DAILY DIGEST: Biops may foil Trump’s plan to boost water deliveries; Dozens of enviro groups want to contribute to Newsom’s water portfolio plan; How a big farm guards its delicate ecosystem; Monterey: Cal Am cleared to break ground on desal plant; Water in Trona area is now safe to drink; and more …

In California water news today, Salmon study may foil Trump’s plan to boost water deliveries to Central Valley farms; Dozens of Environmental Groups Want to Contribute to Newsom’s Water Portfolio Plan; Unclear how landscape contractors will approach their work in California, now drought has ended; How a Big Farm Guards its Delicate Ecosystem; Western farmland continues to disappear; Bill Would Require DoD to Share Water Contamination Data with Local Communities; Sea level rise: Could Antarctica be refrozen? Don’t laugh; Bald eagles booming in Oroville; Monterey: Cal Am cleared to break ground on desalination plant; Water in Trona area is now safe to drink, San Bernardino County says; LA’s Kern County sludge farm to stop receiving free Bakersfield water; and more …

On the calendar today …

  • The Central Coast Regional Water Quality Board will hold a listening session for the Governor’s water resilience portfolio as part of its regular meeting which begins at 9am in Santa Barbara.  Click here for more information.
  • SGMA Tribal Advisory Group Meeting from 9:30am to 4:30pm in Sacramento.  Hosted by the Department of Water Resources.  Click here for more information.
  • Wholesale Water Loss Audit Webinar from 10am to 12pm.  Hosted by the Department of Water Resources.  Click here for more information.
  • Delta Conveyance Finance Authority Board Meeting from 11am to 12pm in Sacramento. For more information, click here.
  • BROWN BAG SEMINAR: The Place of Estuaries along the Continuum from Mountains to Oceans from 12pm to 1pm in Sacramento.  For more information, click here.
  • Delta Conveyance Design and Construction Authority, Board of Directors Meeting from 2pm to 5:30pm in Sacramento.  For more information, click here.
  • The Delta Protection Commission meets in Stockton from 5:30pm to 7:30pm.  Agenda items include an update on the agricultural chapter of the Economic Sustainability Plan, an update from the Delta Watermaster, and an update on the Delta Socioeconomic Indicators project.  Click here for agenda and meeting materials.

In the news today …

Salmon study may foil Trump’s plan to boost water deliveries to Central Valley farms:  “Federal biologists worked frantically this year to meet a deadline to assess the environmental impacts of Trump administration plans to send more water to Central Valley farmers.  But the biologists’ conclusion — that increased deliveries would harm endangered Chinook salmon and other imperiled fish — would foil those plans. Two days after it was submitted, a regional federal official assembled a new review team to improve the documents.  The move is the latest salvo in the decades-long battle over the environmental harm caused by the mammoth government operations that export water supplies from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of California’s vast water system. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here: Salmon study may foil Trump’s plan to boost water deliveries to Central Valley farms

Dozens of Environmental Groups Want to Contribute to Newsom’s Water Portfolio Plan:  “A coalition of 55 environmental, fishing, and water policy groups has written Gov. Gavin Newsom, backing his Water Portfolio planning process, and announcing that they plan to take an active part with their own proposals for the plan.  Newsom announced his Water Portfolio on April 29. He ordered three state agencies — Natural Resources, EPA, and Food & Agriculture — to prepare “a water-resilience portfolio that meets the needs of California’s communities through the 21st Century.”  The plans will be developed in consultation with the Department of Finance. … ”  Read more from the Livermore Independent here:  Dozens of Environmental Groups Want to Contribute to Newsom’s Water Portfolio Plan

On the mend: It’s still unclear how landscape contractors will approach their work in states like California and Utah, where droughts have ended – for now:  “Despite the fact California lifted its statewide drought designation earlier this spring, California Landscape Contractors Association’s Sandra Giarde says it’ll still be business as usual for landscapers.  Giarde, the CLCA executive director, points out that parts of California are already teetering back on the edge of a drought again. Laws have yet to change that were put into place to conserve water during the drought, such as rules against hosing down concrete sidewalks. Those bans will only slowly be lifted by each municipality over time, if they’re even lifted at all.  And though the governor’s announcement that the drought concluded marked an official end to one of the driest times in the state’s history, Giarde says landscapers factor drought into everything they do. ... ”  Read more from Lawn & Landscape here: On the mend: It’s still unclear how landscape contractors will approach their work in states like California and Utah, where droughts have ended – for now

