DAILY DIGEST, 10/25: West Coast slammed by record-breaking bomb cyclone, but ‘not a drought buster’; Uncertainty over Potter Valley Power Plant continues to grow; State rebuffs Kettleman City’s pleas for minimum water supplies in 2022; and more …


On the calendar today …

  • PUBLIC MEETING: Water Use Efficiency Standards for Commercial, Industrial and Institutional (CII) outdoor landscape areas from 9am to 12pm. DWR will provide an update on the development processes for the outdoor water use standard and Commercial, Industrial and Institutional (CII) outdoor landscape area with dedicated irrigation meters standards.  Click here to register.

In California water news today …

STORMS

West Coast slammed by record-breaking bomb cyclone

The last installment of a parade of storms barreled into the West Coast on Sunday, unloading more heavy rain that resulted in serious flooding and debris flows across drought-stricken and wildfire-ravaged California and even breaking some all-time 24-hour precipitation records.  The storm was the last in a train of storms from the Pacific Ocean that, along with an atmospheric river of moisture, had been impacting areas from British Columbia, Canada, to parts of Southern California since the middle of last week. … ”  Read more from AccuWeather here: West Coast slammed by record-breaking bomb cyclone

‘Atmospheric river’ to bring up to 9 inches of rain to North State, but ease off by Wednesday

The atmospheric river that has been flowing through the North State, expected to bring up to 9 inches of rain in some parts of the region, is forecast to ease up this week, weather forecasters said.  But before sun returns to North State skies on Wednesday, Redding is expected to get about 3 inches of rain, while some parts of northern Shasta County will get about 9 inches, according to Eric Kurth, a National Weather Service meteorologist.  Parts of Siskiyou County will also see significant amounts of rain, the weather service said. … ”  Read more from the Redding Record Searchlight here: ‘Atmospheric river’ to bring up to 9 inches of rain to North State, but ease off by Wednesday

Wildfire burn scars in Northern California see flash flooding, debris flows from powerful storms

Heavy rains are causing rock slides, flash floods and debris flows around wildfire burn scars in Northern California.  Flash flood and debris flow warnings have been issued around the Caldor, Dixie and River fires, lasting until 3 a.m. Monday. Under a debris flow warning, ash or debris flows could be imminent or occurring.  Highway 70 is closed from the Jarbo Gap to Highway 89 after a rock slide near the Plumas/Butte County line at the Dixie Fire burn scar, one of several road closures in the region. ... ”  Read more from Capital Public Radio here: Wildfire burn scars in Northern California see flash flooding, debris flows from powerful storms

‘Not a drought buster.’ Northern California rainstorm will help but not end water woes

The rainstorm pelting Sacramento and Northern California will help remedy the state’s woeful water situation. But it won’t be nearly enough to end the epic California drought. “Even with 5 inches of rain in Sacramento, our deficits are immense,” said Jeffrey Mount, a geologist and water expert at the Public Policy Institute of California. “We’re basically missing two years of ‘precip’ in this basin. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here: ‘Not a drought buster.’ Northern California rainstorm will help but not end water woes

Blockbuster western storm heading inland with heavy rain, fierce winds

The record-breaking bomb cyclone that brought flooding rainfall to Northern and Central California over the weekend will shift its focus toward a much broader portion of the western United States.  The atmospheric river of moisture inundating the West Coast easily smashed daily rainfall records in San Francisco, Sacramento and many other locales across California to end the weekend. As the storm continues to slam California on Monday, some places could end up with more than a month’s worth of precipitation in a single day. ... ”  Read more from AccuWeather here: Blockbuster western storm heading inland with heavy rain, fierce winds

OTHER STATEWIDE NEWS

State releases proposals for making farming more climate friendly

During the past year the state has put together a long list of ideas for meeting Gov. Gavin Newsom’s executive order to employ agriculture and other nature-based solutions in the fight against climate change. Some of the proposals Kern farmers will probably like, others maybe not so much.  Suggestions advanced in a draft released for comment Oct. 11 range from greater use of groundwater recharge and conservation easements to more support for sustainable pest management, solar projects and biomass as a feedstock. ... ”  Read more from the Bakersfield Californian here: State releases proposals for making farming more climate friendly

