On the calendar this evening …

Source to Sea: Klamath science episode at 5pm

After years of advocacy and leadership from local tribes and their partners, the Klamath River is at last on the brink of the largest dam removal project in U.S. history. Join us for this special story of tribal and river communities coming together to save a river basin and restore critical salmon runs along the California and Oregon border.  Presented by Rivers of Change.  Click here to register.

In California water news this weekend …

Water district fires nearly all of its employees after they refuse to follow board’s illegal votes

A water district serving 25 cities and 1.6 million residents in southeast Los Angeles County, already waging a battle with customers and the state Legislature over its future, has fired nearly two-thirds of its employees in a last-ditch effort to stabilize district finances.  The budget cuts, initially crunched together by the district’s board and its newly hired general manager without any guidance from an accountant, decimated the scandal-plagued Central Basin Municipal Water District’s organizational chart, removing every department head, most of its engineers and its entire water resources department all at once. … ” Read more from the San Gabriel Valley Tribune here:  Water district fires nearly all of its employees after they refuse to follow board’s illegal votes

Consultants list 10 lessons learned over 5 years of SGMA implementation

California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) is a complex program with a new language that must be mastered by consultants, basin managers, and stakeholders alike. When California first embarked upon the SGMA journey five years ago, there was a lot of trepidation about implementing this bold and untested groundwater management program. M&A’s SGMA team has worked on 13 Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs), including three GSPs submitted in January 2020. It hasn’t always been easy, and there have been plenty of bumps along the way, but we’ve learned a lot in those five years, and we are happy to share some of what we learned. ... ”  Continue reading at Montgomery & Associates here: Keep calm and SGMA on

AGs challenge trump weakening of ‘Magna Carta’ of environmental law

Challenging the Trump administration’s revamp of a bedrock environmental law, 23 attorneys general sued the White House on Friday to block changes that will make it easier to push through major projects with less extensive environmental reviews and public input.  “This is yet another effort by the Trump administration to undermine the foundation of our laws to protect our environment and public health,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said during a virtual press conference Friday. … ”  Read more from the Courthouse News Service here:  AGs challenge trump weakening of ‘Magna Carta’ of environmental law

CA Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot on the Governor’s Water Resilience Portfolio

Water is central to nearly everything we value in California. Healthy communities, economies, farms, ecosystems and cultural traditions depend on steady supplies of safe water. Those values are increasingly at risk as California confronts more extreme droughts and floods, rising temperatures, overdrafted groundwater basins, aging infrastructure and other challenges magnified by climate change. For some of California’s most vulnerable populations, the risks are particularly acute – a reality magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic and the critical need for clean and abundant water to reduce spread of the virus and protect public health. Recognizing the need for action, Governor Gavin Newsom last year directed state agencies to develop recommendations to meet these challenges and enable water security for all Californians. After two rounds of public input, the Governor on July 28 released a final Water Resilience Portfolio, the Administration’s blueprint for equipping California to cope with more extreme droughts and floods, rising temperatures, declining fish populations, over-reliance on groundwater and other challenges. … ”  Read more from The Planning Report here:   CA Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot on the Governor’s Water Resilience Portfolio

Mapping wildlife habitat with VegCAMP

California is home to more than one thousand animal species – a diversity that would be impossible to support without the rich habitats in which they live, and specifically, the wide variety of plant species (more than 6,500) that provide sustenance and shelter.  In fact, part of the mission of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is to manage the habitats upon which our fish and wildlife species depend. The cornerstone of those management efforts is knowledge of the plant assemblages that are unique to each habitat – where these natural communities are located, how prevalent (or rare) they are, and monitoring how their distribution may shrink or grow over time. … ”  Read more from CDFW here: Mapping wildlife habitat with VegCAMP

Cotton acreage shrinks in the West

Cotton acreage in California and Arizona are down significantly as poor grower prices and water availability victimizes producers.  California cotton producers planted 28 percent fewer acres of the fiber crop this year while their neighbors in Arizona planted nearly 22 percent less acres. Arizona cotton grower Greg Wuertz of Casa Grande said his decision to plant fewer acres this year was largely due to water availability to irrigate his crop. Wuertz is the Farm Press 2020 High Cotton winner from the West. … ”  Read more from the Western Farm Press here:  Cotton acreage shrinks in the West