Getting lost in the Tahoe region’s wilderness areas:  “More so than ever, Americans are turning to nature as an antidote to modern life. Thankfully, there are thousands of protected natural spaces around the country to escape to, from state and national parks to wildlife refuges and Bureau of Land Management parcels.  But no area of land is sheltered more from the imprint of man than the United States’ wilderness areas.  … There are a number of wilderness areas surrounding the Lake Tahoe region, including Desolation, Granite Chief, Mt. Rose, Mokelumne and Carson-Iceberg wilderness areas. The best way to understand why these lands are so important to protect is to get out and experience them. … ”  Read more from the Nevada Appeal here: Getting lost in the Tahoe region’s wilderness areas

AGRICULTURE

How a Big Farm Guards its Delicate Ecosystem:  “This part of the country was formed for farming. “Flat as a pancake,” according to one who works the land, 118 feet above sea level, adjacent to wetlands and irrigation canals, surrounded by orchards, horse properties, marijuana farms, ranches — acres and acres of assorted agriculture.  The City of Los Banos, CA, in the San Joaquin Valley west of Merced, bills itself as being at the crossroads of California. And smack dab in the middle of all of it you’ll find Bowles Farming Company. It has some 12,000 acres along Route 165, home to the family owned-and-operated firm, which has tilled and planted here for six generations. … ”  Read more from Growing Produce here: How a Big Farm Guards its Delicate Ecosystem

California strawberries are about to get tastier and more environmentally friendly:  “Did you know that almost 90 percent of American strawberries are grown in California? If so, did you also know that the University of California, Davis is responsible for developing about 60 percent of California’s strawberry varieties?  In the latest news from these strawberry connoisseurs, scientists at UC Davis have developed five new types of the berry set to hit the market this fall.  “These new varieties are intrinsically different from the ones they replace,” said Steve Knapp, professor and director of the UC Davis Strawberry Breeding Program, according to a news story on the UC Davis site. “After more than three years of field tests, we’re seeing higher yields, greater disease resistance and better quality after harvest.” … ”  Read more from SF Gate here: California strawberries are about to get tastier and more environmentally friendly

Farmers call for better broadband in rural California:  “Having trouble reading this on your laptop or smartphone? You might be among the more than one-quarter of rural Americans with insufficient broadband service.  From equipment diagnostics to data transfers to irrigation control to simple text messaging, tech is becoming a way of life on the farm—but is only as good as the local internet connection.  “America’s farmers and ranchers embrace technology that allows their farming businesses to be more efficient, economical and environmentally responsible,” the American Farm Bureau Federation states in a policy paper on the topic, citing precision applications of water, fertilizer and crop-protection materials among the benefits of tech on the farm. … ”  Read more from Ag Alert here:  Farmers call for better broadband in rural California

Perdue Observes Challenges Facing California Avocados First-Hand:  “U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue recently toured a farm in San Diego to better understand how California avocados are produced and learn more about what types of challenges the industry is facing.  Secretary Perdue spent time at Rancho Guejito Avocado Farm in Escondido touring the operation and talking with industry members.  “It gave us an opportunity to spend some one-on-one time with just a handful of growers, to go out into an avocado grove,” said Tom Bellamore, president of the California Avocado Commission. “To give him a little better idea of just what grove conditions are like and what it’s like to be out in the fields.” ... ”  Read more from Ag Net West here:  Perdue Observes Challenges Facing California Avocados First-Hand

Western farmland continues to disappear: “Mike Somerville’s horse-hay operation between Caldwell and Marsing, Idaho, is surrounded by farms.  But like many others in the area, he’s concerned about a potential wave of development flooding the area with new houses and other uses.  “Our local officials need to be more sensitive to the values of agricultural land as compared to the developer, who just wants to buy land and develop it without any consideration of the land around it,” said Somerville, who is also a Canyon Soil Conservation District board member and a state Association of Soil Conservation Districts regional director. … ”  Read more from Capital Press here: Western farmland continues to disappear

