DAILY DIGEST: Oroville Spillway work resumes; Fire officials proclaim new level of fire danger; Gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen wants to complete the State Water Project; Mexico, AZ, NV could see Colorado River cutback by 2020; and more …

In California water news today, Oroville Spillway work resumes; Fire officials proclaim new level of fire danger; Gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen wants to complete the State Water Project; California sees success against climate change, but more still needed; Precipitation whiplash and climate change threaten California’s fresh water; Mexico, Arizona, Nevada Could See Colorado River Cutback By 2020; and more …

In the news today …

Oroville Spillway work resumes: “Construction work began just after midnight Tuesday morning on phase 2 of the repairs to the Oroville Dam main spillway.  The Department of Water Resources had been granted permission by federal and state regulators to start work May 8, and contractor Kiewit Infrastructure West didn’t waste any time. … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  Oroville Spillway work resumes

Fire officials proclaim new level of fire danger:  “Fire officials gathered in Santa Rosa’s devastated Fountaingrove neighborhood Wednesday to implore residents of the entire state to prepare for what they fear will be another long, dangerous wildfire season.  Some 950 wildfires have burned more than 5,800 acres of California so far this year, and residents need to recognize that fire, as a result of a host of factors including climate change, is now a year-round threat, Cal Fire Director Ken Pimlott said. … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here:  Officials proclaim new level of fire danger

Gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen wants to complete the State Water Project:  “California has general elections coming up on November 6th, and campaigning is already underway for the June 5th primary. California Ag Today recently met with Travis Allen, a state assemblyman running to be the next governor of California.  “One of my 5 point plans is very simple: to complete the California state water project,” Allen said. … ”  Read more from Cal Ag Today here:  Gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen wants to complete the State Water Project

California sees success against climate change, but more still needed:  “A new study shows California is on the right track when it comes to reducing the effects of climate change, but the road is far from over.  The California Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment released a study on the state of the climate of California. It looked into the data of 36 climate indicators. It showed that pioneering efforts to reduce climate change are working, but climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts must continue. … ”  Read more from CBS 13 here:  California sees success against climate change, but more still needed

Precipitation whiplash and climate change threaten California’s fresh water:  “Imagine the snow in the Sierra Nevada mountains as a giant reservoir providing water for 23 million people throughout California. During droughts, this snow reserve shrinks, affecting water availability in the state.   Researchers fear global warming will cause the Sierra Nevada snowpack to lose much of its freshwater by the end of the century, spelling trouble for water management throughout the state. … ”  Read more from the Washington Post here:  Precipitation whiplash and climate change threaten California’s fresh water

In regional news and commentary today …

Klamath Irrigation District holds off on water delivery:  “Klamath Irrigation District is holding off on delivering water as the district announced Friday that it would do so on Monday.  KID’s watermaster Tyler Martin said on Tuesday the district had hoped to obtain alternative sources of water to be able to begin delivery for patrons this week. But following discussions with the Bureau of Reclamation, KID’s attorney Nathan Rietmann, KID’s management and the board of directors, as well as other districts, the district decided to hold off. … ”  Read more from the Herald & News here:  Klamath Irrigation District holds off on water delivery

Santa Cruz’s Coastal Watershed Council ‘walks the walk’ in relocating to San Lorenzo River: “The new Branciforte Creek Bridge lands one of its feet just outside the Coastal Watershed Council’s new office windows.  The office, marked on the organization’s Watershed Ranger kids’ activity booklet, will be where area children are invited come to pledge to learn about, care for and share their knowledge about the San Lorenzo River — receiving a small wooden ranger badge in exchange. … ”  Read more from the Santa Cruz Sentinel here: Santa Cruz’s Coastal Watershed Council ‘walks the walk’ in relocating to San Lorenzo River

Hazardous chemical spills into Carson River:  “Unknown amounts of a bleach-like chemical spilled into the Carson River on Wednesday near Woodfords.  Even though the tanker truck carrying the sodium hypochlorite crashed into a power pole about 10am May 9, no one had been allowed into the area as of 6pm because of the danger the chemical poses. Depending on the concentration it is dangerous to inhale or touch.  A one-square mile from the crash site was evacuated.  Hazmat crews from the Nevada National Guard were sent in to secure the site. … ”  Read more from Lake Tahoe News here:  Hazardous chemical spills into Carson River

Mono County, LA waging paper war:  “In mid-April, Mono County asked for Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s help to ensure adequate irrigation water for grazing leases in Southern Mono.  Garcetti, basically, blew the Board of Supervisors off, referring them, in the future, to the LADWP Board of Commissioners’ head Mel Levine. Mono Supervisor Fred Stump called the response “condescending.” … ”  Read more from the Sierra Wave here:  Mono County, LA waging paper war

Santa Barbara County Supes ask DWR for basin boundary change:  “The Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously on May 8 to submit a request to California’s Department of Water Resources (DWR) asking the agency to remove northern fringe areas from Santa Maria River Valley Groundwater Basin. Fourth District Supervisor Peter Adam recused himself from discussions because his family drew water from wells in the land in question.  The main areas requested for removal are on the northern and eastern edges of the county’s boundary. One such example is the Santa Maria River and the San Luis Obispo County border. That county is also considering adjusting its fringe basin as well. The basin had previously been identified by DWR as part of requirements for the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA). … ”  Read more from the Santa Maria Sun here:  Santa Barbara County Supes ask DWR for basin boundary change

Greenbelt Infiltration Project raises concerns from Hermosa Beach residents:  “Hermosa Beach is in the design planning stages of the Greenbelt Infiltration Project which will treat stormwater that runs from the Herondo Drain and into the Santa Monica Bay.  The runoff, which causes high bacteria levels and can lead to beach closures, has caused a consistent “F” grade from Heal the Bay for the last several years. … ”  Read more from The Beach Reporter here:  Greenbelt Infiltration Project raises concerns from Hermosa Beach residents

Encinitas: Rising sea levels could damage city facilities, beaches, roadways:  “Changing global climate conditions over the next century will likely result in storm-tossed waves tearing out portions of Coast Highway 101 in Cardiff far more frequently in the decades to come.  Meanwhile, Moonlight and Cardiff State beaches could both regularly battle flooding troubles, and the lifeguard tower at Swami’s Beach could be at risk if the sea levels rise as forecast, a panel of scientists and city officials said during a forum May 8. ... ”  Read more from the Del Mar Times here:  Encinitas: Rising sea levels could damage city facilities, beaches, roadways

Along the Colorado River …

Long drought makes outlook for Tucson’s share of the CAP grim:  “Longer-range outlooks for Lake Mead and the Central Arizona Project are increasingly grim due to this year’s bad runoff, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said Wednesday.  The result is that the bureau is pushing hard for states in both the Upper and Lower Basins of the Colorado River to reach agreement this year on drought planning to ease the pain of future shortages, after negotiations have so far failed. ... ”  Read more from Tucson.com here:  Long drought makes outlook for Tucson’s share of the CAP grim

Mexico, Arizona, Nevada Could See Colorado River Cutback By 2020: “Mexico and the U.S. states of Arizona and Nevada face a better-than-even possibility of getting less water from the Colorado River in 2020 because of a persistent drought, water managers said Wednesday.  The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which manages the river, released projections showing a 52 percent chance the river’s biggest reservoir, Lake Mead in Arizona and Nevada, will fall low enough in 2020 to trigger cutbacks under agreements governing the system. ... ”  Read more from CBS 13 here: Mexico, Arizona, Nevada Could See Colorado River Cutback By 2020

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

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