California wildfires …

Why California’s wildfire year could be the worst in decades

California may experience its worst year for wildfires in decades, climate experts say, pointing out that it has already battled two of the three largest blazes in its recorded history during an intense heatwave this month – even before the peak season begins.  Record temperatures have exacerbated the state’s ongoing drought and triggered dry-lightning that started more than 700 fires, some in redwood rainforests and Joshua trees that do not normally burn. … ”  Read more from Reuters via WIN 98.5 here: Why California’s wildfire year could be the worst in decades

How California Condors and other rare wildlife weather wildland fires

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with land managers and fire response agencies across California to monitor potential impacts of wildland fires on rare wildlife and plants.  “While it’s still too early to understand the long-term impacts of the wildfires on rare wildlife, the primary short-term impact is loss of their habitat,” said Chris Dellith, senior fish and wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Some ecosystems are fire-adapted and require fire to be maintained; in some cases, native plants require fire regeneration as part of their life cycle. … ”  Read more from the US FWS here:  How California Condors and other rare wildlife weather wildland fires

Don’t worry about the redwoods. They’re hella tough

While Californians have been coping with massive wildfires, filthy air, extreme heat and a deadly pandemic, fire damage incurred by old-growth trees in Big Basin Redwoods State Park has hit a particular nerve, especially with those who have once stood gazing skyward at these majestic icons of California’s natural splendor.  But don’t mourn too hard. Most of the ancient trees, some of them 2,000 years old, have survived, in Big Basin as well as in Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve. And redwoods, well, they are tough. KQED recently spoke with Jeffrey Kane, associate professor of Fire Ecology and Fuels Management at Humboldt State University, about the species’ resilience after a wildfire. … ”  Read more from KQED here: Don’t worry about the redwoods. They’re hella tough

California’s wildlife can handle fires – human encroachment is the problem

At 5:33 a.m. on May 13, 2017, Steven Sergeant was standing at the edge of Mississippi Lake in Henry W. Coe State Park southeast of San Jose. The sun was just starting to peek over the horizon.  You could hear the morning chorus of birds, fish jumping in the lake, black-tailed jackrabbits beginning to stir. Sergeant set up his recording gear to capture it all.  Earlier this week, the area around that lake was engulfed by the massive SCU Lightning Complex wildfire. About 40,000 acres of Henry Coe burned, half of the entire park. That actually made Wes Gray, a natural resource manager for California State Parks, pretty happy.  “From the ecological standpoint,” he said, “I think the plants and animals are going to see a great benefit from this fire at Henry Coe.” … ”  Read more from KQED here:  California’s wildlife can handle fires – human encroachment is the problem

Berkeley expert explains the wildland-urban interface: ‘We have to find a way to live with fire’

Two of the largest wildfires in California’s history swept through the Bay Area region this month, scorching hundreds of thousands of acres as they left a path of destruction in their wake. Thousands of homes and infrastructure fell victim to the blaze as countless others remain threatened.  “We’ve never seen fire of this scale in this part of the state,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said on Wednesday. “It demonstrates the reality — not just the point of view — of climate change and its impact in this state.” … ”  Read more from SF Gate here: Berkeley expert explains the wildland-urban interface: ‘We have to find a way to live with fire’

California fires: What to expect in the coming months

California has already had a historic year for wildfires.  So far, 1.66 million acres have burned — an area five times the size of the city of Los Angeles. Almost no part of the state is untouched. From the Santa Cruz Mountains to Riverside County, the slopes of Mount Hamilton to Napa Valley and the northern Sierra, 15,800 firefighters from as far away as Florida and New Jersey are battling two dozen major fires, many sparked by rare lightning storms two weeks ago.  And although fire crews are finally gaining the upper hand on many, fire experts have a stark message: This year is particularly dry, and the worst could still be to come. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here:  California fires: What to expect in the coming months

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In people news this weekend …

PASSINGS

James C. Jones: 1941-2020

” … One true through line in Jim’s life was his passion and love of fishing and the outdoors. He fervently believed in protecting the environment in general and the American River in particular. Each of us owe him a debt of gratitude for his work with the Save The American River Association (SARA) and The American River Parkway Foundation, which he co-founded. His tireless and persuasive energy helped result in one of the Sacramento area’s most treasured features, the American River Parkway. ... ”  Click here to read obituary at Legacy website.   There is a bridge over the American River named after him, which the author in this post writes, “That’s one of the interesting things about the American River Parkway — there are these places tucked away that have been named after people like Jim Jones to acknowledge the role these individuals played in preserving the parkway for the rest of us.”  RIP Jim Jones.

