DAILY DIGEST, 4/15: Klamath Project to receive historically low water allocation; Central Coast’s Ag order 4.0 adoption deadline this Friday; New front in Santa Barbara County’s pot wars; Permit terms might kill Huntington Beach desal project; and more …


On the calendar today …

LEG HEARING: The Senate Committee on Natural Resources and Water meets upon adjournment of the Agriculture Committee.  Bills to be heard include water innovation, fish & wildlife bills, habitat restoration, Salton Sea, Delta Independent Science Board, and more.  Click here for the agenda and remote access instructions.

PUBLIC MEETING: Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program Stakeholder Meeting from 10am to 12pm.  The goal is to provide open forum for communication between water board staff, agricultural coalitions, environmental justice groups, and other interested parties in the Central Valley.  Agenda items include concise updates from water quality coalitions and environmental justice groups and a focused discussion on CV-SALTsClick here for a full agenda and remote access instructions.

FREE WEBINAR:  Sustainable Silicon Valley: Meet the regulators from 10am to 11:30am.  Tom Mumley is the Assistant Executive Officer at San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board. Dave Smith is the Assistant Director at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 9. While they were not Beatle-era Pop Stars, they are two guys very much worth hearing if you care about the Bay Area and California water.  Click here to register.

FREE WEBINAR: Rebuilding Forests After a Fire from 11am to 12pm.  In this webinar, Southwest Climate Adaptation Science Center (CASC) researchers will describe recently published research where they estimate seed production and postfire regeneration of conifers in low-elevation California forests to help managers identify where management may be needed to encourage forest recovery after large wildfires. The researchers will share a tool they created to aid managers in selecting which areas will be best for replanting after megafires. The Postfire Spatial Conifer Restoration Planning Tool (POSCRPT) predicts the probability of postfire conifer regeneration. The tool is designed to simplify the process of predicting postfire conifer regeneration under different precipitation and seed production scenarios.  Click here to register.

FREE WEBINAR: Wetland Restoration Without the Use of Plastics from 11am to 12pm.  In this webinar we will discuss a few of our projects in mangrove, oyster reef, salt marsh and SAV restoration. We will explain the design and failures and successes of our products and projects. The goal of the webinar is to give you an insight in what kind of biodegradable solutions exist and how you can successfully apply them in the field.  Click here to register.

SPECIAL EVENT: Delta Lead Scientist “Ask me anything” at 12pm on Instagram.   Join Delta Lead Scientist Dr. Laurel Larsen and Deputy Executive Officer for Planning & Performance Jeff Henderson in conversation about building resilience through diversity in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta science.   Drop your questions in the comments for Laurel and Jeff to tackle one-by-one.  Instagram Live:@deltastewardshipcouncil

Dear readers:  Regional news takes the lead today as it has the most interesting stories.  Scroll down for statewide and national news.

In regional water news and commentary today …

Reclamation announces Klamath Project 2021 Temporary Operations Plan; Assistance to basin stakeholders

Today, the Bureau of Reclamation released the Klamath Project 2021 Temporary Operations Plan, which was developed in response to consecutive years of drought conditions in the Klamath Basin, including the lowest historical inflows on record into Upper Klamath Lake this year.  Reclamation also announced $15 million in immediate aid to the Klamath Project through the Klamath Project Drought Relief Agency, an additional $3 million in technical assistance to Tribes for ecosystem activities in the basin, as well as funding for groundwater monitoring in the basin. These efforts supplement additional funding provided by other Department of the Interior bureaus and is consistent with the activities outlined in the April 8 joint Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Agriculture statement relating to drought. … ”  Read more from the Bureau of Reclamation here: Reclamation announces Klamath Project 2021 Temporary Operations Plan; Assistance to basin stakeholders

Klamath Project to receive historically low water allocation

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation delivered a gut-punch to Klamath Project irrigators Wednesday, announcing a historically low water allocation as the basin struggles with extreme drought. Farms and ranches in the Project will receive an initial allocation of just 33,000 acre-feet — the lowest total since the shutdown of 2001 and barely 8% of historical demand. That is dramatically lower than the bureau’s original estimate of 130,000 acre-feet based on hydrological conditions at the beginning of March. Since then, snowpack in the Klamath Basin has dropped to 72% of normal for the water year dating back to Oct. 1, and precipitation is just 67% of normal. ... ” Read more from the Capital Press here:  Klamath Project to receive historically low water allocation

SEE ALSO:

Born with this: The last days of the Klamath River dams.

