DAILY DIGEST, 9/17: Fresno votes to fight share of Friant-Kern Canal repairs; Revised repurposing farmland bill on Governor’s desk; Some NorCal rain possible this weekend; EPA rescinds Trump-era Clean Water guidance on Maui decision; and more …


On the calendar today …

  • PUBLIC WORKSHOP: Petitions For Reconsideration Of The Water Quality Certification For The Yuba River Development Project from 9am to 4pm.  On July 17, 2020, the Executive Director of the State Water Resources Control Board issued a water quality certification  for the Yuba River Development Project.  The State Water Board received petitions for reconsideration of the Project certification several entities. This workshop will focus on technical items raised in the petitions and will not cover legal arguments associated with the petitions.  This is a staff workshop, not a hearing.  Click here for the full notice.

In California water news today …

Fresno votes to fight share of Friant-Kern Canal repairs, possibly jeopardize water supply

Following months of hydrologic saber-rattling, Fresno lawmakers voted 4-2 to sue Friant Water Authority over a request for payment to fund repairs to the Friant-Kern Canal in the south Valley.  The legal brinkmanship, which centers on a relatively small sum – roughly $2.5 million, could have far-reaching consequences by putting the water supply of California’s fifth-largest city in jeopardy. … ”  Read more from the San Joaquin Valley Sun here: Fresno votes to fight share of Friant-Kern Canal repairs, possibly jeopardize water supply

Fresno City Council votes to sue water agency over costs to repair Friant-Kern Canal

The Fresno City Council voted Thursday to sue the Friant Water Authority for declaratory relief to protect city ratepayers for paying the price for damage to the Friant-Kern Canal allegedly caused by Tulare County farmers.  The council voted in closed session, with Councilmembers Garry Bredefeld and Luis Chavez voting no and Councilmember Esmeralda Soria abstaining. City Attorney Doug Sloan announced the vote when the council returned to its meeting from lunch. … ”  Continue reading at the Fresno Bee here: Fresno City Council votes to sue water agency over costs to repair Friant-Kern Canal

Revised repurposing farmland bill on Governor’s desk

After much wrangling over how lost farmland could be used for other purposes — and what purposes they could be — growers who lose farmland should now have a chance to receive the help they need to use their land for other plans.  The end result is a bill that has passed the state legislature that keeps much of the provisions of the original bill and also contains $50 million to help farmers use lost farmland for other purposes.  Assembly bill 252 was originally authored by Assemblymen Robert Rivas, D-Salinas, and Rudy Salas, D-Bakersfield, to help farmers repurpose their lost farmland. But the bill died after numerous changes were made to it in the Senate Appropriations Committee. The Environmental Defense Fund also sponsored AB 252. … ”  Read more from the Porterville Recorder here: Revised repurposing farmland bill on Governor’s desk

Ross: investment, cooperation needed to solve water crisis in California

Collaboration and infrastructure investment will both be needed for California to solve its water crisis, California Department of Food and Agriculture Secretary Karen Ross said at The Packer’s Sustainable Produce Summit.  The Sept. 14 panel consisted of Ross; Jeff Huckaby, president of Bakersfield, Calif.-based Grimmway Farms; and Jenet DeCosta, chief of staff for Driscoll’s, Watsonville, Calif.  Ross said growers and researchers have already made great gains in looking for the most efficient water delivery systems, such as drip irrigation, for agriculture.  “We have to figure out new ways of doing things so that we can use the water that we have, and think about how we recharge our groundwater basins,” she said. … ”  Read more from The Packer here:  Ross: investment, cooperation needed to solve water crisis in California

‘In the Struggle’ chronicles the roots of California’s food justice movement

California’s San Joaquin Valley is the most agriculturally productive region in the United States, yet it is also home to some of the highest levels of poverty, pollution, and hunger.  In this fertile region, government, industry, and agriculture have worked hand-in-hand over the last century to develop the modern agribusiness model. Unlike the homestead movement of the Midwest and Great Plains, California’s plantation-style agriculture was built on the monopolization of large Spanish land grants of the mid-18th to mid-19th centuries. … ”  Continue reading from Civil Eats here: ‘In the Struggle’ chronicles the roots of California’s food justice movement

Some beneficial North Coast rain this weekend, though wind-related fire weather concerns elsewhere. Plus: thoughts about the rainy season to come…

Dr. Daniel Swain writes, ” … I’m happy to report a pretty high chance of significant rainfall (without lightning!) this weekend along the immediate North Coast (Eureka-Arcata corridor will likely get a nice soaking) as a fairly strong early season atmospheric river makes landfall across the Pacific Northwest. As expected, recent model ensemble predictions have backed off somewhat on the amount and southern extent of the precipitation in California. The northern quarter of NorCal, including the interior, is still likely to see some wetting rains (0.1-0.3 inches), and some sprinkles/light showers are likely as far south as about the I-80 corridor. There could be some wet windshields, and maybe even a puddle or two, as far south as the North Bay on Saturday. … Read the full post at Weather West here:  Some beneficial North Coast rain this weekend, though wind-related fire weather concerns elsewhere. Plus: thoughts about the rainy season to come…

SEE ALSO:

What’s toxic algae and could it really have killed an entire California family hiking near Yosemite?