PROFILES

Q&A with Baker Holden III, Lodi Fish and Wildlife Office’s Deputy Project Leader

Q: You’ve worked for the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service and Bureau of Land Management, and this is your second stint with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Why did you come back?  A: I like the mission, and I found the culture was welcoming and one I could thrive in. I saw opportunities here because it’s all about what you do and what you can bring as a person. They’re making a big effort to support diversity, talk about it openly and take concrete steps to move forward.  Q: What is special to you about the Service’s mission? A: People know the Service lists endangered and threatened species, but we also do oil spill response, we manage invasive species, and this is where the national fish hatcheries are held. There’s variety to the mission, and all of it converges around protecting natural resources for future generations. … ”  Continue reading at the US FWS here:  People profile: Baker Holden III

ACHIEVEMENTS

2020 Stanford graduate wins journalism award

Madison Pobis, ’20, is among the winners of the Society of Environmental Journalists 19th Annual Awards for Reporting on the Environment for her article, “Small farmers wait for California’s groundwater hammer to fall.”  Written for Stanford’s Bill Lane Center for the American West, the story reports on the ways small farmers in California are preparing for severe cutbacks on their groundwater allowances in the initial planning stages of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA).  “What’s so exciting about this story is how it uses novel storytelling techniques to capture the scale of groundwater issues in California,” Pobis said. “This award is special for me because it validates that a character-driven narrative can be just as rigorously reported, illuminating and essential to readers as a hard-hitting exposé.” … ”  Read more from Stanford News here:  2020 Stanford graduate wins journalism award

San Bernardino Valley Water Conservation District receives statewide recognition for local groundwater council

Unprecedented teamwork among local water districts to establish a regional water storage program has received statewide recognition as the Innovative Project of the Year by the California Special Districts Association, the San Bernardino Valley Water Conservation District (SBVWCD) announced today.  The award was presented in recognition of outstanding collaboration among San Bernardino Basin Groundwater Council members that include: the SBVWCD in partnership with San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District; East Valley Water District; the cities of Colton, Redlands, Loma Linda and Rialto; San Bernardino Municipal Water Department; Fontana Water Company; Western Municipal Water District; Yucaipa Valley Water District; and West Valley Water District. … ”  Continue reading at the San Bernardino Water Conservation District website here:  San Bernardino Valley Water Conservation District receives statewide recognition for local groundwater council

 

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In regional water news this weekend …

South Fork Eel River adult salmonid sonar monitoring program project update

The South Fork Eel River is a salmon and steelhead stronghold and represents the best opportunity to restore wild fish abundance. This stretch of river has been impacted by excessive water diversions in many of its tributaries. Improving stream flows is critical to protecting key life-stages for coho salmon and steelhead survival.  To inform our conservation work on the Eel, CalTrout has teamed up with partners on this new project – The Adult Salmonid Sonar Monitoring Program –  to tally the annual spawning run of Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead on the South Fork Eel River with a Sound Metrics Dual Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) camera. ... ”  Read more from Cal Trout here:  South Fork Eel River adult salmonid sonar monitoring program project update

Garberville Sanitary District to pay $40,000 for unauthorized bulk water sales

After violating a 2012 Cease and Desist Order by repeatedly selling unauthorized bulk water that was transported to construction sites in three northern California communities, the Garberville Sanitary District agreed to pay $40,000 in a settlement with the State Water Resources Control Board.  The order requires the district to stop selling and delivering water to users outside its permitted area unless needed for emergency domestic supply. In the case of an emergency, the order requires the district to maintain accurate records of the sales, including the date, location, volume of water provided and name of the purchaser.

Click here to continue reading the press release from the State Water Board.

During an investigation prompted by complaints from local residents, staff found the district violated both provisions of the order between 2017-2019, first by selling bulk water for construction projects 99 times in Humboldt, Lake and Mendocino counties – all locations outside its authorized area – and failing to record the site locations on 106 occasions.

“We take cease and desist violations very seriously, particularly in sensitive watersheds,” said Robert Cervantes, program manager for Water Rights Enforcement. “Selling bulk water to someone who then transports the supply outside the permitted area, and in this case, to construction sites that could have purchased water elsewhere, reduces the supply for local residents and harms habitat.”

The settlement also requires the sanitary district to decline future requests for non-emergency bulk water that would be delivered beyond its place of use unless the customer has a temporary urgency change petition approved by the State Water Board.

The board’s mission is to preserve, enhance and restore the quality of California’s water resources and drinking water for the protection of the environment, public health and all beneficial uses, and to ensure proper water resource allocation and efficient use for current and future generations.