The Hornbrook Chevron looks like any other place to buy gas, snacks and a fishing license along the I-5 corridor in Northern California. It’s also one of the few businesses still standing in Hornbrook, California (population around 200). For a few hours though, it comes to life because the Chevron parking lot is the unofficial rendezvous point for fly-fishing trips on the upper Klamath River. It’s here that guides meet anglers, coffee chases donuts and steelhead strategies hatch.  It’s here, on a near-perfect fall morning, I meet up with Patagonia ambassador and California Trout (CalTrout) videographer Mikey Wier and his colleague Andrew Braugh. … ”  Read more from Patagonia here: Born with this: The last days of the Klamath River dams.

Sacramento: Recreational waterways can still be dangerous despite drought conditions, officials warn

The Yuba Water Agency manages water storage and deliveries to downstream customers while having a hand in preserving fish habitats and recreational areas.  Currently, the agency has already begun doubling its reservoir releases at a time when visitors to the river are also expected to go up.  Due to the time of year, those releases from upstream reservoirs are dictated by irrigation needs of downstream growers.  “We’re going to experience some of the warmest weather we’ve had all year this weekend,” said Willie Whittlesey, general manager for the agency. “We have this COVID fatigue that’s been going on and people are going to want to get out.” … ”  Read more from KTXL here: Sacramento: Recreational waterways can still be dangerous despite drought conditions, officials warn

Santa Rosa cuts back recycled water allocations to agriculture by two-thirds

At a time of year when farmers have counted on tapping into recycled water to get them through the hotter months, water officials in Santa Rosa have severely cut back the amount of water they will deliver. They blame the drought.  “We’ve never seen it like this before,” said Elise Howard, spokeswoman for the city’s Water Reuse department.  Starting Monday, the city will cut its allocations to its agricultural customers to a third of what they normally get. Those 60 users will share 600 million gallons of recycled water. In the average water year, the city doles out 1.7 billion gallons. … ”  Read more from the North Bay Journal here:  Santa Rosa cuts back recycled water allocations to agriculture by two-thirds

West Marin water contamination prompts ranch inspections

The state plans to inspect three dairy ranches in the Point Reyes National Seashore after independent water quality tests conducted in nearby creeks and lagoons earlier this year found E. coli bacteria concentrations up to 40 times higher than state health standards.  The San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board plans to inspect Kehoe Dairy, McClure Dairy and R&J McClelland Dairy, which are located near Kehoe Creek and waterways that flow into Abbotts Lagoon in the northern region of the national seashore. The Western Watersheds Project environmental group tested for bacteria and nutrients at these waterways on Jan. 27 and 28. The tests found E. coli bacteria levels up to 40 times the state health standard at Kehoe Lagoon and up to 20 times at a tributary to Abbotts Lagoon; total fecal coliform bacteria up to five times the state health standard at South Kehoe Creek; and enterococci bacteria up to 300 times the state health standard at Kehoe Lagoon. … ”  Read more from the Marin Indendent Journal here:  West Marin water contamination prompts ranch inspections

Bay environmental groups hail Redwood City salt ponds decision

Bay Area environmental groups are celebrating a decision by an affiliate of Cargill to withdraw its appeal of a federal judge’s finding that Redwood City salt ponds are protected by the Clean Water Act. While the withdrawal does not mean development is prohibited it does make it more difficult, as the federal act requires permits be issued before any dredging or filling of the salt ponds, a 1,365-acre area adjacent to the San Francisco Bay filled with tidal pools, marshland and commercial salt mining operations. … ”  Read more from the San Mateo Daily Journal here:  Bay environmental groups hail Redwood City salt ponds decision

RELATED NOTE:  In case you were wondering … What is up with those crazy colors around the edges of the Bay?!?, Salty Dave’s Wetland blog has the answer.

‘A scary scenario’: Water bills in San Jose headed for costly, decade-long spike starting this summer

Residents across San Jose can expect to see their water bills increase in the coming months no matter what company they get their water from — a trend that could continue year after year for the next decade.  Santa Clara Valley Water District, the region’s wholesale water provider, plans to raise its rates by up to 9.6% each year for the next eight years, followed by an 8.7% jump the following two years. The monthly rate increases would equate to an approximate $4.50 to $5.10 increase per month for customers, according to the water district. ... ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here: ‘A scary scenario’: Water bills in San Jose headed for costly, decade-long spike starting this summer

