THIS JUST IN … New Report Shows 74 Percent of California’s Native Salmon, Steelhead and Trout Likely to Be Extinct in 100 Years, 45 Percent in 50 Years if Trends Continue

“State of the Salmonids II: Fish in Hot Water” report details crisis, IDs opportunities to reverse trend From Cal Trout: Fish and watershed advocacy group California Trout (CalTrout) and University of California Davis, Center for Watershed Sciences, provided key results from an in-depth report today detailing the status of 32 types of salmon, steelhead, and trout that are native to […]

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PANEL DISCUSSION: ESA & Climate Change: Collision Course?

  With a new administration in Washington, DC that has taken a different view of environmental regulation, changes in the Endangered Species Act perhaps seem more possible than in prior years.  The effects of climate change threaten to further complicate efforts to conserve and protect endangered species.  Is the Endangered Species Act broken?  Will the new administration make significant changes […]

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BAY-DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Problems and promise of restoring tidal marsh to benefit native fishes

Dr. John Durand discusses the effectiveness of existing and proposed tidal marsh restoration sites in the Suisun Marsh and the Delta Implementing aquatic restoration projects that scale appropriately with seasonal flows, tidal energy, and food production remains a challenge in the highly disturbed Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Bay. Many restoration projects may achieve aesthetically pleasing results that will offer […]

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BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: The effects of water project operations on juvenile salmon survival in the Delta

Literature, data review, and recommendations for future salmonid investigations Survival for migrating juvenile chinook salmon has been low for those on the San Joaquin River, averaging approximately 5% since 2002.  Survival is more variable for Sacramento River chinook salmon, and survival data are limited for steelhead.  While water export operations contribute to salmonid mortality by way of direct mortality at […]

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BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Dr. Peter Moyle on academic research, Delta smelt, and public policy: a personal history

Protection of the Bay-Delta ecosystem is at a pivotal point. The system has endured devastating drought cycles and often competing priorities that seek to supply water for both cities and farms as well as improve the aquatic ecosystem for fisheries, recreation and tourism. Achieving these co-equal goals requires science that expands our knowledge of ecosystem responses, produces data that directly […]

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PPIC POLICY PRIORITIES FOR CA WATER: Environmental impacts, the Endangered Species Act, and extinction

Phil Isenberg, Jeff Mount, and Kate Poole discuss the Endangered Species Act and the state’s approach to ecosystem restoration Although conditions in 2016 were somewhat wetter than the previous years, the specter of continuing drought keeps water at the top of the state’s policy agenda.  The event, Policy Priorities for California water, hosted by the Public Policy Institute of California […]

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Reconciliation ecology could end California’s water wars

Projects in the Sacramento Valley demonstrate the success of collaboration for the benefit of species This article first appeared in the Central Valley Business Times and is republished here with permission.  Written by Eric Miller, CVBT Correspondent. A careful foot can step anywhere, the Chinese proverb goes, so long as the foot moves in a direction that is good. But […]

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Farms as floodplains: A summary after five years of experimental flooding of agricultural land

Studies show the rice-field fish are larger, healthier and more robust than those in the river at the same age One of the recent and notable success stories for California has been the ongoing studies in the Yolo Bypass to use flooded rice fields as habitat for young migrating salmon. The results from the five years of study show the […]

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Delta smelt symposium, part 4: Panel discussion: What is the path forward among considerable uncertainty?

Panel of experts share their visions and options for the future of the Delta and longfin smelt Coverage of the Delta and longfin smelt symposium, Is Extinction Inevitable?, continues It’s been a full day of presentations; conference attendees have been given the background on the decline of the Delta and longfin smelt, a long list of potential causes, and a […]

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Delta smelt symposium, part 3: The path forward: Climate change, recovery planning, and restoration

Presenters discuss climate change, extinction, artificial propagation and stocking, and tidal marsh restoration Coverage of the Delta and longfin smelt symposium, Is Extinction Inevitable?, continues The second round of presenters provided a long list of potential causes for species decline, and conference attendees weren’t feeling very optimistic.  Is there anything we can do to preserve and restore the species?  In […]

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