NATIONAL

The Importance Of Groundwater And Of Predicting Human Impacts On It:  “It may be out of sight, but it should not be out of mind.  Water hidden beneath the earth’s surface comprises 98% of the planet’s fresh water. On average, this groundwater provides a third of all total water consumed, and its preciousness is ever more palpable since Cape Town’s water crisis sent shock waves rippling around the world.  Despite this, its regulation is far from ideal – especially now that drought conditions are intensifying around the globe and people are increasingly drilling downwards.  Before we even start to improve groundwater management, we must better understand and measure it, says international groundwater expert Craig Simmons, from Flinders University in Adelaide. ... ”  Read more from Forbes Magazine here: The Importance Of Groundwater And Of Predicting Human Impacts On It

‘The river disappears, but the pollution doesn’t’:  “The Big Lost River earns its name. Beginning in Idaho’s tallest peaks, moving through irrigation dams and diversions, the river flows into the desert here and simply ends.  An ancient tributary to the iconic Snake River, the Big Lost was cut off by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago. Lava cooled into porous basalt, now covered by volcanic ash. When the river reaches the aptly named Sinks, it disappears underground.  Water “lost” today will reemerge in 200 years at the other side of the aquifer, 100 miles away, pouring into the Snake River from black canyon walls sprouting bright green vegetation. … ”  Read more from E&E News here: ‘The river disappears, but the pollution doesn’t’

A new drinking water crisis hits US military bases across the nation:  “The U.S. military’s use of firefighting foam that contains potentially dangerous chemical compounds could have serious health consequences for the workers who handle it and those who live nearby.  The Department of Defense had identified 401 military sites that could be contaminated with the toxic compounds, known as PFAS, as of August 2017.  The Environmental Working Group and Northeastern University have mapped at least 712 documented cases of PFAS contamination across 49 states, as of July 2019. That map includes contamination on military bases along with industrial plants, commercial airports and firefighting training sites. … ”  Read more from CNBC here:  A new drinking water crisis hits US military bases across the nation

Bill Would Require DoD to Share Water Contamination Data with Local Communities:  “The House version of the defense policy bill would require the Pentagon to share data on groundwater contamination on military bases with local communities.  The $733 billion National Defense Authorization legislation passed by the House last Friday included an amendment sponsored by Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio, requiring the Pentagon to share information on possible contamination from the chemical known as PFAS, widely used in firefighting foam at military bases. … ”  Read more from Military.com here: Bill Would Require DoD to Share Water Contamination Data with Local Communities

Lawmakers Warned About Shakeup of EPA Advisory Panels:  “Advisory committees for the Environmental Protection Agency have been stripped of academic scientists while stakeholders from industries the agency regulates have filled out those spots, in a shift that scientists warned Tuesday could upend oversight of environmental matters in favor of profit-driven motives.  The flow of scientists ousted from advisory committees – bodies which provide impartial guidance on public health policies spearheaded by the EPA – has been ongoing since 2017. ... ”  Read more from Courthouse News Service here: Lawmakers Warned About Shakeup of EPA Advisory Panels

Democrats vow to block BLM move:  “Interior Secretary David Bernhardt can expect lots of questions and pushback from congressional Democrats regarding his plan to relocate hundreds of senior positions within the Bureau of Land Management from its Washington, D.C., headquarters to various Western states, several members of both parties said yesterday on Capitol Hill.  “Well, we’re going to do everything we can to stop this effort,” said Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), an appropriator who has a large federal employee constituency. “We obviously have the upcoming appropriations bills, and those will be an opportunity to try to stop this from happening.” … ”  Read more from E&E News here: Democrats vow to block BLM move

BLM move hailed for long-term benefits:  “Diane Schwenke and Robin Brown welcome the 27 jobs coming to the Grand Valley as part of a reorganization of the Bureau of Land Management.  What’s even more important in terms of the long-term implications, Schwenke and Brown said, is what’s coming with them, and that’s the headquarters of the federal agency.  “This raises the national awareness of Grand Junction like nothing we could ever do in a marketing campaign,” said Schwenke, president and chief executive officer of the Grand Junction Area Chamber of Commerce. … ”  Read more from The Business Times here: BLM move hailed for long-term benefits

USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move to Kansas City:  “The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will lose nearly two-thirds of its staff at two research agencies as the department pushes ahead with a move to the Kansas City area.  Sixty-seven percent of employees at the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) will leave their jobs instead of uprooting for Kansas City, as will 57 percent of those currently working at the Economic Research Service (ERS), according to information from USDA. ... ”  Read more from The Hill here: USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move to Kansas City