Central California: Down to the wire: Ag order 4.0 adoption deadline this Friday

A final decision on the pending Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program known as Ag Order 4.0 is expected by Friday, April 16. Producers have anxiously been monitoring the development of the program from the Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board. Stakeholders have repeatedly provided feedback on the proposal, detailing the challenges it would create within agriculture. As the adoption deadline quickly approaches, industry members still have concerns about multiple provisions of the measure. … ”  Read more from Ag Net West here: Down to the wire: Ag order 4.0 adoption deadline this Friday

Judge tells Monterey County to go back to the drawing board on Cal Am desal approval

Monterey County must rescind all approvals of California American Water’s proposed desalination project, per an order from a Monterey County Superior Court judge who earlier this year found the county violated the California Environmental Quality Act by approving the project without identifying a water source.  The ruling was handed down April 3 by Judge Lydia Villarreal, who on Jan. 21 granted in part—and denied in part—a writ requested by the Marina Coast Water District regarding the 2019 approvals of the desal plant component of Cal Am’s Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project. On Jan. 29, in response to Villarreal’s first order, Cal Am and the county filed a letter with the court requesting clarification or a limited writ on the issue. … ”  Read more from Monterey County Weekly here: Judge tells Monterey County to go back to the drawing board on Cal Am desal approval

New front in Santa Barbara County’s pot wars

Santa Barbara County’s most depleted water basin, the Cuyama Valley, is fast becoming the latest battleground in the fight over how — and whether — to address the negative impacts of the lucrative cannabis industry on farming and residential communities.  The giant groundwater basin underlying this sparsely populated, heavily farmed, economically depressed valley is one of California’s 21 most critically over-drafted basins and the only one outside the Central Valley. For 75 years, the Cuyama Valley has been a mecca for water-intensive farming on an industrial scale — first, alfalfa, and now, carrots, a $69 million annual crop. Now there’s a newcomer on the block. More than 740 acres of outdoor cannabis cultivation has been proposed for the Cuyama Valley and is under review for zoning permits, county planners say. The industry is poised to drop new straws into the declining basin, where some of the well water is 1,000 feet deep and 30,000 years old — so old, it’s known as “fossil water.” … ”  Read more from the Santa Barbara Independent here: New front in Santa Barbara County’s pot wars

Permit terms might kill Poseidon desalination proposal in Huntington Beach

Recommended terms for a permit to build Poseidon Water’s controversial desalination plant in Huntington Beach would make it impossible to get financing for the $1.4 billion project, according to the developer.  Regulators question that claim, although they acknowledge that the requirements could create financing obstacles.  Poseidon’s three-year effort to win a permit from the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board is scheduled to culminate within the next month, with a vote as soon as the board’s April 23 meeting. Additional meetings have been penciled in for April 29 and May 13, if needed, as previous deliberations and public hearings have often stretched longer than anticipated. ... ”  Read more from the OC Register here:  Permit terms might kill Poseidon desalination proposal in Huntington Beach

Editorial: Coming drought should prod OK of desal plant

Gavin Newsom this week traveled to Lake Oroville to sign a half-billion-dollar wildfire prevention bill. During his press conference, he pointed to falling water levels at the reservoir and noted that drought conditions increase the wildfire risk. The governor promised “many different announcements” regarding the looming water crisis, as news reports note.  We eagerly await those coming announcements, but urge Newsom to make one in particular. He has long supported a desalination project at the site of a former electrical plant on the Huntington Beach coast. He needs to publicly reiterate his support – and oppose a plan to saddle it with permitting conditions that render its financing infeasible. … ”  Read more from the OC Register here: Editorial: Coming drought should prod OK of desal plant

San Diego report looks at water quality issues in local watersheds

The City of San Diego’s Public Utilities Department has completed the 2020 Watershed Sanitary Survey, which evaluates any potential water quality issues at the source and will be used as a basis for future watershed management and planning efforts. A watershed is an area of land that drains water into a specific body of water. Everything that is on the land, whether a natural feature or a human activity, is part of the watershed. ... ”  Read more from San Diego Community News here:  New City report looks at water quality issues in local watersheds

End may be near for Ocean Beach Pier, report says

An alarming city report is making the case that the beloved Ocean Beach pier may soon be history. The pier has suffered major damage during winter storms and has been closed since January.  “Seeing it closed is nothing new,” said Ocean Beach resident Mark-Elliott Lugo, “but the prospect that it might be demolished is devastating.”  That prospect is outlined in a 2019 pier inspection the city released this month. ... ”  Read more from Channel 10 here:  End may be near for Ocean Beach Pier, report says

