BLOG ROUND-UP: Will State Water Contractors support disclosure of forecast SWP operations?; Why no nature-based solutions for inland CA waters?; Why federal appropriations are a water thing; and more …

Will State Water Contractors support disclosure of forecast SWP operations?

Deirdre Des Jardins writes, “On January 22, 2022, Dan Bacher published an article, Why is California’s DWR increasing State Water Project allocations in the middle of a drought? Jennifer Pierre, the General Manager for the State Water Contractors: tweeted the following response to the article: “All of the allocated water is already in storage downstream of the Delta. It was pumped during the storms in December. It could not be used for the env. In the future.” The problem is that there are low point issues for Valley Water if San Luis reservoir is drawn down below 300 TAF during the summer. ... ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: Will State Water Contractors support disclosure of forecast SWP operations?

Why no nature-based solutions for inland CA waters???

Verna Jigour writes, “Much gratitude to Steve Gaines, PhD, 30 x 30 Advisory Committee member and Dean of UCSB’s Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, for pointing out, during the Jan. 12th virtual meeting , the quite conspicuous, IMO, omission from the Draft Pathways to 30×30 report of any nature based solutions pertaining to inland waters. As he noted, the only water the report discusses is coastal.  Apparently, we “stakeholders” are supposed to be satisfied that the document references the Water Resilience Portfolio, which documents the laundry list of state agency actions related to water but absolutely no nature-based solutions that were not already ongoing when the Newsom administration came into office. In terms of nature-based solutions I include the Prop. 1 funding for Sierra meadow restoration that was ongoing since the Brown administration, as well as the state’s role in Klamath dam removal efforts. … ”  Continue reading at Rainfall to Groundwater here: Why no nature-based solutions for inland CA waters???

Resetting Priorities: Clean Drinking Water for All Californians

Restore the Delta writes, “A new UC Berkeley/UCLA study, Inequities in Drinking Water Quality Among Domestic Well Communities and Community Water Systems, California, 2011‒2019 has found that an estimated 370,000 Californians rely on contaminated drinking water sources that disproportionately impact communities of color in the state. … Restore the Delta says: Ensuring that ALL Californians have clean drinking water should be the first priority of all California water resource agencies. This report reveals how we have invested in the wrong priorities in California for proper water management, and how badly communities of color have been neglected in terms of water management priorities, historically. It is unacceptable.  Restore the Delta wants the State to right the wrongs of the past and to plan for a resilient water future with climate change. We believe these priorities need to be worked on simultaneously. … ”  Continue reading at Restore the Delta here:  Resetting Priorities: Clean Drinking Water for All Californians

Restore the Delta Comments on Delta Science Action Agenda 2022-2026

Every five years, the Delta Science Program, under the wing of the Delta Stewardship Council, plans for its next five years of investments it wants to make in Delta scientific research. In December 2021, the Program released its next “Delta Science Action Agenda,” which lays out a set of research priorities based on management needs.  We at Restore the Delta stay abreast of Delta scientific issues since they are crucial to resolution and debate of ongoing Delta social, economic, and environmental issues. We have applauded the Science Program’s slow but steady efforts to build a social science role in Delta science affairs, as well as regularly commented on other science matters, from ecosystem restoration and toxic contaminant stressors, to harmful algal blooms. ... ”  Read more from Restore the Delta here: Restore the Delta Comments on Delta Science Action Agenda 2022-2026

Why Federal Appropriations Are A Water Thing

Lynn Thorpe writes, “Perhaps nothing makes people run for the hills faster than the prospect of a meaty discussion about federal appropriations of funding for the federal government. At least that what happens whenever I try to talk to my friends about it. But keep your seat for a minute.  Here’s why the federal budget and appropriations process matters. Maybe you’d rather think about what more we need to do to control water pollution. Or you’ve seen headlines about challenges in drinking water like PFAS chemicals and want to focus on addressing this issue. The decisions Congress makes on the federal budget will determine whether those issues and others  you care about are addressed and whether programs are carried out well.  … ”  Read more from We All Live Downstream here: Why Federal Appropriations Are A Water Thing

Book review: Review: Dead in the Water

David Zetland writes, “This book, with the *subtitle “a very angry book about our greatest environmental catastrophe. . . the death of the Murray-Darling Basin” is not subtle.  Richard Beasley is smart (his critiques are top notch), angry (rightfully so, given the incompetence on display), and well-founded (he makes legal briefs digestible) in his critiques of the Australian government’s catastrophic (f…ing obvious) and monumental (total failure to deliver) implementation of the Water Act of 2007 and (dependent) Basin Plan of 2012. It’s a long book, but never boring, and definitely infuriating (*hence the subtitle).  … ”  Read more at the One-Handed Economist here: Book review: Review: Dead in the Water

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.
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