Sea level rise: Could Antarctica be refrozen? Don’t laugh:  “In a hypothetical future, the once-pristine Antarctic landscape is cluttered with cutting-edge machinery. Thousands of towering wind turbines punctuate the skyline as enormous snow machines suck water out of the ocean and blow it onto the surface of the ice sheet. The drone of heavy equipment fills the air.  It’s a shocking vision. But some scientists say it could be one way to prevent Antarctica’s most vulnerable glaciers from collapsing into the sea if global warming isn’t halted in time.  Researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research presented the concept in a new paper this week, published in the journal Science Advances. They focused on the massive Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers in West Antarctica, both famous for their rapid rates of ice loss. ... ”  Read more from E&E News here: Sea level rise: Could Antarctica be refrozen? Don’t laugh

In commentary today …

The changing Delta’s challenges: More collaboration is crucial to meet worsening problems, says Jay Lund:  He writes, “The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is essential for the Central Valley’s economy, well-being and ecosystems. It is a major supplier of land for local agriculture, water for Central Valley farms and Bay Area and southern California cities, recreation for Californians and habitat for native species.  The Delta is ever-changing, from its origins 6,000 years ago as rising post-Ice Age sea levels drowned the confluence of local rivers to form a massive freshwater marsh. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento News & Review here: The changing Delta’s challenges: More collaboration is crucial to meet worsening problems

In regional news and commentary today …

Bald eagles booming in OrovilleIt’s not unusual to spot the national bird flying around Lake Oroville every summer. What’s unusual this year is the amount currently calling Lake Oroville home.  Environmental scientists from the Department of Water Resources Oroville Field Division are keeping an eye on seven nesting pairs of bald eagles, four of which are successfully raising a total of eight young eaglets. ... ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here: Bald eagles booming in Oroville

Zone 7 Has Backup Plan to Keep Water Moving in Power Outages:  “If PG&E shuts down power as part of its plan to prevent fires in northern California, the water will keep flowing in the Valley, thanks to Zone 7 Water Agency’s preparations.  PG&E sent out notices with May bills that stated it had formed a Public Safety Power Shutoff program that would halt power deliveries in rural areas that may be threatened by wildfires. Investigators found that last year’s fatal Camp Fire, in Butte County, was caused by sparks from PG&E equipment. … ”  Read more from the Livermore Independent here: Zone 7 Has Backup Plan to Keep Water Moving in Power Outages

Monterey: Cal Am cleared to break ground on desalination plant:  “The water utility for the Monterey Peninsula has overcome widespread opposition among ratepayers’ to its proposed desalination plant, securing a critical development permit from the county’s Board of Supervisors on July 15. After nearly six and a half hours of public hearing and deliberation, the board voted 3-2 to allow California American Water to break ground on the plant ahead of a September deadline imposed by state water official. Ultimately, the cost of construction is expected to reach $329 million or more. The project can still get entangled at the California Coastal Commission, which is expected to review the company’s application for shorefront pumps to supply the plant with brackish water in November. … ”  Read more from Monterey Weekly here: Cal Am cleared to break ground on desalination plant

Report: Nacimiento dam safety needs expensive upgrade: “Monterey County’s Nacimiento Dam safety program is seriously deficient with an outdated program document, insufficient staff and a long list of outstanding dam safety repairs and maintenance estimated to cost more than $50 million that needs to be addressed in short order.  That’s according to an independent outside audit of the dam safety program conducted by GEI Consultants, Inc. whose findings and recommendations were presented to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. ... ”  Read more from the Monterey Herald here: Report: Nacimiento dam safety needs expensive upgrade

Coastal Commission approves San Simeon wastewater plant riprap protections:  “When state Coastal Commission members ended their three-day meeting marathon in San Luis Obispo on Friday, July 12, they were justifiably exhausted.  After all, they’d tackled several long-running, previously contentious issues Wednesday, including a long hearing about the future of off-roading activities at the Oceano Dunes State Vehicular Recreation Area, building and operating a new Morro Bay wastewater treatment and recycled water facility and what to do about riprap protecting the San Simeon sewage treatment plant and its outfall into the Pacific. … ”  Read more from the San Luis Obispo Tribune here: Coastal Commission approves San Simeon wastewater plant riprap protections