For those of us who spend time outside, the sight of stagnant, murky, greenish water instantly raises concern. We recognize that it’s potentially harmful algae, so we steer clear, keep our pets away and we definitely don’t swim in it or drink it. At this point, there have been no confirmed reports of humans dying from toxic algae.  But last month, after a California hiking family mysteriously died on a trail near Yosemite National Park, officials pointed to toxic algae as a prime suspect. The idea of that was as strange as it was terrifying, particularly because John Gerrish and his wife, Ellen Chung, were experienced hikers, and just out for a day trip with their 1-year-old child Miju and dog Oski. ... ”  Read more from SF Gate here: What’s toxic algae and could it really have killed an entire California family hiking near Yosemite?

Illegal marijuana farms take West’s scarce water

Jack Dwyer pursued a dream of getting back to the land by moving in 1972 to an idyllic, tree-studded parcel in Oregon with a creek running through it. “We were going to grow our own food. We were going to live righteously. We were going to grow organic,” Dwyer said. Over the decades that followed, he and his family did just that. But now, Deer Creek has run dry after several illegal marijuana grows cropped up in the neighborhood last spring, stealing water from both the stream and nearby aquifers and throwing Dwyer’s future in doubt. From dusty towns to forests in the U.S. West, illegal marijuana growers are taking water in uncontrolled amounts when there often isn’t enough to go around for even licensed users. … ”  Read more from the Washington Post here: Illegal marijuana farms take West’s scarce water

Amid western blazes, prescribed fire is keeping some forests resilient

With more than 217,000 acres burned as of September 8, the Caldor Fire southwest of Lake Tahoe has left swaths of the Sierra Nevada severely devastated. More than 900 structures have been destroyed, including virtually the entire town of Grizzly Flats.  But within the fire’s massive footprint stand patches of green, living trees. One looks like a finger poking into the eastern edge of the fire, along Caples Creek and around Caples Lake. That expanse of vitality overlaps extensively with an 8,800-acre area that had been treated in 2019 with prescribed burning, a tactic practitioners say can make fire-adapted forests less susceptible to catastrophic blazes, and limiting the threat they pose to people. … ”  Read more from Bloomberg here: Amid western blazes, prescribed fire is keeping some forests resilient

Prescribed burns could help reduce California’s wildfires. A new bill could help make planned fires more frequent

After decades of fire suppression in California, prescribed burns have regained traction as one method to boosting the resilience of forests during catastrophic wildfires.  California passed Senate Bill 332 last week, which would change liability laws around setting prescribed burns. Advocates hope that this will encourage more individuals to set prescribed burns, which are planned fires aimed at managing forest land and reducing fuel loads that frequently lead to large wildfires, throughout the state. The bill now sits on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk; he has until the end of October to decide its fate. … ”  Read more from Capital Public Radio here: Prescribed burns could help reduce California’s wildfires. A new bill could help make planned fires more frequent

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In regional water news and commentary today …

Sediment loading from Bootleg Fire could be an ‘ecological disaster’

Though it may seem like the Bootleg Fire’s damage has already been done after crews contained the blaze last month, the 647 square mile scar spells trouble for the entire Klamath Basin once the wet season arrives. If actions aren’t taken quickly to protect streams and drainages in the burn area, water quality in Upper Klamath Lake — and the endangered c’waam and koptu that call it home — could suffer.  For decades, suckers have been plagued by excessive phosphorus loading into the lake through its main tributaries — the Sprague, Williamson and Wood rivers. Though the Upper Basin is naturally rich in phosphorus due to its volcanic soils, land use changes and agricultural practices have channelized streams, reduced natural water storage and accelerated riparian erosion, all of which increases the amount of nutrient-carrying sediment flowing into Upper Klamath Lake. ... ”  Read more from the Herald & News here: Sediment loading from Bootleg Fire could be an ‘ecological disaster’