Walbridge fire damages half of prime salmon, steelhead spawning grounds, experts say

In burning to the edge of Lake Sonoma, the Walbridge fire has posed an unprecedented threat to the water supply for 600,000 North Bay residents and scorched Sonoma County streams that are critical to the revival of imperiled fish.  Rural residents and environmentalists also are concerned the miles of bulldozer tracks left by firefighters — an essential tool in the ongoing battle against the 55,000-acre fire — could contribute to post-fire erosion, water pollution and possible mudslides when winter rains fall on barren ground.  Experts estimated that half of the spawning habitat on Russian River tributaries has been burned, dealing a potential setback to expensive, longstanding efforts to bolster the coho salmon and steelhead trout populations. … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here:  Walbridge fire damages half of prime salmon, steelhead spawning grounds, experts say

Point Reyes wildfire reshaping coastal wilderness

The Woodward wildfire burning in the Point Reyes National Seashore is altering the landscape and ecology there in ways not seen for almost 25 years.  Wildfires can have lasting impacts — for good or ill — on the region’s natural environment and inhabitants, from pines to moths to mountain beavers.  Some plants such as the bishop pine require fire for their seeds to germinate. The flames can also clear away dense vegetation, making way for other species that had been crowded out for decades. … ”  Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here:  Point Reyes wildfire reshaping coastal wilderness

Bay Area Bucket List: 5 must-do Peninsula outdoor activities

The Peninsula’s perfect for pandemic-era adventures, with its acres and acres of protected coastline, park land and open space. And there’s something for outdoors enthusiasts of every skill level, from weekend wanderers to experienced hikers.  Here are five great activities to enjoy right now. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here: Bay Area Bucket List: 5 must-do Peninsula outdoor activities

Monterey: California Public Utilities Commission cancels controversial water charge

A water charge used by California American Water to collect more than $60 million from Monterey Peninsula customers over the past decade has been discontinued by the California Public Utilities Commission over concerns that the mechanism had been manipulated and abused by water utility companies.  In a move celebrated by customer advocates including the CPUC’s Public Advocates Office, the commission voted 4-1 on Thursday to eliminate the charge known as the water revenue adjustment mechanism. … ”  Read more from the Monterey Herald here:  California Public Utilities Commission cancels controversial water charge

Amador County: Sides weigh in on Mule Creek State Prison order

The public comment period for the California Department of Correction’s Mule Creek State Prison Facility Ione, CA – Settlement Agreement and Stipulation for Entry of Administrative Civil Liability Order to address the discharge of 1,119,746 gallons of contaminated stormwater discharged to surface water over 79 days between January 18, 2018 and April 10, 2019 ended at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, August 19, 2020. The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) had not posted public comments as of press time. However, the Ledger Dispatch did obtain responses from Amador County Counsel representing Amador County, as well as the Law Offices of Andrew L. Packard representing the California Sportsfishing Protection Alliance (CSPA), and David Anderson, one of the three workers who fell ill installing a culvert along the perimeter of Mule Creek State Prison (MCSP). … ”  Read more from the Amador Ledger-Dispatch here:  Amador County: Sides weigh in on Mule Creek State Prison order

Ridgecrest: Groundwater Authority approves transient pool, fallowing program

The Indian Wells Valley Groundwater Authority last week voted unanimously to adopt a transient pool and fallowing program and also approve findings that the programs are exempt from California Environmental Quality Act (or CEQA) review — meaning the programs are not considered to have a significant impact on the environment.  The decision came down after an intense two-day meeting Aug. 20 and 21 culminating with an unsuccessful protest hearing against the IWVGA’s basin replenishment fee and the authority’s subsequent four to one approval of the fee. IWV Water District Director Ron Kicinski was the lone no vote on the replenishment fee. … ”  Read more from the Ridgecrest Independent here: Groundwater Authority approves transient pool, fallowing program

Santa Clarita: Letter distorted water issue, says Matt Stone of SCV Water

He writes, “In a recent letter (Stacy Fortner, Aug. 20), SCV Water was characterized as “promoting” the proposed Spring Canyon Development. SCV Water is not a land use planning or approval authority, nor does it promote development. Our focus is on planning and implementing water facilities and sources to serve the needs of our community. Development planning and approvals take place within either the county or city jurisdiction, with review generally through a planning commission and approval ultimately through the governing body (City Council or Board of Supervisors). New development must also adhere to federal, state and local codes and standards.  … ”  Read more from The Signal here: Santa Clarita: Letter distorted water issue, says Matt Stone of SCV Water

