DAILY DIGEST: Vandalism, a persistent threat to water utilities, is tough to stop; Bipartisan coalition holds press conference over drinking water standards and SB 623; Bond proposal has $200 million for Salton Sea restoration; and more …

In California water news today, Vandalism, a persistent threat to water utilities, is tough to stop; Bipartisan coalition holds press conference over drinking water standards and SB 623; Bond proposal has $200 million for Salton Sea restoration; Timeline for California's human right to water; and more …

In the news today …

Vandalism, a persistent threat to water utilities, is tough to stop:  “Decaying pipes and sprung valves are slowly getting more attention in the water sector. Studies estimate it will cost around $1 trillion to catch up with the infrastructure decay among American water utilities. But the industry faces another threat that’s a lot harder to manage: vandalism.  From simple trespassing to damaging water treatment hardware, vandalism takes many forms. It could be kids looking for a place to swim, or thieves trying to steal copper hardware to turn a quick buck. At its worst, vandalism can even be potentially deadly, such as a troublemaker breaking into a tank to contaminate the water supply. ... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Vandalism, a persistent threat to water utilities, is tough to stop

Bipartisan coalition holds press conference over drinking water standards and SB 623:  “During the drought, water was tough to come by and everyone needed some. Now, a bipartisan coalition of residents, public administrators, nonprofits and politicians are coming together to gather legislative support for Senate Bill 623.  Introduced by Senator William Monning from Santa Cruz, SB 623 is intended to establish the Safe and Aftended to establish the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund to provide an ongoing source of funding ensure all Californians have access to safe drinking water. According to a fact sheet handed out a coalition press conference last Wednesday on SB 623 the California State Water Board (SWB) has identified roughly 300 public water systems currently out of compliance. And since other sources of funding such as bond funding or the Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund do not qualify for operations and maintenance costs, there is a constant lack of adequate available funding for those things. Without that funding there is little rural communities can do to treat nitrates and other harmful chemicals out of their drinking water. … ”  Read more from the Foothills Gazette here:  Bipartisan coalition holds press conference over drinking water standards and SB 623

Bond proposal has $200 million for Salton Sea restoration:  “Earlier this month, a proposed bond measure in the California Legislature had included $280 million to pay for building thousands of acres of ponds, wetlands and other dust-control projects around the Salton Sea. This week, after negotiations among lawmakers, the amount earmarked for the Salton Sea was slashed to $200 million.  But California’s long-delayed efforts to fix environmental problems at the shrinking lake also may be eligible for more money from a separate part of the bond intended to cover the state’s obligations under several water-related agreements. … ”  Read more from The Desert Sun here:  Bond proposal has $200 million for Salton Sea restoration

Timeline for California's human right to water:  “Five years ago, on September 25, 2012, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law declaring a right “to safe, clean, affordable, and accessible water adequate for human consumption, cooking, and sanitary purposes.” The law resulted in substantial changes in policy and practice.  Click the arrows on the interactive timeline to explore legal and political milestones as California has implemented the landmark bill.”  Click here to view the timeline from Circle of Blue.

In commentary today …

Who's watching out for taxpayers on the twin tunnels? asks the Chico Enterprise-Record:  They write, “The latest news about the twin tunnels project in the delta reminds us too much of another multibillion-dollar boondoggle, the bullet train.  In each case, the government does its best to ignore concerns by taxpayers, there is deceit and outright lying in an attempt to keep the project on track, and even when the state is caught doing something that should derail the project, Gov. Jerry Brown and his state government employees put on their blinders and plug ahead. … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  Who’s watching out for taxpayers on the twin tunnels?

In regional news and commentary today …

Workers racing to repair Santa Rosa Creek tunnel:  “Workers are racing to repair a damaged tunnel underneath downtown Santa Rosa that took a beating during this past winter’s record rainfall.  Since 1963, when the flood control project was built, Santa Rosa Creek has been confined to two underground concrete box culverts running for 1,400 feet under downtown.  The 14-foot-tall tunnels begin at E Street and run beneath the U.S. Bankruptcy Court building and Santa Rosa City Hill, where they are joined by a third tunnel conveying Matanzas Creek. All three emerge at Santa Rosa Avenue, at the entrance to the Prince Memorial Greenway. ... ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here:  Workers racing to repair Santa Rosa Creek tunnel

Marin supervisors approve $1.6 million to preserve 998-acre ranch:  “The 998-acre Evans-Giacomini ranch just outside Point Reyes Station is closer to agricultural preservation now that the Board of Supervisors pitched in for the purchase this week.  The supervisors Tuesday voted unanimously to authorize the use of about $1.6 million in Measure A sales tax funds to help pay for a $3.28 million Marin Agricultural Land Trust easement on the property. MALT will contribute the remaining $1.6 million. An agricultural conservation easement is a recorded restriction on title that prohibits subdivision and limits the use of the land to agricultural purposes. ... ” Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here:  Marin supervisors approve $1.6 million to preserve 998-acre ranch

Lake Tahoe 2017-18 winter forecast: ‘Be ready for anything':  “Could the snowfall Friday, Sept. 8, on mountain passes off Highway 88 be a sign that we're in store for another heavy winter?  Skiers, snowboarders and other winter sports enthusiasts surely hope so. On the other hand, those still traumatized from the constant shoveling brought on by the drought-busting winter of 2016-17 might feel weary at the thought of winter. … ”  Read more from the Tahoe Daily Tribune here:  Lake Tahoe 2017-18 winter forecast: ‘Be ready for anything’

Embattled ethics watchdog to step down amid turmoil at water agency:  “The Metropolitan Water District’s embattled ethics watchdog announced her resignation Tuesday amid a monthslong internal struggle over her office and its investigations.  Ethics officer Deena Ghaly informed the MWD of her decision hours before the agency’s 38-member board was scheduled to evaluate her performance. Ghaly, whose office is the subject of an ongoing outside review, said it had become “impossible” for her to carry out her duties of creating, administering and enforcing ethics rules. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here:  Embattled ethics watchdog to step down amid turmoil at water agency

And lastly …

This monster ‘fatberg' weighs more than a whale – and it's stuck in London's sewers:  “It weighs as much as a whale, it’s as long as a bridge and there’s no way it smells very good.  But if you flush wet wipes down the toilet or wash grease down the drain, a “fatberg” like that one that’s clogging London’s sewers could be forming in a sewer near you.  London’s latest fatberg — a congealed, rock-hard mass of fat, grease, wet wipes, used diapers, condoms and more — clocks in at 130 tons, and it’s more than 800 feet long, according to the BBC. ... ”  Eeeeewww.  Read more here:  This monster ‘fatberg’ weighs more than a whale – and it’s stuck in London’s sewers

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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