At least two trucks now hauling water from Ukiah to the Mendocino Coast

At least two large trucks are now hauling more than 20,000 gallons of water from Ukiah to the Mendocino Coast, Ukiah City Manager Sage Sangiacomo reported this week.  Sangiacomo said the first delivery of water from Ukiah to Fort Bragg, which will be treating the water and making it available to people making water deliveries on the coast, began Sept. 8 “with a single truck, carrying about 5,000 gallons of water, but the truck was able to make two trips for about 10,000 gallons a day.”  As of Sept. 14, Sangiacomo said a “second certified water truck is in service, bringing the daily haul volume to approximately 23,000 gallons.” If and when more trucks begin hauling, Sangiacomo said the daily volume could reach 55,000 gallons. … ”  Read more from the Ukiah Daily Journal here:  At least two trucks now hauling water from Ukiah to the Mendocino Coast

Lake County officials elaborate on drinking water warning for locations on Clear Lake

Lake County Public Health on Thursday offered more information as well as clarification on an urgent advisory issued the previous night regarding drinking water taken from Clear Lake through private intakes.  On Wednesday night, Public Health Officer Dr. Gary Pace issued the following statement: “Effective immediately, people on private water systems whose tap water comes from their own private intake into the lake, in the Oaks Arm and Lower Arm of Clear Lake should not drink the water. Very high levels of cyanotoxin have been identified in these areas of the lake, and we are concerned there may be health impacts if private water systems are not effectively filtering out these toxins.” … ”  Read more from the Lake County News here: Lake County officials elaborate on drinking water warning for locations on Clear Lake

Caldor Fire survivors in Grizzly Flats grapple with lack of clean drinking water

The Caldor Fire nearly decimated the town of Grizzly Flats, destroying hundreds of homes and laying waste to its water distribution system. That’s creating additional challenges for repopulation efforts.  “We’re working our hardest to get everybody water,” said Jodi Lauther, general manager of the Grizzly Flats Community Services District, which treats and provides water for the town.  Miraculously, the treatment plant escaped the flames, but the water from the reservoir it draws from still needs to be tested.  “There’s a lot of damage,” Lauther added. … ”  Read more from KCRA here: Caldor Fire survivors in Grizzly Flats grapple with lack of clean drinking water

Future of Lake Tahoe clarity in question as wildfires worsen

When a wildfire crested the mountains near North America’s largest alpine lake, embers and ash that zipped across a smoky sky pierced Lake Tahoe’s clear blue waters.  The evacuation order for thousands to flee their homes has been lifted, but those who returned have found black stripes of ash building up on the shoreline — a reminder that success fighting the Caldor Fire won’t insulate the resort region on the California-Nevada line from effects that outlast wildfire season.  Scientists say it’s too soon to draw conclusions about the lasting damage that record-setting wildfires will have on Lake Tahoe. But they’re not wasting time. Researchers and state officials on the Tahoe Science Advisory Council discussed future study at a meeting Thursday. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here: Future of Lake Tahoe clarity in question as wildfires worsen

Lessons from Caldor Fire may help forest restoration, lake preservation efforts

Even as flames from the Caldor Fire threatened Tahoe, scientific research efforts were already underway to learn how the historic blaze was impacting the lake’s famed water quality and clarity.  In the closing days of August, scientists from the bi-state Tahoe Science Advisory Council launched a rapid response scientific study to gather samples of smoke and ashfall from the Caldor Fire. That real-time data gathering is now supporting investigations into changes in algae growth, the presence of clarity-diminishing particles, and other ecological dynamics at play in the lake.  The League to Save Lake Tahoe is the project’s lead funder, with additional support provided by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the State of California, the State of Nevada and the Tahoe Fund. … ”  Continue reading at the Sierra Sun Times here: Lessons from Caldor Fire may help forest restoration, lake preservation efforts

Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation announces launch of Forest Futures

The Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation announced it has raised more than $1 million for the launch of Forest Futures, a multi-year campaign to stimulate the region’s economy, ensure a safer and more secure future for the Tahoe area, and create an actionable path forward to healthy forests everywhere.  “After four years of convening experts, building community awareness and developing a systematic strategy, the Forest Futures campaign is prepared to take immediate action to protect Tahoe’s forests,” said Stacy Caldwell, CEO of Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation, in a news release. “The impacts of this campaign will reach far beyond the Tahoe region and across generations of our community and California. Our approach is holistic and our strategy is emergent, recognizing the interconnectedness of community with our environment and our economy; and the importance to engage and collaborate with all stakeholders. … ”  Read more from the Sierra Sun Times here: Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation announces launch of Forest Futures

Sacramento residents reduced water use by 6% in August, RWA says

Sacramento residents have reportedly reduced their water usage by 6% for August compared to the same time last year, according to the Regional Water Authority (RWA).  Amy Talbot, the RWA’s Water Efficiency Program Manager, said it’s encouraging Sacramentans are using less water considering the scorching weather and ongoing water reductions since 2013. … ”  Continue reading at Channel 10 here: Sacramento residents reduced water use by 6% in August, RWA says

