WEEKLY WATER NEWS DIGEST for Sept. 12-17: Life history of historical salmon in the Delta, Water data and building resilience, plus all the top water news of the week

A wrap-up of posts published on Maven’s Notebook this week …

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This week’s featured articles …

BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Insights into the life history and habitat use of historical salmon in the Bay-Delta Watershed

Chinook salmon have long thrived in California’s variable climate, including prolonged drought periods, by utilizing the historical Delta’s vast habitat mosaic and their adaptable life history.  However, changes to the estuary from reclamation and development as well as climate change threaten the long-term survival of Central Valley chinook salmon.

While surveys and geochemical tools have provided crucial insights for salmon populations in California, these data were collected after significant population declines and the construction of dams that blocked access to a significant portion of their historic habitat.  As a result, these data and tools may miss key aspects of potential salmon life history.

At the 2021 Bay-Delta Science Conference, Dr. Malte Willmes, a postdoc at UC Santa Cruz and NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, presented the findings of a study where researchers applied a suite of morphological and geochemical tools to chinook salmon otoliths collected from an archaeological site predating the Delta’s development.  The study showcases the potential for archaeological fish remains to provide unique insights into past salmon populations to guide future conservation, management, and recovery.

Click here to read this article.


WATER DATA SUMMIT: Secretary Crowfoot discusses resilience, partnerships, and transforming our water systems to meet the challenges ahead

The California Data Collaborative (CaDC) is a network of water professionals collaborating to create tools and applied research supporting planning and analysis to support water management.  The CaDC is governed by water agencies and powered by technologists, and, according to their website, the CaDC sees data and technology as a tool to realize a more reliable, resilient, and sustainable water industry.  The CaDC advances their mission through committees, workshops, webinars, and the annual California Water Data Summit.

The sixth annual California Water Data Summit was held in August of 2021 with the theme, “Expect the Unexpected.”  The keynote speaker was Secretary of Natural Resources Wade Crowfoot, a position he has been in no less than three times before, including the very first Water Data Summit held at Stanford in 2016.

Click here to read this article.

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In California water news this week …

Fresno votes to fight share of Friant-Kern Canal repairs, possibly jeopardize water supply

Following months of hydrologic saber-rattling, Fresno lawmakers voted 4-2 to sue Friant Water Authority over a request for payment to fund repairs to the Friant-Kern Canal in the south Valley.  The legal brinkmanship, which centers on a relatively small sum – roughly $2.5 million, could have far-reaching consequences by putting the water supply of California’s fifth-largest city in jeopardy. … ”  Read more from the San Joaquin Valley Sun here: Fresno votes to fight share of Friant-Kern Canal repairs, possibly jeopardize water supply

Farmland repurposing program awaits Gov. Newsom’s OK

A bill that would have created a program to help farmers find new life for farmland idled by coming groundwater restrictions had its own phoenix moment last week in the Legislature when it was simultaneously killed and reborn — this time with money.  AB 252, authored by Assemblymembers Robert Rivas (D-Salinas) and Rudy Salas (D-Bakersfield), died in the state Senate last week but much of its content was reborn in a budget bill with $50 million attached. … ”  Read more from SJV Water here: Farmland repurposing program awaits Gov. Newsom’s OK

New opportunities for trading surface water in the Sacramento Valley under SGMA

New groundwater agencies in the Sacramento Valley are currently finalizing plans to manage their groundwater basins for long-term balance, as required by the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA). Successful stewardship demands good information not only about groundwater conditions, but also about surface water availability. To help build shared understanding of surface water for agriculture—the valley’s main water-using sector—we produced a new dataset showing how access to this vital resource varies across irrigated farmland in the Sacramento Valley and the Delta. This effort builds on previous PPIC work in the San Joaquin Valley, making it now possible to assess surface water conditions across the entire Central Valley. … ”  Continue reading at the PPIC here: New opportunities for trading surface water in the Sacramento Valley under SGMA

Policy brief: Improving California’s water market

The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) requires local water users to bring their groundwater basins into balance by the 2040s.  Water markets could play a key role in helping communities adapt to SGMA and stave off the worst effects of reduced groundwater pumping.  Good design is key to creating effective and responsible water markets that support low-cost trading and banking while protecting third parties from harm.  Water markets are currently hampered by a range of stumbling blocks, but thoughtful, concerted action can address these challenges and help the state build resilience.”  Read the full policy brief from the PPIC here: Policy brief: Improving California’s water market