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In commentary today …

Raising Shasta Dam threatens McCloud River, sacred tribal lands and salmon

Chief Caleen Sisk, spiritual leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, writes: “Earlier this week, American Rivers released a list of the nation’s most endangered rivers. California’s McCloud River is included because of the federal government’s proposal to raise the height of Shasta Dam.  That proposal is a continuation of a long and shameful history of attacks on the Winnemem Wintu Tribe. Fortunately, Deb Haaland, our nation’s first Native American Secretary of the Interior, has an opportunity to point the federal government toward justice for the river and my people.  The Winnemem Wintu name means “middle water people” in our language – a reference to the McCloud River.  The river and our salmon – winter run Chinook – define our existence, shape our spiritual practices and provided us with food for millennia. Because of this connection, Shasta Dam looms over the river – and our tribe – as an ongoing threat. … ”  Read more from Cal Matters here: Raising Shasta Dam threatens McCloud River, sacred tribal lands and salmon

Editorial: If California is America’s climate leader, we’re all in trouble

The San Francisco Chronicle editorial board writes, “As the latest evidence of extended drought and extreme wildfire danger confirms, California’s climate is changing quickly. Its policy on burning planet-warming fuels — not so much.  A state Senate bill to ban hydraulic fracturing and otherwise restrict oil and gas extraction died in its first committee Tuesday, with Gov. Gavin Newsom and three Democratic lawmakers withholding support. The defeat came the week after an Assembly committee held up a bill to increase offshore wind energy production, which California, in contrast to several East Coast states, has yet to substantially support. All told, it’s been a rough month for any credible claim to climate leadership in California. … ”  Read more from the SF Chronicle here: Editorial: If California is America’s climate leader, we’re all in trouble

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In California water news today …

Why Wall Street investors’ trading California water futures is nothing to fear – and unlikely to work anyway

Water is one of the world’s most vital resources.  So is there reason to freak out now that profit-hungry hedge funds and other investors can trade it like a barrel of oil or shares of Apple?  That’s exactly what CME Group recently did in California when it launched the world’s first futures market for water in December 2020. Put simply, a futures market lets people place bets on the future price of water.  Some people worry Wall Street’s involvement in trading water will disenfranchise the water rights of rural communities and lead to more scarcity of an already dwindling resource, thus driving up the price everyone pays. … While there are real risks, we think they’re misunderstood and overblown. And anyway, very few are actually trading water futures. ... ”  Read more from The Conversation here:  Why Wall Street investors’ trading California water futures is nothing to fear – and unlikely to work anyway

Veles Weekly Water Report: Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) at 37.33% of 20 year average

The Veles Weekly Report provides analysis around the technical and hydrologic factors that are moving water prices, as well as a comprehensive look at the latest news in water markets.

Click here to read/download the Veles Weekly Water Report.

Drought emergency? Newsom disagrees with valley lawmakers

Governor Gavin Newsom has indicated there is no intention of declaring a drought emergency despite a request from lawmakers. Nearly a dozen legislators sent a letter to Governor Newsom detailing the need for action in requesting a drought declaration. The bipartisan group of lawmakers says the declaration is needed early on to better navigate the challenges drought conditions present.  “In light of the recent water allocation announcement to California farmers and growers, we are writing to share our concerns and respectfully request that your administration take steps to address this pending statewide emergency,” the letter states. … ”  Read more from Ag Net West here: Drought emergency? Newsom disagrees with valley lawmakers

Congressman David G. Valadao demands Governor Newsom urgently issue statewide declaration of emergency due to severe drought conditions

Today, Congressman David G. Valadao and the entire California Republican delegation sent a letter to Governor Newsom urgently requesting a statewide declaration of emergency for the state of California due to the severe drought conditions.  “It is not a secret that we find ourselves dealing yet again with a major drought,” said Congressman Valadao. “It is imperative we do all we can as elected leaders to ensure our constituents, and the communities they live in, have access to the resources they need during this time, namely water. In order for all of us affected by this critical situation to get through it, we need the state government to be willing to help out as well. We cannot rely on the federal government alone. Please step up to the challenge and provide this designation so our farmers, agriculture workers, and communities can have some certainty and stability in an otherwise tumultuous and scary time.”  Read the letter at Congressman Valado’s office here: Congressman David G. Valadao demands Governor Newsom urgently issue statewide declaration of emergency due to severe drought conditions