Pine Flat reservoir nearly full in July:  “The melting snow pack is keeping Pine Flat Reservoir near capacity.  The rising water is creating a bigger play land for boaters but it’s now flowing over the dam.  Right now Pine Flat is at 94% capacity and 158% of normal for this time of year. ... ”  Read more from Fox 26 here: Pine Flat reservoir nearly full in July

Owens Valley: LADWP issues water-spreading report: “After a wet winter, the Eastern Sierra snowpack measured 171% of normal on April 1, 2019. LADWP is committed to maximizing the beneficial use of runoff water to the fullest extent and by considering the demands of the overall water system, which include customer needs, hydroelectric generation and spreading water to meet LADWP’s environmental commitments.  LADWP is working hand-in-hand with Inyo County officials to be prepared for this year’s high runoff that is proven to be a long runoff season requiring extra management. … ”  Read more from the Sierra Wave here: Owens Valley: LADWP issues water-spreading report

Kern County: No earthquake damage to dams:  “Shortly after two major earthquakes rocked buildings and rattled nerves in the Kern River Valley earlier this month, U.S. Army Corps of Engineer officials reported that it was “business as usual” at Isabella Dam, stating that the 6.4 magnitude earthquake on July 4 and 7.1 magnitude earthquake on July 5 did not cause any structural damage or safety concerns.  Safety inspections on Isabella Dam were conducted immediately following the two earthquakes that were both centered outside of Ridgecrest with the use of both digital technology and on-the-ground inspections. … ”  Read more from the Kern Valley Sun here: No earthquake damage to dams

Water in Trona area is now safe to drink, San Bernardino County says: “Residents of the Trona area no longer have to boil their water for use in cooking or drink bottled water instead of tap water, San Bernardino County officials announced Wednesday, July 17.  The order had been in place since the powerful earthquakes July 4 and July 5 struck the town located on the southwest tip of Death Valley National Park. Searles Domestic Water Co. had to fix leaks in water mains that had allowed dirt to seep into the water supply. ... ”  Read more from the San Benardino Sun here: Water in Trona area is now safe to drink, San Bernardino County says

Ridgecrest: Groundwater Authority to discuss well registration, Wellntel:  “The Indian Wells Valley Groundwater Authority board of directors will meet Thursday at 10 a.m. at Ridgecrest City Hall council chambers, 100 W. California Ave.  The board will discuss and decide on whether to adopt an ordinance over its next two meetings that will require all groundwater well owners to register their wells with the Groundwater Authority.  According to the staff report for the agenda item, the ordinance is recommended in order for the Groundwater Authority to properly adopt, implement and administer its Groundwater Sustainability Plan, which is required to be submitted to the California Department of Water Resources by Jan. 31, 2020. … ”  Read more from the Ridgecrest Independent here: Ridgecrest: Groundwater Authority to discuss well registration, Wellntel

LA’s Kern County sludge farm to stop receiving free Bakersfield water:  “It was a match made in heaven, at least for the residents of Los Angeles, but it will soon be coming to an end.  For around 20 years, Los Angeles has shipped a large portion of “biosolids” from its toilets to fertilize a farm it owns just west of Bakersfield.  Bakersfield, in return, has been providing an annual load of 18,000 acre-feet of free water to the farm, Green Acres, in a deal that was meant to benefit both cities. However, Bakersfield is choosing not to renew the water contract with LA, and the farm will have to find another source to irrigate its crops. … ”  Read more from Bakersfield.com here: LA’s Kern County sludge farm to stop receiving free Bakersfield water

Cuyama passes pay-to-pump groundwater sustainability structure:  “Cuyama landowners will soon have to pay to pump groundwater, a decision that some say will place the burden of Cuyama’s dwindling water supply largely on farmers’ shoulders. At a board of directors meeting on July 10, the Cuyama Basin Groundwater Sustainability Agency voted to approve a pay-to-pump funding structure, in which landowners are charged extraction fees each time they pump water from Cuyama’s groundwater basin. The pumping fees will fund the sustainability agency’s continued efforts to implement a groundwater sustainability plan as ordered by the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, a state law that requires critically overdrafted basins to submit plans for groundwater sustainability by Jan. 31, 2020. … ”  Read more from the Santa Maria Sun here: Cuyama passes pay-to-pump groundwater sustainability structure

