BROWN BAG SEMINAR: California floodplains and the fish that use them

How restoring functional flows to floodplains could help restore native fish Two centuries ago, the floor of the Central Valley was largely a marshy wetland.  In the springtime, the snowpack would melt, swelling the rivers beyond their banks and casting the young fish out onto the floodplains.  There they would stay for months, fattening up on the abundant zooplankton and […]

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THE DELTA AND THE TRIBUTARIES, part 2: California’s salmon face challenges, but there are success stories, too

In the fall of every year, an incredible phenomenon takes place in the Central Valley: the fall salmon run.  Adult salmon travel many miles from the Pacific Ocean upstream to their spawning grounds, returning to the river where they were born, sometimes even to the same riffle, where they will spawn, laying their eggs in the gravels of the rivers […]

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CALIFORNIA WATER COMMISSION: The Delta’s history and ecology take center stage

Dr. Bruce Herbold, Robin Grossinger, and Hap Dunning among the panelists on hand to discuss the Delta’s historic ecology, the condition of native fish, the legal framework, and the emerging strategies for restoration of the Delta ecosystem In November 2014, California voters approved Proposition 1, the Water Quality, Supply, and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014.  Chapter 8 of Proposition 1 […]

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THIS JUST IN … State Launches Aggressive Strategy to Aid Salmon, Steelhead in the Sacramento Valley

Actions Aim to Reduce Threats to Iconic Species From the California Natural Resources Agency: With the latest science showing that nearly half of California’s native salmon and trout species face extinction in the next 50 years, state agencies have committed to a suite of actions to improve survival rates, including restoring habitat, improving stream flow, removing stream barriers and reintroducing […]

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THIS JUST IN … New Report Shows 74 Percent of California’s Native Salmon, Steelhead and Trout Likely to Be Extinct in 100 Years, 45 Percent in 50 Years if Trends Continue

“State of the Salmonids II: Fish in Hot Water” report details crisis, IDs opportunities to reverse trend From Cal Trout: Fish and watershed advocacy group California Trout (CalTrout) and University of California Davis, Center for Watershed Sciences, provided key results from an in-depth report today detailing the status of 32 types of salmon, steelhead, and trout that are native to […]

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PANEL DISCUSSION: ESA & Climate Change: Collision Course?

  With a new administration in Washington, DC that has taken a different view of environmental regulation, changes in the Endangered Species Act perhaps seem more possible than in prior years.  The effects of climate change threaten to further complicate efforts to conserve and protect endangered species.  Is the Endangered Species Act broken?  Will the new administration make significant changes […]

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BAY-DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Problems and promise of restoring tidal marsh to benefit native fishes

Dr. John Durand discusses the effectiveness of existing and proposed tidal marsh restoration sites in the Suisun Marsh and the Delta Implementing aquatic restoration projects that scale appropriately with seasonal flows, tidal energy, and food production remains a challenge in the highly disturbed Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Bay. Many restoration projects may achieve aesthetically pleasing results that will offer […]

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BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: The effects of water project operations on juvenile salmon survival in the Delta

Literature, data review, and recommendations for future salmonid investigations Survival for migrating juvenile chinook salmon has been low for those on the San Joaquin River, averaging approximately 5% since 2002.  Survival is more variable for Sacramento River chinook salmon, and survival data are limited for steelhead.  While water export operations contribute to salmonid mortality by way of direct mortality at […]

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BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Dr. Peter Moyle on academic research, Delta smelt, and public policy: a personal history

Protection of the Bay-Delta ecosystem is at a pivotal point. The system has endured devastating drought cycles and often competing priorities that seek to supply water for both cities and farms as well as improve the aquatic ecosystem for fisheries, recreation and tourism. Achieving these co-equal goals requires science that expands our knowledge of ecosystem responses, produces data that directly […]

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PPIC POLICY PRIORITIES FOR CA WATER: Environmental impacts, the Endangered Species Act, and extinction

Phil Isenberg, Jeff Mount, and Kate Poole discuss the Endangered Species Act and the state’s approach to ecosystem restoration Although conditions in 2016 were somewhat wetter than the previous years, the specter of continuing drought keeps water at the top of the state’s policy agenda.  The event, Policy Priorities for California water, hosted by the Public Policy Institute of California […]

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