Dow Chemical, Shell sued by South Pasadena over TCP contamination

Dow Chemical and Shell Oil were hit with a lawsuit Wednesday by South Pasadena accusing the companies of contaminating the city’s water supply with a toxic chemical found in pesticides the companies once made.  The suit filed in Los Angeles federal court alleges the companies knew or should have known that the chemical, known as 1,2,3-trichloropropane, or TCP, is toxic and renders drinking water unsafe. The companies manufactured and marketed agricultural pesticides containing the chemical for years — and it was used on land in the vicinity of South Pasadena’s wells. … ”  Read more from My LA News here:   Dow Chemical, Shell sued by South Pasadena over TCP contamination

Manhattan Beach: $39 million Peck Reservoir rebuild will begin in October

After nearly a decade of planning, the City of Manhattan Beach will begin a $39 million rebuild of Peck Reservoir, its 63-year-old water storage and filtration facility. The project was unanimously approved by City Council at its August 20 meeting. The Peck Reservoir Replacement Project was originally proposed in 2010 but took a decade to plan, go through environmental approvals, and finance. Stephanie Katsouleas, the director of Public Works, led an extensive public outreach effort over the last two years and oversaw multiple bids for contractors to engage in the construction and design of the new reservoir. … ”  Read more from Easy Reader News here:  $39 million Peck Reservoir rebuild will begin in October

Solana Beach resolution declares climate emergency, need for more action

In response to the adverse impacts of heatwaves, wildfires, sea level rise and other issues stemming from climate change, the Solana Beach City Council approved a resolution declaring a climate emergency and calling for accelerated action to address the crisis.  “Solana Beach would directly experience these impacts that include warming temperatures, increased wildfires, sea level rise and variable water supply,” Rimga Viskanta, a senior management analyst for the city of Solana Beach, said during the council’s Aug. 26 meeting. … ” Read more from the Del Mar Times here:  Solana Beach resolution declares climate emergency, need for more action

Along the Colorado River …

Getting up to speed on the Lake Powell Pipeline project

You can’t write about water issues in southwestern Utah without eventually addressing the largest elephant in the room — The Lake Powell Pipeline. At The Spectrum & Daily News, we’ve been preparing a set of stories for you on the progress and controversy surrounding the pipeline. But I also wanted to make sure to address it here before the conclusion of the public comment period that is open now through Sept. 8. ... ”  Read more from the St. George Spectrum here: Getting up to speed on the Lake Powell Pipeline project

Nevada residents blast Utah’s Lake Powell pipeline plan

A group of residents in a southern Nevada town that sits along the Colorado River are organizing a campaign to oppose a proposed pipeline that would divert billions of gallons of river water to southwest Utah, reflecting intensifying struggles over water in the U.S. West.  Laughlin residents Brea Chiodini and Sharon Sauer, both members of the “River Flow Committee” community organization, are collecting signatures for a letter they intend to send to the Bureau of Reclamation about what they see as the project’s dangers, The Laughlin Nevada Times reported. … ” Read more from the Ridgefield News-Press here:  Nevada residents blast Utah’s Lake Powell pipeline plan

Progress is made to restore the Gila River’s flow in metro Phoenix after decades of planning

” … For now, the Gila River flows from New Mexico into Arizona, winding near Phoenix, through the Gila River Indian Community, Avondale and Goodyear before it becomes log-jammed in Buckeye by the salt cedar.  City leaders from Phoenix and the West Valley suburbs have partnered with the Gila River Indian Community, state, county and federal agencies, nonprofits and the private sector to restore the river’s flow. Nonprofits such as the Audubon Society and private-sector companies such as REI are part of the effort.  … ” Read more from Arizona Central here: Progress is made to restore the Gila River’s flow in metro Phoenix after decades of planning

In national water news …

ESA to potentially reflect a new ‘habitat’ definition under proposal

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has proposed a rule to amend the Endangered Species Act (ESA) with a new ‘habitat’ definition. The proposed rule is currently available for comment through the Federal Register until September 4. The proposal of a clear definition of ‘habitat’ comes as a result of a 2018 U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding critical habitat for the dusky gopher frog. The Weyerhaeuser Co. v. U.S. FWS essentially determined that land must currently be habitable for the USFWS to designate an area as ‘critical habitat.’ ... ” Read more from Ag Net West here:  ESA to potentially reflect a new ‘habitat’ definition under proposal

What is blue carbon, anyway?