L.A. River revitalization: Plan to connect Verdugo Mountains, San Rafael Hills unveiled:  “A plan to connect two ecologically rich areas in Glendale’s Verdugo Wash has been endorsed by officials tasked with revitalizing the upper part of the Los Angeles River.  “This could be a space obviously where the bobcats and the mountain lions can go through, but also where people could potentially hike and move in between these two areas,” said Jean Yang, of design firm Studio-MLA, during a public meeting held at DreamWorks Animation studio last Thursday. ... ”  Read more from the LA Times here: L.A. River revitalization: Plan to connect Verdugo Mountains, San Rafael Hills unveiled

What’s the future for the fence around the Silver Lake reservoirs? The chain-link fence has been around the reservoirs for so long that we take it for granted.  The fence was part of security measures to protect the city’s supply of drinking water. But now that we no longer use the Silver Lake and Hyperion reservoirs for potable water, the question arises – could the fence ever come down?  For some, the chain link fence is an unwanted barrier between the neighborhood and its reservoirs, an eyesore that spoils the view of the water for passersby. … ”  Read more from Eastside here:  What’s the future for the fence around the Silver Lake reservoirs?

Sea level rise preparations could cost Redondo Beach nearly $300 million:  “Redondo Beach estimates it would cost roughly $291 million to prepare for a 5.5-foot increase in sea levels by 2100, according to a recently released study.  If the city, however, does nothing and allows King Harbor to be inundated with sea water, which is predicted to occur over time, the damage could cost $79 million, with $7.8 million in potentially lost revenues to the city. … ”  Read more from The Beach Reporter here: Sea level rise preparations could cost Redondo Beach nearly $300 million

Del Mar awaits state, federal coastal actions:  “Looming decisions by state and federal agencies involving Del Mar prompted lengthy discussions but no actions by the City Council on Monday night, July 15.  The California Coastal Commission is processing an amendment to the city’s Local Coastal Plan that will incorporate the city’s approach to the projected rising sea level, which scientists say is caused by global warming.  Also, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has published proposed updated flood maps for the San Diego County coastline, including Del Mar. … ”  Read more from the Del Mar Times here: Del Mar awaits state, federal coastal actions

Installation of San Diego’s Advanced Water Metering Infrastructure Beset with Problems:  “An audit of the city of San Diego’s Public Utilities Department (PUD) and its installation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) has revealed a project beset with problems since 2015. In 2012 the city’s (PUD) entered into a contract with a vendor to complete an AMI pilot project covering approximately 11,000 customer accounts. Following the completion of the AMI pilot in 2015, the PUD was to begin a city-wide AMI implementation for the approximately 270,00 remaining metered water connections. … ”  Read more from California Water News Daily here: Installation of San Diego’s Advanced Water Metering Infrastructure Beset with Problems

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

THIS JUST IN … DWR Approves Nine Alternatives to Groundwater Sustainability Plans

BROWN BAG SEMINAR: Ecosystem services, conservation, and the Delta

SCIENCE NEWS: First reintroduced salmon return to CA rivers; Dialing in on temperatures for winter-run salmon; How much water do snowpacks hold? A better way to answer the question; House attempts to block relocation of the USGS; and more …

NEWS WORTH NOTING: Study: Value of Yosemite’s Hetch Hetchy Valley restoration could reach $100 billion or more; EPA announces $218 million water infrastructure loan to Silicon Valley Clean Water; U.S. EPA requires U.S. Lubricants Inc. to protect Los Angeles waterways from oil spills

DWR SGMA NEWS: Alternatives, Workshops on how to submit GSPs, Bulletin 118 survey, and more …

Governor’s Water Portfolio Input Meeting July 30

WATER PLAN eNEWS: ~~ Floodplain Reactivation~ Coastal Guidelines~ Climate Adaptation~ Groundwater Planning~ AWE Newsletter~ Water Conference~ Water Year 2020 ~

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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One comment

  • Francis Coats

    Do you suppose the benefits of spending time in a forest apply to forests and other lands along navigable waters including their temporarily dry banks; state-owned lands providing access to navigable and non-navigable lands for fishing; and formerly state-owned lands transferred after November 8, 1910?

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