Dixie Fire fully contained after more than 3 months, 963,309 acres burned

After more than three months, authorities say the Dixie Fire is now 100 percent contained.  Cal Fire reported full containment on Monday. It comes after an atmospheric river brought historic amounts of rainfall to Northern California over the weekend.  A total of 963,309 acres have been burned across Butte, Plumas, Shasta, Lassen and Tehama counties in the Dixie Fire – making it the larges non-complex fire in recorded California history. ... ”  Read more from Channel 13 here: Dixie Fire fully contained after more than 3 months, 963,309 acres burned

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In commentary today …

Column: California is spending billions on drought-related projects. And it’s not borrowing to do it

George Skelton writes, “State politicians have done something laudable, and it has gone unheralded. They haven’t even bragged about it themselves. So, here’s some heralding.  They’ve authorized spending about $5 billion on drought-related water projects without charging it on the credit card.  They’re going to pay cash. That will save taxpayers roughly twice the projects’ cost for tacked-on interest.  Normally, the politicians pay for water endeavors with borrowed money. It’s exceedingly rare when projects are funded with cash from the general fund, the state’s main banking account. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here: California is spending billions on drought-related projects. And it’s not borrowing to do it

California fire season is over. Flash floods are next. It doesn’t have to be this way

Benje Williams, co-founder of Understory, a nonprofit with a mission to restore forest landscapes, writes, “As Cal Fire works quickly to identify burned out areas most susceptible to flash flooding and rockfall from the recent heavy rains, I can’t help but think it doesn’t have to be this way.  A few weeks ago, I was driving through a cemetery of charcoaled trees in what used to be thriving Northern California forest. “It’s a moonscape,” the forest manager with me said, staring out her driver seat window. “Even the soil has been scorched.” We were only 20 miles south of my Placer County hometown of Auburn, but I’d never seen anything like this.   “It could take 500 years for this ecosystem to return.” And the worst part, she continued, squinting into the sun, is that we could have stopped this. It didn’t have to burn. “But everyone was focused on saving houses, so that’s where the resources went.”  … ”  Continue reading from the San Francisco Chronicle here: California fire season is over. Flash floods are next. It doesn’t have to be this way

Today’s featured articles …

GUEST COMMENTARY: Our Enduring Water Supply: Are the Answers to California’s Water Problems Obvious?

Written by Robert Shibatani

Is there a water supply problem in California?

To answer such a question, much depends on who one asks.  For in the politically ideological and highly volatile world that is California water, we would likely hear many answers to such a question, each steeped in their own biases, background, and seeming agendas.  All these opinions would have merit, but to what extent would they be based on reality and more specifically, hydrologic reality?

Click here to read this guest commentary.

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In regional water news and commentary today …

NORTH COAST

Saving salmon and ensuring water justice in the Lower Klamath

The group Save California Salmon is taking many approaches to fulfilling its name. Those include a new podcast about water justice, a continually hot topic in California and elsewhere.  The most recent episode of the West Coast Water Justice podcast features Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy, the Chair of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University (she is Hupa, Karuk, Yurok, and enrolled in the Hoopa Valley Tribe). We discuss water justice in the context of the Klamath Basin with Dr. Baldy and with Regina Chichizola, Co-Director of Save California Salmon.” Listen at Jefferson Public Radio here: Saving salmon and ensuring water justice in the Lower Klamath

Shasta-Trinity National Forest announces ‘prescribed fire season’

The Shasta-Trinity National Forest plans to initiate prescribed fire operations this fall and winter as weather patterns shift to cooler temperatures and wetter conditions. The forest recognizes the significant impacts that have occurred as part of the 2021 summer fire season and the extreme conditions that existed throughout much of the summer. Current fuels and fire behavior metrics have moderated significantly and will continue to moderate as days become shorter, evenings cooler and wetter weather approaches. The decision to implement a specific prescribed fire project accounts for the current weather and fuels conditions, the predicted weather conditions, and resource availability. … ”  Read more from the Redheaded Blackbelt here: Shasta-Trinity National Forest announces ‘prescribed fire season’

Uncertainty over Potter Valley Power Plant, Eel River diversions continues to grow

An equipment failure has shut down PG&E’s 1908 Potter Valley power plant indefinitely, adding uncertainty to the future of Eel River diversions that have augmented the Russian River for more than a century.  The transformer failure means that, even if the next few winters are rainy and wet, it still may not be possible to refill Lake Mendocino, which is at critically low levels, because supplemental water would be needed from the Eel River to do so.  An inoperable plant would also add substantial complexity to efforts by regional stakeholders to carve out a future for the project that would ensure continued water transfers critical to sustaining water supplies for well over 600,000 people in Sonoma and Mendocino counties. … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here: Uncertainty over Potter Valley Power Plant, Eel River diversions continues to grow