5 things you need to know about federal drought aid in California

Stop if you’ve heard this before: California is in the grip of a severe drought. Again. Now the federal government is stepping in to help.   To assist California, which is the nation’s largest food supplier, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently declared a drought disaster for 50 counties. That makes growers throughout the state who have been struggling with parched conditions eligible to seek federal loans.  “This declaration emphasizes the devastating and far-reaching impact of climate change on the agricultural producers that feed and power America,” Under Secretary of Agriculture Gloria Montaño Greene said in an emailed statement. … ”  Read more from Cal Matters here: 5 things you need to know about federal drought aid in California

Bill Dodd’s water bill affordability legislation moves through California State Senate

Legislation from Sen. Bill Dodd — who represents Yolo County in the California state Senate — to help hundreds of thousands of Californians who have fallen behind on their water bills has cleared a key committee hurdle.  “All Californians must have access to water, regardless of their income level or economic status,” Dodd stated. “Many people are at risk of being denied this essential service, in part because of rising water rates but also because the pandemic has left so many people unemployed. My legislation will ensure low-income customers aren’t cut off and get the financial help they need to keep the water turned for their families.” … ”  Read more from the Daily Democrat here: Bill Dodd’s water bill affordability legislation moves through California State Senate

Congressman David G. Valadao cosponsors resolution supporting the Navigable Waters Protection Rule

Today, Congressman David G. Valadao signed on as an original co-sponsor of a resolution to support the Navigable Waters Protection Rule. This rule revised the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule that imposed unnecessarily burdensome regulations on farms and businesses. The resolution, introduced today by Representative Mariannette Miller-Meeks (R-IA), also expresses that clean water is a national priority. … “As a lifelong farmer, I know firsthand the challenges government overreach places on the day-to-day operations of farms and businesses,” said Congressman Valadao. “It is critical Congress affirms the importance of prioritizing clean water and defends the Navigable Waters Protection Rule. This commonsense rule protects the quality of American waters and lands while ensuring the prosperity of farms and businesses.” … ”  Read more at Congressman Valadao’s website here:  Congressman David G. Valadao cosponsors resolution supporting the Navigable Waters Protection Rule

April California Fish and Game Commission recap

At its April meeting, the California Fish and Game Commission acted on several issues affecting California’s natural resources. The following are just a few items of interest from yesterday’s meeting. … The Commission received one-year status review reports on petitions to list three species – Clara Hunt’s milkvetch, upper Klamath-Trinity River spring Chinook salmon and northern California summer steelhead. The Commission will consider listing these species under the California Endangered Species Act at its June meeting. ... ”  Read more from the Department of Fish & Wildlife here: April California Fish and Game Commission recap

California Dreaming: Artificial intelligence and robots are helping farmers prepare for climate change crisis

If you look at your plate, chances are what you are eating comes from California.  The Golden State is the sole producer of crops like garlic, olives, peaches and almonds and the leading producer of strawberries, lettuce and grapes for wine.  But many of these crops are being threatened by climate change and rising temperatures.”In the Salinas Valley, a lot of our crops are extremely heat sensitive like lettuces, leafy greens and some berries. If we start seeing changes in spikes of heat or spikes of frost, we’re going to see problems in being able to produce some of these crops,” said Norm Groot, executive director of the Monterey County Farm Bureau. … ”  Read more from ABC 7 here:  California Dreaming: Artificial intelligence and robots are helping farmers prepare for climate change crisis

What the megadrought in the West means for wildfire season

Just as the freshly vaccinated start to resume barbecues and vacation travel in the coming months, wildfires are likely to force residents of Western states back inside.  The warning signs are written in the parched landscape from New Mexico to California. This time last year, 27 percent of the West was in drought — now that has risen to 76 percent, turning forests into matchsticks.  With the pandemic dominating headlines, the severe drought has gotten little attention. “This one threatens to catch people by surprise who are exhausted by the events of the past year,” said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California Los Angeles. ... ”  Read more from Vox here:  What the megadrought in the West means for wildfire season

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Along the Colorado River …

Lake Powell could hit near-record lows from drought

In cruising Lake Powell this year, as people explore canyons and take in the beauty of the rock formations, they’ll also see first-hand what extreme drought looks like.  They could come across previously submerged trees standing bare out-of-water. Or maybe they’ll notice the “bathtub ring” lining the canyon walls, where the water used to sit. Some lucky groups might even find shipwrecked boats revealed on the shore. … ”  Read more from Fox 13 here: Lake Powell could hit near-record lows from drought

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In national water news today …

