SCIENCE NEWS: Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert; New tools for endangered species recovery; Will sea level rise harm tidal marshlands?; and more …

In science news this week: Idled farmland presents habitat restoration opportunities in San Joaquin Desert: “Most of the native habitat in California’s San Joaquin Desert has been converted to row crops and orchards, leaving 35 threatened or endangered species confined to isolated patches of habitat. A significant portion of that farmland, however, is likely to be retired in the coming […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: Insects show the healing of toxic metal mining scars; Tree rings: Looking back on old growth to predict the future; The long memory of the Pacific Ocean; Research to watch in 2019; and more …

In science news this week: Insects Show the Healing of Toxic Metal Mining Scars:  “A hue reminiscent of orange soda might be appealing at the diner, but in rivers and streams, it’s a sign of serious damage. Open pit mining, which excavates strategic minerals from huge open pits dug into the land, is particularly harmful to the environment, exposing metallic […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: Is habitat restoration actually killing plants in the California wildlands?; Sinking rails; Tule Elk: Part Tu; Collecting clean water from air, inspired by desert life; and more …

In science news this week: Is habitat restoration actually killing plants in the California wildlands? “In 2014, plant biologists with the California Department of Agriculture reported an alarming discovery: native wildflowers and herbs, grown in nurseries and then planted in ecological restoration sites around California, were infected with Phytophthora tentaculata, a deadly exotic plant pathogen that causes root and stem […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: A sailor, a squall and a scientist; Summary of transactions of the smelt working group in Water Year 2018; Surprising changes will affect biodiversity in 2019; Building a better weapon against harmful algal blooms; and more …

In science news this week: A Sailor, a Squall and a Scientist:  The Northern California Water Association blog writes, “It all started in the coastal town of Santa Barbara. It is here, along California’s southern most portion of the Central Coast, where Ted Sommer was preparing to fulfil his childhood dream.  As early as he could remember, Ted had always […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: Rice farmers, duck hunters work to create world class habitat in Sacto Valley; Surveying for survivors; Upcycling Christmas trees; How climate change is affecting small Sierra Nevada lakes; and more …

In science news this week: Maximizing every drop: Rice farmers, duck hunters work with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ducks Unlimited for ‘world class habitat’: “The rice fields are his home away from home.  Don Bransford, a third-generation rice farmer in Colusa, California, has been growing the grain since 1980.  His 1,200-acre farm is in the Sacramento Valley, which on […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: Sierra snowpack could drop significantly by the end of the century; Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge serves up winter meals to migratory birds; Stinky salmon and other natural fertilizers; The bizarre and disturbing life of sea cucumbers; and more …

In science news this week: Sierra snowpack could drop significantly by the end of the century:  “A future warmer world will almost certainly feature a decline in fresh water from the Sierra Nevada mountain snowpack. Now a new study by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) that analyzed the headwater regions of California’s 10 major reservoirs, […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: Human actions impact wild salmon’s ability to evolve; A worm, a parasite, and a salmon; Wildfire ash could trap mercury; Tracking aquifer water with seismic noise; and more …

In science news this week: Human actions impact wild salmon’s ability to evolve:  “Once spring-run chinook salmon disappear, they are not likely to re-emerge, indicates genetic analysis of the revered wild fish in a study led by the University of California, Davis. Prompt conservation action could preserve spring-run chinook, as well as their evolutionary potential.  The study, published online today […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: How many Central Valley salmon come from hatcheries?; Pacific Northwest woodlands less vulnerable to drought; New study explores ecosystem stability; US groundwater in peril; and more …

In science news this week: Clips and codes: How many Central Valley salmon come from hatcheries?  “Every year, hundreds of thousands of adult Chinook salmon race upstream to their spawning grounds in the tributaries and mainstems of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. But sometimes, salmon get mixed up about which river they should return to for spawning. Following the […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: The San Joaquin River Restoration Program, Pacific lamprey returns, Unique partnership for birds and military aircraft, Restoring side channels for salmon, New rules and new tech for groundwater, and more …

In science news this week: Sierra snowpack and the San Joaquin River Restoration Program:  “In California, we all need snow – even the fish in the San Joaquin River. The San Joaquin River Restoration Program (SJRRP) hosted the 2018 Science Meeting in Sacramento in late August to share research findings and updates about ongoing restoration activities. While much of the […]

» Read more

SCIENCE NEWS: The Spring-run Salmon Saga of the San Joaquin; How researchers flinging salmon inadvertently spurred tree growth; What’s in a scientific name? A story; and more …

In science news this week: The Spring-run Salmon Saga of the San Joaquin:  “We’ve recently reported on the long and fascinating history of Friant Dam, the collapse of San Joaquin River salmon populations, and the groundbreaking lawsuit that resulted in the San Joaquin River Restoration Program (SJRRP), one of the most ambitious river restoration projects in the country. In August, […]

» Read more
1 2 3 30