SACRAMENTO VALLEY

Butte County Supervisors to talk Miocene Canal acquisition

Discussions on Butte County’s potential to acquire the Miocene Canal are set to continue Tuesday during the Board of Supervisors meeting.  According to the related agenda report, the county has been reviewing information related to the canal with help from outside consultants.  The upper and middle portions of the canal were destroyed in the Camp Fire, ultimately halting all connected hydro-power operations.  “As the cost of repairs and operation has become a prohibitive factor, PG&E is actively pursuing an entity to acquire the Upper and Middle- portions of the Miocene Canal,” the agenda report said. … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here: Butte County Supervisors to talk Miocene Canal acquisition

Photos: Massive mudslide closes Highway 70 in Northern California

Multiple mudslides and debris flows on Sunday closed a stretch of State Route 70 within the Dixie Fire burn scar in Butte and Plumas counties, about 170 miles northeast of San Francisco.  As heavy rain soaked the region, the highway was shut down in the Feather River Canyon, between Jarbo Gap and Greenville, an historic Plumas County town that was devoured by the Dixie Fire in August. Photojournalist Brandon Clement posted dramatic photos and a drone video showing a section of Highway 70 covered in rock and mud near the town of Tobin. ... ”  Read more from the SF Gate here: Photos: Massive mudslide closes Highway 70 in Northern California

The records are in: Here’s how much rain fell Sunday from Sacramento’s ‘bomb cyclone’ storm

It’s official: More rain fell Sunday than any other day in Sacramento’s recorded history, the National Weather Service confirmed on a waterlogged Monday morning. The bomb cyclone and atmospheric river storm striking Northern California exceeded forecast expectations, bombarding the capital with more than 5 inches in 24 hours. The official mark from 1 a.m. Sunday to 1 a.m. Monday at the weather service’s city station near Sacramento State was 5.44 inches, gushing past the previous record of 5.28 inches, which had stood since April 20, 1880. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here: The records are in: Here’s how much rain fell Sunday from Sacramento’s ‘bomb cyclone’ storm

Sacramento’s newly built McKinley Vault full after Sunday storm

The McKinley Park Water Vault, a recently finished East Sacramento construction project met with mixed reactions, is full after recent days of rain filled up the 6-million gallon container.  Photos sent to KCRA 3 show flooded streets near where the underground vault lies.  Carlos Eliason, a spokesperson for the City of Sacramento, said the vault is built for a 10-year-storm, yet Sunday’s rainfall is being estimated as a 100-year-storm. He said flooding would have been much worse had the vault not taken in some of that rainfall. … ”  Read more from KCRA here: Sacramento’s newly built McKinley Vault full after Sunday storm

NAPA/SONOMA

‘Atmospheric river’ lashes the North Bay, bringing flooding, power outages and water rescues

A devastating “bomb cyclone” pummeled the West Coast Sunday, leaving North Bay residents to scramble from rising waters to dry ground, water rescue crews to pluck stranded individuals to safety and tens of thousands of others to sit for hours in the dark without power. It was the most powerful storm in more than a generation, experts say.  A torrent of rain, fueled by what meteorologists described as an “atmospheric river,” wreaked havoc starting Saturday night, worsening throughout the day before easing locally Sunday evening.  At a time when so many have prayed for rain during a drought-stricken year, the storm surpassed its forecasted strength, unleashing driving sheets of rain throughout the day. … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here: ‘Atmospheric river’ lashes the North Bay, bringing flooding, power outages and water rescues

BAY AREA

Marin Municipal Water District tightens usage restrictions

Most Marin County residents will be prohibited from turning on their sprinklers and drip irrigation systems under new drought restrictions starting in December.  The Marin Municipal Water District board voted unanimously Tuesday to adopt an ordinance that bans residents from using outdoor irrigation systems including overhead sprinklers and drip irrigation from Dec. 1 through May 31. Hand spot watering using a hose and spray nozzle or a watering can is still allowed.  Anyone who violates the rules will receive an initial warning letter, then a $25 fine for a second violation and a $250 fine for further violations. … ”  Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here: Marin Municipal Water District tightens usage restrictions