California’s disappearing salmon

Photo by Steve Martarano

Helltown, Calif. — The name doesn’t seem to fit this quiet place set above a gentle swerve in Butte Creek, just an old span of bridge, some rusted-out mining equipment manufactured before this state was officially a state, and a seldom-used house.  But the harsh reality becomes apparent quickly, a smell on a hot, thin wind.  It is the stench from piles of rotting Chinook salmon carcasses on the creek banks and from the upside-down bodies of others snagged, already dead, on the creek’s pale rocks. For centuries, spring-run Chinook salmon, among California’s most iconic fish, would rest for weeks in these historically cold waters after their brutal upstream journey. Then they would lay eggs and, finally, perish to complete one of nature’s most improbable life cycles.  No longer. What once was a place where life began is now one of untimely death. … ”  Continue reading from the Washington Post here: California’s disappearing salmon

The West’s historic drought in 3 maps

More than 94 percent of the West drought this week, according to the US Drought Monitor, with six states entirely in drought status: California, Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, and Montana.  Parts of the West saw record-setting rainfall that brought some slight relief to the region, but most areas remain dry.  Against the backdrop of climate change-fueled drought, wildfires have charred nearly 6 million acres of vegetation across the region. Fire experts say that dry and windy conditions create a prime environment for wildfires to spark and spread.  Scientists say the multi-year drought is a clear sign of how the climate crisis is affecting not only the weather, but water supply, food production and electricity generation. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here: The West’s historic drought in 3 maps

Some beneficial North Coast rain this weekend, though wind-related fire weather concerns elsewhere. Plus: thoughts about the rainy season to come…

Dr. Daniel Swain writes, ” … I’m happy to report a pretty high chance of significant rainfall (without lightning!) this weekend along the immediate North Coast (Eureka-Arcata corridor will likely get a nice soaking) as a fairly strong early season atmospheric river makes landfall across the Pacific Northwest. As expected, recent model ensemble predictions have backed off somewhat on the amount and southern extent of the precipitation in California. The northern quarter of NorCal, including the interior, is still likely to see some wetting rains (0.1-0.3 inches), and some sprinkles/light showers are likely as far south as about the I-80 corridor. There could be some wet windshields, and maybe even a puddle or two, as far south as the North Bay on Saturday. … Read the full post at Weather West here:  Some beneficial North Coast rain this weekend, though wind-related fire weather concerns elsewhere. Plus: thoughts about the rainy season to come…

Rising seas will change the coast and the groundwater beneath your feet

While concerns over sea-level rise have typically focused on the ocean washing over previously dry land, higher seas also raise the coastal groundwater table — and that could expose far more Californians and their property to climate-change effects than overland flooding.  Miami is already experiencing such groundwater flooding. The Atlantic Ocean has risen enough that it routinely pushes subterranean water levels so they breach the land’s surface in some neighborhoods there on a daily basis, U.S. Geological Survey coastal geologist Patrick Barnard told the state Coastal Commission in a multi-agency presentation on the issue Sept. 8.  “Low-lying areas like ports and reclaimed estuaries — like we have in northern Orange County and the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach — have very shallow groundwater today and by the end of the century, it will become even more of an issue,” Barnard said. … ”  Read more from the San Bernardino Sun here: Rising seas will change the coast and the groundwater beneath your feet

What’s toxic algae and could it really have killed an entire California family hiking near Yosemite?

For those of us who spend time outside, the sight of stagnant, murky, greenish water instantly raises concern. We recognize that it’s potentially harmful algae, so we steer clear, keep our pets away and we definitely don’t swim in it or drink it. At this point, there have been no confirmed reports of humans dying from toxic algae.  But last month, after a California hiking family mysteriously died on a trail near Yosemite National Park, officials pointed to toxic algae as a prime suspect. The idea of that was as strange as it was terrifying, particularly because John Gerrish and his wife, Ellen Chung, were experienced hikers, and just out for a day trip with their 1-year-old child Miju and dog Oski. ... ”  Read more from SF Gate here: What’s toxic algae and could it really have killed an entire California family hiking near Yosemite?