The term “blue carbon” refers to the carbon sequestered and stored by coastal habitats, such as seagrass meadows, salt marsh, and mangrove forests. Carbon is sequestered in these habitats by plants taking up atmospheric carbon dioxide and converting it to organic carbon through photosynthesis. The carbon is then stored as vegetative biomass aboveground and belowground as roots. Additionally, as plants die, some of the organic material becomes buried belowground and accumulates in the soil. … ”  Read more from ESA here:  What is blue carbon, anyway?

NEPA rules rewrite: potential impacts on federal-state environmental reviews & studies

In this eAlert, we focus on (1) the potential impact of the 2020 NEPA regulations on coordination of federal and state environmental reviews, and (2) whether the regulations will achieve the goal of reducing duplication of state and federal environmental studies.  A stated objective of the CEQ’s 2020 regulations is to improve the efficiency of environmental reviews of projects subject to NEPA. The 2020 regulations make minor changes to the 1978 NEPA regulations regarding coordination of federal-state environmental reviews. The revisions continue to direct federal agencies to cooperate with state, tribal and local agencies to reduce duplication of environmental reviews.  Other provisions of the 2020 revisions, however, may create new obstacles to the efficient coordination of federal and state environmental reviews and increase litigation risks. ... ”  Read more from Nossaman here:  NEPA rules rewrite: potential impacts on federal-state environmental reviews & studies

Podcasts …

Water Buffs Podcast with Cynthia Koehler: Water managers cope with climate change

We discuss innovative water solutions with Cynthia Koehler, executive director of the Water Now Alliance, a nonprofit that works with water providers to help them address climate change and other challenges facing our water systems. Topics include water conservation, green infrastructure, tiered water pricing, big data and new technologies. Koehler is currently serving her 4th term as a board member of the Marin Municipal Water District, north of San Francisco.


Water is a Many Splendor’ed Thing: A Historian’s View of the Delta

Steve Baker writes, “Change is an understatement that is occurring in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta today. It used to be that the Delta controlled our communities but now our communities are changing the Delta. Conditions have reversed. Waters of the Delta are in the midst of a tug-of-war. If California is not careful, the largest inland delta on the western coast of the North American continent will be damaged. Water is a Many Splendor’ed Thing brings you another water relationship that has a personally significant impact to your life.”  Podcasts here Produced by Steven Baker, Operation Unite® Bringing People Together to Solve Water Problems, Online at www.operationunite.co


Water Talk: Small farms and water

A conversation with Dr. Ruth Dahlquist-Willard about crops, irrigation, drought, groundwater management, and water policy on diverse small farms in the CA Central Valley. Recorded June 16, 2020.

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And lastly … the return of Rock-a-Hoola … ?

Long-time readers of mine may remember my photoblog posts of the abandoned Rock-a-Hoola waterpark which I visited in 2011 and again in 2013.  It was in operation back in the 1980s clearly before safety rules and lawsuits became the norm, and has been through a few brief incarnations since.  I visited long before Instagram made it famous so I’m a bit sad to see it all graffiti-d up over the years.  Now (yet again), there are those that are contemplating starting it back up.  I would say, even when I visited it many years ago, it was a total loss and would have had to be demolished and rebuilt, in which case, why would you build a water park there?  Out in the middle of the desert, not particularly close to any population center and Barstow about 10 miles away.   A waterpark in the middle of the desert, in the middle of nowhere … a thought for you to ponder.

A giant water park in the California desert was abandoned 3 times. Now, its eerie remains could spring back to life.

Like many abandoned properties, the Lake Dolores Waterpark has offered plenty of fodder for ghost stories. It has weathered its fair share of disasters — including an employee accident, bankruptcy, and arson.  After several attempts to revive the 1950s relic, the park officially shuttered in 2004. In the years that followed, it became a rummage yard for metal scraps, a canvas for graffiti artists, and an obstacle course for thrill-seeking skateboarders.  Lately, it has offered a psychedelic backdrop for Instagram photos. People frequently ignore “no trespassing signs” to pose in front of a dried-out pool or decaying water slide.  But the water park could spring to life again soon. … ”  Read more (and see pictures) from Business Insider here:  A giant water park in the California desert was abandoned 3 times. Now, its eerie remains could spring back to life.

Also this weekend on Maven’s Notebook …

CA WATER & POWER MAGAZINE: Utilities perserve during pandemic; Federal, state agencies scrutinize PFAS in water supply; Five changes California utilities should watch amid our uncertain future

HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM update reports updated in last 7 days

 

About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

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