Marin commentary: County leaders failed by approving Dipsea Ranch without full report

Judy Schriebman, member of the Sierra Club Marin Group Executive Committee, Watershed Alliance of Marin and Gallinas Watershed Council, writes, “The headwaters of the Redwood Creek watershed, above Muir Woods National Monument and adjacent to Mount Tamalpais State Park and the historic Dipsea Trail, are not only treasured by Marin residents but by visitors from all over the world.  Marin County officials, though, appear not to care. County planners used a shortcut to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) regarding a newly approved subdivision, called Dipsea Ranch, which would essentially allow up to four very large expensive houses and up to 12 total new homes in this internationally recognized biodiversity hotspot.  I believe the Board of Supervisors acted in violation of CEQA when it approved Dipsea Ranch with only a superficial initial study, rather than the legally required environmental impact report (EIR). ... ”  Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here: Marin commentary: County leaders failed by approving Dipsea Ranch without full report

Atmospheric river creates havoc around Bay Area

Driving rain and fierce winds battered Northern California on Sunday and filled the sky with a dense, dark curtain as rivers climbed their banks, downed trees and new mini-lakes snarled Bay Area traffic and the threat of massive debris flows caused evacuations in San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties.  Danger from potential debris flows caused by sodden earth in the burn scars from last year’s devastating wildfires led officials to issue evacuation orders in parts of San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties where the CZU fire complex burned through last year. … ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here: Atmospheric river creates havoc around Bay Area

Lake of water covers 880 near Fremont, southbound fully closed

What looked like a massive lake of water covered a section of Interstate 880 in Fremont Monday morning, creating a traffic mess. A potent atmospheric river drenched the San Francisco Bay Area Sunday into Monday and flooded the highway, forcing it to close today after 3 a.m.  ABC 7 said that at least a half dozen cars were stuck in the water and several vehicles were towed Monday morning. … ”  Read more from SF Gate here: Lake of water covers 880 near Fremont, southbound fully closed

Parts of San Mateo county pummeled with heavy rain, flooding

The atmospheric river that brought drenching rain and high winds across Northern California was causing no shortage of problems in San Mateo County Sunday night.  Late Sunday night, there were reports of flash flooding near the BART station in Millbrae.  The Millbrae exit off southbound Highway 101 just south of the San Francisco International Airport was completely flooded, with a nearby roadway turning into a river. … ”  Read more from CBS San Francisco here: Parts of San Mateo county pummeled with heavy rain, flooding

Huge Bay Area ranch gets new owner after odyssey of deal efforts, wildfire

Aborted real estate deals and a wildfire were among the twists and turns that preceded a land purchase that is poised to preserve the pristine and vast N3 Cattle Co. ranch in the Bay Area.  Through a foundation and an affiliate, William Brown, an East Bay businessman, rancher and corporate executive, has bought the vast Livermore-area N3 Cattle ranch, which at 79 square miles is larger than San Francisco’s 47 square miles.  William Brown Foundation and WEB Ranch, which are both headed up by Brown, are the official new owners of the N3 Cattle properties. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here: Huge Bay Area ranch gets new owner after odyssey of deal efforts, wildfire

SEE ALSO: Atmospheric River: San Francisco Bay Area Takes Wild One Day Ride From Extreme Drought To Flooded Streets, from CBS San Francisco

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY

State rebuffs Kettleman City’s pleas for minimum water supplies in 2022

State water regulators have a harsh message for Kings County’s tourist stop-over town of Kettleman City: pray for rain.  The town, which sits at the intersection of Highway 41 and Interstate 5, is more than a popular stopping point between San Francisco and Los Angeles.  It’s home to a highly-impoverished community of farmworkers facing dire straits over its water supply. … ”  Read more from the San Joaquin Valley Sun here: State rebuffs Kettleman City’s pleas for minimum water supplies in 2022

Tehachapi: Even with rain, 2022 water outlook is grim

“Many local people check weather forecasts for Tehachapi as they prepare for their day. But Tom Neisler looks northward, checking to see what Mother Nature might be bringing to Oregon.  As general manager of the Tehachapi-Cummings County Water District, Neisler knows that local water fortunes depend in large part on weather systems moving out of the Pacific Northwest toward Northern California and specifically the Feather River Basin. That’s because the water that is eventually delivered to the district and other water agencies from the Bay Area to San Diego by the State Water Project begins with precipitation — rain and snow — in the Feather River watershed. … ”  Read more from Tehachapi News here: Tehachapi: Even with rain, 2022 water outlook is grim