Amid western blazes, prescribed fire is keeping some forests resilient

With more than 217,000 acres burned as of September 8, the Caldor Fire southwest of Lake Tahoe has left swaths of the Sierra Nevada severely devastated. More than 900 structures have been destroyed, including virtually the entire town of Grizzly Flats.  But within the fire’s massive footprint stand patches of green, living trees. One looks like a finger poking into the eastern edge of the fire, along Caples Creek and around Caples Lake. That expanse of vitality overlaps extensively with an 8,800-acre area that had been treated in 2019 with prescribed burning, a tactic practitioners say can make fire-adapted forests less susceptible to catastrophic blazes, and limiting the threat they pose to people. … ”  Read more from Bloomberg here: Amid western blazes, prescribed fire is keeping some forests resilient

Prescribed burns could help reduce California’s wildfires. A new bill could help make planned fires more frequent

After decades of fire suppression in California, prescribed burns have regained traction as one method to boosting the resilience of forests during catastrophic wildfires.  California passed Senate Bill 332 last week, which would change liability laws around setting prescribed burns. Advocates hope that this will encourage more individuals to set prescribed burns, which are planned fires aimed at managing forest land and reducing fuel loads that frequently lead to large wildfires, throughout the state. The bill now sits on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk; he has until the end of October to decide its fate. … ”  Read more from Capital Public Radio here: Prescribed burns could help reduce California’s wildfires. A new bill could help make planned fires more frequent

Commentary: Climate change is bankrupting California’s ecosystems

Martha Davis, former assistant general manager for policy at the Inland Empire Utilities Agency and former executive director of the Mono Lake Committee, writes, “For decades, scientists have warned that climate change would disrupt almost every natural life-sustaining system on our planet.   What have we done about it? We’ve dithered. We refuse to believe the evidence, or rail against the cost and inconvenience of change, or hope the problem will just go away.  But global warming is not going away. Last month, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued its most alarming report yet: Earth is on the edge of ecological bankruptcy.  That’s what California is facing this summer with record heat, severe drought, record fires, snow sublimation, record low reservoir levels, dry wells, communities without safe drinking water, deaths of salmon and whales, poisonous algae growth in lakes and streams, and record glacier melt. … ”  Read more from Cal Matters here:  Climate change is bankrupting California’s ecosystems

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In regional water news this week …

Sediment loading from Bootleg Fire could be an ‘ecological disaster’

Though it may seem like the Bootleg Fire’s damage has already been done after crews contained the blaze last month, the 647 square mile scar spells trouble for the entire Klamath Basin once the wet season arrives. If actions aren’t taken quickly to protect streams and drainages in the burn area, water quality in Upper Klamath Lake — and the endangered c’waam and koptu that call it home — could suffer.  For decades, suckers have been plagued by excessive phosphorus loading into the lake through its main tributaries — the Sprague, Williamson and Wood rivers. Though the Upper Basin is naturally rich in phosphorus due to its volcanic soils, land use changes and agricultural practices have channelized streams, reduced natural water storage and accelerated riparian erosion, all of which increases the amount of nutrient-carrying sediment flowing into Upper Klamath Lake. ... ”  Read more from the Herald & News here: Sediment loading from Bootleg Fire could be an ‘ecological disaster’

Critically low flows prompt emergency curtailment orders for Scott, Shasta Rivers; More curtailments in the works

With record low flows in the Scott and Shasta Rivers threatening the survival of multiple fish species, the State Water Resources Control Board today ordered right holders to stop diverting water to ensure supplies for human health and livestock needs and to protect fish.  [Friday]’s orders follow the emergency regulation adopted by the State Water Board on August 17, in response to acute water shortages, which took effect August 30. The curtailment orders today were sent to approximately 2,380 water right holders in the Scott and Shasta River watersheds. … ”  Continue reading this press release from Maven’s Notebook here: Critically low flows prompt emergency curtailment orders for Scott, Shasta Rivers; More curtailments in the works

Fort Bragg upgrades its water emergency to Stage 4 as Noyo River at virtual standstill

