marshes keep pace with sea level rise, and Dr. John Callaway with research on carbon sequestration in the San Francisco Bay’s tidal wetlands Back in the late 1800s as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta was being reclaimed for agriculture, a somewhat parallel process was happening to the shoreline of the San Francisco […]

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Projecting inundation in the San Francisco Bay: Sea level and tides

UC Berkeley’s Dr. Mark Stacey with the latest research on the impacts of sea level rise on the Bay Area and possible responses With sea level projected to rise at least one meter by 2100, possible even more, much needed attention is being paid on how to prepare the San Francisco Bay’s extensive shoreline to adapt to significant amounts of […]

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