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Residents sue over foul stench in Dominguez Channel that continues to plague Carson, surrounding areas

After nearly three weeks of breathing noxious fumes, a group of Carson-area residents on Friday filed legal claims against a warehouse owner and lessee, alleging that they helped bring about the intense foul odor that’s been lingering over their city.  The lawsuit, filed with Los Angeles Superior Court, alleges that Art Naturals, a Gardena-based beauty supply company, stored ethanol-based hand sanitizers at a warehouse in Carson and that these products got into the channel after a fire broke out at the warehouse on Sept. 30.  Warehouse owner Liberty Property and its parent company Prologis were also named defendants in the suit. ... ”  Read more from KTLA here: Residents sue over foul stench in Dominguez Channel that continues to plague Carson, surrounding areas

Orange County: California water district moves ahead with PFAS treatment systems

Beginning in 2019, multiple retail water providers in Orange County, California, elected to shut down several dozen groundwater wells because they were found to contain low levels of a class of contaminants known as perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances. In a region that depends heavily on groundwater for its water supplies, the closures have proved expensive, as the affected water agencies have had to rely even more than they typically do on costly imported water from California’s State Water Project and the Colorado River.  Following an extensive study of various methods of removing PFAS from drinking water, the Orange County Water District recently began operations at the first of more than 30 planned PFAS treatment facilities. Buoyed by a large low-interest loan from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the OCWD is moving ahead with its expedited program to design and construct the remaining treatment systems. … ”  Read more from Civil Engineering Source here: Orange County: California water district moves ahead with PFAS treatment systems

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Along the Colorado River …

Southwest states facing tough choices about water as Colorado River diminishes

This past week, California declared a statewide drought emergency. It follows the first-ever federal shortage declaration on the Colorado River, triggering cuts to water supplies in the Southwest. The Colorado is the lifeblood of the region. It waters some of the country’s fastest-growing cities, nourishes some of our most fertile fields and powers $1.4 trillion in annual economic activity. The river runs more than 1,400 miles, from headwaters in the Rockies to its delta in northern Mexico where it ends in a trickle. Seven states and 30 Native American tribes lie in the Colorado River Basin. Lately, the river has been running dry due to the historically severe drought.  The majestic, meandering Colorado River that cut through these red cliffs, carving the Grand Canyon, is a wonder of nature and human ingenuity. … ”  Read more from 60 Minutes here: Southwest states facing tough choices about water as Colorado River diminishes

A river’s right to flow

” …Across the United States and the world, state and federal laws require that water managers maintain flows in rivers to support endangered species and to ensure that farms and cities have adequate supplies. But until recently, rivers rarely had water rights of their own. Their value lay simply in their ability to transport water to others, no matter the cost to the rivers themselves or the ecosystems they support. Now, as water managers, Indigenous communities, and environmental groups pioneer laws and policies that keep water in rivers for the rivers’ sake, that’s beginning to change.  … ”  Read more from Biographic here: A river’s right to flow

From sky to bedrock, researchers near Crested Butte are resetting what we know about water in the West

Eight white shipping containers, instruments spouting from the tops of some and a generator humming away in another, sit in the East River valley, on the outskirts of this mountain town, pulling data out of the air.  The containers, a “mobile atmospheric observatory,” will gather bits of information over the next two years about the winds and clouds and rain and snow and heat and cold above the silvery and serpentine waterway as it slides past the gray granite dome of Gothic Mountain on its way to the Colorado River. “It is like a satellite, but on the ground looking up,” said Heath Powers, who oversees the atmospheric observatory program operated by the U.S. Department of Energy. “It’s a traveling scientific carnival.” … ”  Read more from the Colorado Sun here: From sky to bedrock, researchers near Crested Butte are resetting what we know about water in the West

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In national water news today …