Continuing low flows in the Noyo River have prompted the city of Fort Bragg to once again upgrade its drought emergency level.  On Monday, the Fort Bragg City Council unanimously approved upgrading the emergency from a Stage 3 to a Stage 4 water crisis, which will require residents and businesses to conserve an additional 10% of water, bringing their total reduction in water use to about 30% to 40% of a normal year. Some new rules, like a ban on watering your lawn or washing your car outside of a commercial facility, will also go into effect. … ”  Read more from the Mendocino Voice here: Fort Bragg upgrades its water emergency to Stage 4 as Noyo River at virtual standstill

At least two trucks now hauling water from Ukiah to the Mendocino Coast

At least two large trucks are now hauling more than 20,000 gallons of water from Ukiah to the Mendocino Coast, Ukiah City Manager Sage Sangiacomo reported this week.  Sangiacomo said the first delivery of water from Ukiah to Fort Bragg, which will be treating the water and making it available to people making water deliveries on the coast, began Sept. 8 “with a single truck, carrying about 5,000 gallons of water, but the truck was able to make two trips for about 10,000 gallons a day.”  As of Sept. 14, Sangiacomo said a “second certified water truck is in service, bringing the daily haul volume to approximately 23,000 gallons.” If and when more trucks begin hauling, Sangiacomo said the daily volume could reach 55,000 gallons. … ”  Read more from the Ukiah Daily Journal here:  At least two trucks now hauling water from Ukiah to the Mendocino Coast

Mount Shasta is nearly snowless, a rare event that is helping melt the mountain’s glaciers

Deep in the northern California wilderness, nestled among rolling hills and magnificent pines, the Mount Shasta volcano towers above the landscape as a lone sentinel beckoning to those around it. Rising to 14,179 feet, Shasta is one of the tallest mountains in the Lower 48.  Given its height, snow cover is common year-round, especially after a snowy season or two. It is home to some of the largest glaciers in California and includes at least seven glaciers, some named after Native Americans in the 1800s. This year is testing the theory that snow and ice will always be found on Shasta. “Mt. Shasta has snow on the summit year-round. This summer is different,” wrote Mt. Shasta Ski Park in late August. “The glaciers that are visible from the north side of the mountain are melting VERY quickly this year.” … ”  Continue reading from the Washington Post here: Mount Shasta is nearly snowless, a rare event that is helping melt the mountain’s glaciers

A holistic approach to water management in the Sacramento River basin: Ridgetop to river mouth water management

Water resources managers and the leaders in Northern California continue to advance Ridgetop to River Mouth water management to bring this region and its people to life—the farms and ranches, the cities and rural communities, the fish, birds, and wildlife. Northern California’s water is the lifeblood for our families, the fish and wildlife that grace this region and our special way of life.  There are unique opportunities in the Sacramento River Basin to advance ridgetop to river mouth water management, which can best be envisioned by looking holistically at: 1) headwaters and forest health, 2) floodplain reactivation for public safety and fish and wildlife, 3) sustainable groundwater management (including groundwater recharge and banking), 4) healthy soils and farms; 5) safe drinking water; and 6) vital rivers and streams. … ”  Continue reading at the Northern California Water Association here: A holistic approach to water management in the Sacramento River basin: Ridgetop to river mouth water management

Future of Lake Tahoe clarity in question as wildfires worsen

When a wildfire crested the mountains near North America’s largest alpine lake, embers and ash that zipped across a smoky sky pierced Lake Tahoe’s clear blue waters.  The evacuation order for thousands to flee their homes has been lifted, but those who returned have found black stripes of ash building up on the shoreline — a reminder that success fighting the Caldor Fire won’t insulate the resort region on the California-Nevada line from effects that outlast wildfire season.  Scientists say it’s too soon to draw conclusions about the lasting damage that record-setting wildfires will have on Lake Tahoe. But they’re not wasting time. Researchers and state officials on the Tahoe Science Advisory Council discussed future study at a meeting Thursday. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here: Future of Lake Tahoe clarity in question as wildfires worsen