POLITICO Q&A: Radhika Fox, acting head of EPA’s water office

Radhika Fox, a former executive for a nonprofit water advocacy group and water utility official, is leading the Biden administration’s work to incorporate environmental justice into EPA’s water work and chart a course to reverse a litany of Trump-era rollbacks.  She comes to the role with a deep history in equity work and water infrastructure advocacy — a focus that she’s already brought to bear in helping to shape President Joe Biden’s call to remove all lead piping from drinking water systems under his massive infrastructure proposal, and in launching a review of the Trump administration’s overhaul of the regulation governing lead levels in drinking water. ... For now, Fox is principal deputy administrator of the water office, but during a virtual event on Monday following Vice President Kamala Harris’ visit to a water treatment plant in Oakland, Calif., EPA Administrator Michael Regan called her the “perfect person for this job at this moment in this time,” adding to speculation that she could be nominated to the assistant administrator post. …”  Continue reading at Politico here:  POLITICO Q&A: Radhika Fox, acting head of EPA’s water office  (Follow up note: Biden has nominated Ms. Fox to be Assistant Administrator of Water at the EPA.)

Georgia wins Supreme Court source water battle with Florida

In the decisive culmination to a years-long legal battle over source water between Florida and Georgia, the nation’s highest court has sided unanimously with the Peach State.  “The U.S. Supreme Court won’t force Georgia to curb its water usage, a defeat for downstream Florida in the two states’ long legal war over limited resources,” Bloomberg Law reported. “The justices issued their opinion … rejecting Florida’s plea for an order that would ensure more freshwater flows to the state’s wild oyster population along the Gulf Coast. Florida has hit repeated walls in its legal effort to protect the industry and the area’s broader ecosystem.” … ”  Read more from Water Online here:  Georgia wins Supreme Court source water battle with Florida

Study links meat-based diets to water scarcity

The American diet is supported by a food supply chain leaving behind a massive carbon footprint, and meat heavy diets in particular leave an outsized mark. A new study released Thursday shows the food on people’s plates is also depleting water supplies.  As more Americans and U.S. restaurants adopt plant-based menus, much attention is given to the greenhouse gases spewed into the atmosphere by the supply chain supporting meat-based diets.   But less is known about the impact on water, which can become scarce mainly at the local level whereas greenhouse gases impact global climate.  U.S.-based researchers from the University of Michigan and Tulane University tackled that question, examining the water scarcity footprints — akin to a carbon footprint, which measures greenhouse gas output — of 160 popular crops in the domestic supply chain and their impacts on watershed levels. … ”  Read more from the Courthouse News Service here: Study links meat-based diets to water scarcity

USGS Landsat satellites enable google to portray global change

USGS Landsat satellite data and imagery are the key foundation for the newly released Google Earth 3D Timelapse tool. The upgraded Timelapse presents a global, zoomable time-lapse video of the planet from 1984 to 2020. The USGS, along with NASA, the European Commission, and the European Space Agency, has been critical in the provision of imagery for this new version of Google Earth Timelapse that shows visual evidence of global changes spanning nearly 40 years.  In the biggest update to Google Earth since 2017, you can now see our planet in an entirely new dimension: time. With Timelapse in Google Earth, 20 million satellite photos from the past 37 years have been embedded into Google Earth, allowing users to explore changes to our planet’s surface over time. Now anyone can watch time unfold across the globe and witness nearly four decades of planetary change. … ”  Read more from the USGS here: USGS Landsat satellites enable google to portray global change

The Dead Sea is dying. Drinking water is scarce. Jordan faces a climate crisis

The first time people here saw a sinkhole, they thought a small asteroid had slammed into the Dead Sea’s salt-encrusted shore.  Then others appeared.  One swallowed the edge of a state-owned building. Another opened near a house and forced the family to move. Worried farmers scanned their fields and abandoned their harvests. At one point, a chunk of highway collapsed, disappearing several stories deep and leaving a lone PVC pipe that ran like a high-wire over the crater.  Finally, the residents of Ghor Haditha realized, the problem was literally beneath their feet, a symptom of the Dead Sea’s death and a disturbing measure of the parched land Jordan has become. ... ”  Read more from the LA Times here: The Dead Sea is dying. Drinking water is scarce. Jordan faces a climate crisis

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Today’s featured article …

DELTA STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL: 2022 Central Valley Flood Protection Plan update, Recreation and tourism in the Delta

At the March meeting of the Delta Stewardship Council, the councilmembers were briefed on the 2022 on the Central Valley Flood Protection Plan and on the update to the recreation and tourism chapter of the Delta Protection Commission’s Economic Sustainability Plan.

Click here to read this article.

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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