Clean Water Act protections restored after lawsuit

A Trump-era change to the 1971 Clean Water Act which restricted state and tribal voices in large water projects has been overturned by a federal court.  The changes previously gave the federal government sole control over large, water-related projects. Under the new ruling, states and tribes can once again have input into these projects, such as hydropower, fuel pipelines and wetland development. Sangye Ince-Johannsen is an attorney at the Eugene-based Western Environmental Law Center. His group sued the Environmental Protection Agency over the Trump-era policy. He says the section of the Clean Water Act in question recognizes that local voices provide an important balance to development interests. … ”  Read more from Jefferson Public Radio here: Clean Water Act protections restored after lawsuit

CRS In Focus: Reclamation Water Storage Projects: Section 4007 of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act

Congress created a new authority for the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation, part of the Department of the Interior) to build new water storage projects in Section 4007 of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (WIIN Act; P.L. 114322). The authority provides federal support for the construction of new and augmented surface water storage projects in the 17 arid reclamation states. As of October 2021, Congress had appropriated $603 million for these projects, and Reclamation had allocated (and Congress had approved) $511 million to 13 projects in 3 states. Allocation of remaining appropriations is subject to further congressional action. … ”  Continue reading from the Congressional Research Service here: CRS In Focus: Reclamation Water Storage Projects: Section 4007 of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act

Study: PFAS Present In Almost 42,000 Sites Around U.S.

Federal legislators are still coming to grips with a class of drinking water contaminants that has long been top of mind for treatment operations around the country — one that has just been found at tens of thousands of additional sites throughout the U.S.  “Toxic chemicals known as PFAS exist in almost 42,000 sites around the U.S.,” The Hill reported. “The research published … found tens of thousands of potential point sources for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances contamination around the country… They found numerous previously known PFAS sites in samples of water downstream from manufacturing facilities.” … ”  Continue reading from Water Online here: Study: PFAS Present In Almost 42,000 Sites Around U.S.

EPA finally has an action plan to improve water infrastructure and sanitation for US tribes

Hoping to step up the federal government’s response to long-standing water issues facing Native American communities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released an “action plan” earlier this month that will seek solutions to the many barriers tribes have to running water and wastewater services.  The plan will guide the EPA Office of Water as it works with federally recognized tribes to implement the plan, which was prepared with input from the National Tribal Water Council, an EPA-funded advisory group. Priorities include the creation of federal baseline water-quality standards under the Clean Water Act. … ”  Read more from The Grist here: EPA finally has an action plan to improve water infrastructure and sanitation for US tribes

Report: Plastic is on track to become a bigger climate problem than coal

Plastic permeates the oceans, clutters landfills, and threatens to create a “near-permanent contamination of the natural environment,” according to researchers. As if that weren’t bad enough, it is also a major contributor to climate change.  A new report from the advocacy group Beyond Plastics says that emissions from the plastic industry could overtake those from coal-fired power plants by the end of this decade. At every step of its life cycle, the report said, plastic causes greenhouse gas emissions that are jeopardizing urgent climate goals and harming marginalized communities. … ”  Read more from The Grist here: Report: Plastic is on track to become a bigger climate problem than coal

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More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

Conway Summit, early morning in the Eastern Sierra. Photo taken October 9, 2021 by Jay Huang

In California water news this weekend …

  • Grand finale bomb cyclone brewing at end of West Coast storm parade
  • Strong atmospheric river to bring fire season-ending and drought-mitigating heavy rain to NorCal, but also high risk of burn area flooding/debris flows
  • Relief? Worry? Jubilation? Western US residents react to the incoming bomb cyclone
  • Atmospheric Rivers can be good but they have an ugly side
  • A ‘triple play’ of weather hazards will unfold this week across the US
  • Yes, people are now trading and investing in water as a commodity
  • Big tech data centers spark worry over scarce Western water
  • Unchecked oil and gas wastewater threatens California groundwater
  • Will a La Niña winter improve the drought in Northern California? It’s complicated
  • Free platform tracks agricultural water across West
  • After California wildfire, thousands of trees to be removed
  • Two Basin Partnership pursues ‘Plan B’ for Scott Dam removal
  • Bay Area: ‘Dirt broker’ gets year of probation for Clean Water Act violation
  • New research shows most Americans are unaware of their daily water consumption
  • Judge nixes Trump-era rule limiting review of water projects
  • And more …

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Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

NOTICE: of Petition for Long-Term Transfer per Stevinson Water District and East Side Canal & Irrigation Company License 5940

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES: NRCS Announces Conservation Funding Opportunities for 2022

NOTICE: California Water Commission public workshops to explore well-managed groundwater trading programs

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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