Lessons from Caldor Fire may help forest restoration, lake preservation efforts

Even as flames from the Caldor Fire threatened Tahoe, scientific research efforts were already underway to learn how the historic blaze was impacting the lake’s famed water quality and clarity.  In the closing days of August, scientists from the bi-state Tahoe Science Advisory Council launched a rapid response scientific study to gather samples of smoke and ashfall from the Caldor Fire. That real-time data gathering is now supporting investigations into changes in algae growth, the presence of clarity-diminishing particles, and other ecological dynamics at play in the lake.  The League to Save Lake Tahoe is the project’s lead funder, with additional support provided by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the State of California, the State of Nevada and the Tahoe Fund. … ”  Continue reading at the Sierra Sun Times here: Lessons from Caldor Fire may help forest restoration, lake preservation efforts

El Dorado County: Millions needed to fix burned flumes

Rebuilding three burned wooden flumes with concrete will cost up to $17 million.  El Dorado Irrigation District General Manager Jim Abercrombie Sept. 8 selected Syblon Reid to rebuild Caldor Fire-burned Flumes 4, 5 and 6 totaling 725 feet. The contractor will also build an access road to them.  This emergency single-source contract is a time-and-materials contract that is not to exceed that amount. The reconstruction will include a mechanically stabilized wall and concrete flumes. … ”  Read more from the Mountain Democrat here: El Dorado County: Millions needed to fix burned flumes

Delta: Remembering a century of history at Giusti’s Place

Giusti’s Place in Walnut Grove, whether reached by vehicle or by a short walk from the nearby boat dock, was a must-stop for visitors to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region for over 100 years.  Giusti’s, in its fourth generation of family ownership, had called the historic Miller Ferry Saloon building in Walnut Grove its home since 1912. Visitors were drawn to the restaurant’s classic Italian American menu offering lunches and three-course dinners, all served with a bowl of minestrone soup. The bar and restaurant were a sight to see, with walls covered with autographed photos from the likes of Ronald Reagan, Jay Leno and Mickey Mantle, plus 1,500 baseball caps hanging from the ceiling. … ”  Read more from Comstock’s Magazine here: Remembering a century of history at Giusti’s Place

Santa Cruz: As drought worsens, local agencies seek ambitious water solutions

From the top of Newell Creek Dam, the water level of Loch Lomond Reservoir looks particularly low. Steep, gravely banks stretch between the trees and the water.  On one side of the reservoir, a crane and a drilling rig sit on floating docks, surrounded by shipping containers and other heavy machinery. The City of Santa Cruz is replacing the pipeline that brings water in and out of Loch Lomond. But the project managers worry that if the water level drops much lower, the construction equipment could get stuck.  After two dry years in a row, Loch Lomond sits at just under 60% full. The reservoir is the only major water-storage site for Santa Cruz, and it holds about a year’s worth of water when full. ... ”  Read more from Good News Santa Cruz here: Santa Cruz: As drought worsens, local agencies seek ambitious water solutions

Fresno County towns with no drinking water drown in debt while hope fades for new well

“The longer it takes for two new wells to be dug in Cantua Creek and El Porvenir in western Fresno County, the deeper in debt the towns are mired.  Now, with the drought, those well projects are in a race against dropping groundwater levels as farmers, cut off from surface water supplies, are leaning more heavily on the aquifer.  The well projects started in 2018 and aren’t scheduled to be completed until sometime next year. … ”  Read more from the Fresno Bee here: Fresno County towns with no drinking water drown in debt while hope fades for new well

Pomona wins $48 million in groundwater pollution case

A federal jury awarded the city of Pomona $48 million in damages to be paid by a foreign corporation for contaminating its groundwater with a toxic chemical mixed with fertilizer and sold to citrus farmers for decades.  On Sept. 7, the city won its case against the American subsidiary of a multi-billion dollar Chilean company, Sociedad Química y Minera de Chile, known as SQM. The case, which began in 2011, bounced between courts until the city won after presenting its full argument recently in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. … ”  Read more from the Daily Bulletin here:  Pomona wins $48 million in groundwater pollution case

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In national water news this week …

Counties urged to mobilize against shifting federal waters rule

The National Association of Counties is urging its members across the country to mobilize against a constantly-changing definition of the waters of the U.S., or WOTUS.  The most important factor is “regulatory certainty,” Adam Pugh, associate legislative director for the association, said Wednesday during a webinar about WOTUS changes.  “Knowing that you can begin a project—and knowing you won’t have to change it in four or eight years depending on the result of the presidential election—is key,” he said. … ”  Read more from Bloomberg Law here: Counties urged to mobilize against shifting federal waters rule

In response to Western drought, a flood of legislation

Las Vegas visitors can still snap selfies with the mermaids swimming among tropical fish in the Silverton Casino’s massive aquarium and gaze at the colorful dancing water displays of the iconic Bellagio fountains — for now.  But southern Nevada and much of the American West are struggling to cope with a worsening drought that has strained municipal water supplies, agricultural operations and wildlife populations. Tens of millions of Americans live in areas being punished by drought, from Oregon’s Klamath River basin to California’s Central Valley. The crisis is ramping up pressure on Capitol Hill to act even as lawmakers confront sharp partisan differences over the best ways to respond. … ”  Continue reading from Roll Call here: In response to Western drought, a flood of legislation

Dems seek ‘historic’ changes to U.S. flood program

Congressional Democrats are moving toward enacting two measures that could vastly expand access to flood insurance and give communities a more accurate picture of their flood risk through better maps.  Two provisions in a budget reconciliation bill the House Financial Services Committee approved Tuesday address long-standing shortcomings in flood protection as climate change and coastal development intensify damage from flooding.  One item provides $1 billion to launch a subsidy program to help low- and moderate-income households buy flood insurance and close the coverage gap that leaves poorer households and communities more vulnerable to flood damage. ... ”  Read more from E&E News here: Dems seek ‘historic’ changes to U.S. flood program

Republicans may abandon infrastructure bill because Pelosi ‘linked’ it with reconciliation: GOP Rep. Johnson

As Democrats charge ahead with writing their massive $3.5 trillion spending bill, which they aim to pass on a party-line vote through budget reconciliation, at least one moderate Republican is warning the bipartisan infrastructure bill may lose GOP votes because it’s too intertwined with the reconciliation bill.  “I think Nancy Pelosi did this whole process a real disservice by linking them together so strongly and she continues to do that. And that makes it very difficult to bring Republicans to the party,” Dusty Johnson, R-S.D., a member of the Problem Solvers Caucus (PSC), told Fox News Wednesday. “I think for honest, forthright fiscal conservatives, it’s hard to get excited about the trillion dollar deal if in any way it makes it more likely that the three-and-a-half trillion dollar deal passes.” … ”  Read more from Fox News here: Republicans may abandon infrastructure bill because Pelosi ‘linked’ it with reconciliation: GOP Rep. Johnson

Weekly features …

BLOG ROUND-UP: On DWR’s water supply models and drought risks; Addendum to the State drought plan: The art of the euphemism; No water rights above the law; and more …

Click here to read the blog round-up.

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Announcements, notices, and funding opportunities …

NOTICE of Proposed Emergency Rulemaking and Informative Digest – Mill Creek and Deer Creek Watersheds

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING/PUBLIC COMMENT: 2021 Triennial Review of the San Francisco Bay Basin Plan

NEPA DOCS: Sacramento Regional County Sanitation Districts Harvest Water Program Environmental Assessment

FEEDBACK REQUESTED: Delta Independent Science Board’s Water Supply Reliability Review

NOTICE: Consideration of a Drought-Related Emergency Regulation for Curtailment of Diversions in Mill Creek and Deer Creek Watersheds

NOTICE: Update on Curtailment Status of Water Rights and Claims in the Delta Watershed

NOTICE: Status Conference Ruling and Notice of Status Conference for Nevada Irrigation District and South Sutter Water District water right application

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: North Coast Coho Recovery PSN Pre-Application Workshop Recording and Presentation Available

WATER PLAN eNEWS: ~~Drought Funding~ Flood Grants~ Well Strategies~ Specialty Crops~ Water Markets~ Sierra Meadows~ Diversity Webinar~~

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ Pollution Enforcement~ Drought Funding~ DSC Meeting~ Estuary Summit~ Feedback Request~~

IEP NEWSLETTER: Zooplankton trends, Delta Juvenile Fish Monitoring Protram, Seasonal monitoring report for IEP surveys; and more …

VELES WEEKLY WATER REPORT: Technicals show Price Reversal for NQH2O. Is the worst over?

VELES WATER RESEARCH: Margining of water futures made easy

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