Marin County’s reservoirs dip to just 36% capacity

With 88% of California in extreme or exceptional drought conditions, counties across the Bay Area are preparing for what could be several more dry years to come.  The Bay Area Council hosted a panel Thursday to discuss the current conditions, and solutions.  “Sadly, almost 45% of the state is what is characterized as exceptional drought,” Bill Sloan, a partner at Venable LLP, said. “When we get there, fields are fallowed, orchards are removed, vegetable yields go down, fires become very expensive…and on and on and on.” … ”  Read more from ABC Bay Area here: Marin County’s reservoirs dip to just 36% capacity

Marin commentary: Dangers of pulling more water from Central Valley are obvious

Independent filmmaker Kristi Denton Cohen writes, “For the Marin Municipal Water District directors to suggest we build a $65 million pipeline across the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to harvest water from the Central Valley tells me they are walking around with blinders on. We can’t keep expecting to get water from somewhere else.  You don’t have to go far to see the impacts of the drought in the Central Valley. The water is so low at Lake Oroville, the hydro plant may have to close.  The Metropolitan Water District (Los Angeles, San Diego, Orange, Ventura, Riverside and San Bernardino counties) supplies water to the millions who live in Southern California and much comes from the Central Valley. … ”  Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here: Marin commentary: Dangers of pulling more water from Central Valley are obvious

Bay Area water district officials discuss how they are weathering drought

Officials from four of the Bay Area’s largest water districts said Thursday that water storage and supply projects, conservation and political action will be required to get the region through the next few years if the current “grim” drought conditions persist.  Right now, 88% of the state is enduring “extreme” drought and 45% is suffering “exceptional” drought designations, while reservoirs and the Sierra Nevada snowpack are at historically low levels and the state cut supplies to thousands of water rights holders, including those that draw from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. … ”  Read more from NBC Bay Area here: Bay Area water district officials discuss how they are weathering drought

San Francisco: Warnings about Millennium Tower repair plans raised before work began

Days after San Francisco officials put the construction to shore up San Francisco’s leaning Millennium Tower on indefinite hold, there’s new evidence that building officials were forewarned about the dangers of the current fix.  The city’s Department of Building Inspection says it is examining an updated construction approach that engineers on the project have proposed after it was discovered pile-driving activity likely caused the luxury residential high-rise to sink another inch and lean another five inches. …  In a report to San Francisco supervisors, Karp and fellow geotechnical engineer Joshua Kardon warned that the “external asymmetrical plan” would cause “further loss of groundwater, which is likely to cause more irreparable damage to the building’s substructure.”  “I see the groundwater is dropping, which is what we said in our report,” said Karp. … ”  Read more from CBS San Francisco here: San Francisco: Warnings about Millennium Tower repair plans raised before work began

First Diablo winds of the season may arrive in Bay Area this weekend

The first Diablo winds of the season could arrive in the Bay Area beginning Sunday night and into Monday morning — though they’re unlikely to be as strong as in years past, meteorologists said.  The timeline for this year’s dry, offshore winds has come about two weeks earlier than expected, said Warren Blier, science officer for the National Weather Service. The winds — which can spread fires and smoke in new directions — typically start around the fall and come and go irregularly through the spring. … ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here: First Diablo winds of the season may arrive in Bay Area this weekend

This startup watches what SF flushes – and grows food with it

Someone likes to flush soy sauce packets down the toilet at a large Bay Area tech campus. They probably think no one is watching, but someone is.  That someone is Aaron Tartakovsky, the CEO of Epic Cleantec, a 10-person San Francisco startup that installs mini wastewater treatment systems in some of The City’s biggest and most fashionable buildings. When his startup was treating the tech company’s wastewater, Tartakovsky discovered the packets.  “You tend to be the recipient of lots of strange things when you’re sitting at the bottom of a sewer pipe,” Tartakovsky told The Examiner. “We have a flush-it-and-forget-it mentality.” ... ”  Read more from the SF Examiner here: This startup watches what SF flushes – and grows food with it

Monterey: The remote work trend should help open up vacant office space for housing, but water is in the way

As the Covid-19 pandemic stretches on in the U.S., businesses are continuing to adapt, and at least one trend looks like it will become permanent: Many employees will continue working remotely.  That will likely further depress demand for office space locally, which, even before the pandemic, was already in high supply: Unlike housing, vacant office space has long been abundant in nearly every corner of the county.  That’s why, in June 2019, Monterey City Council voted 4-1 to rezone commercial properties along the south side of Garden Road so that they can be converted into multifamily residential units. In so doing, the city would have a better chance of meeting the state-mandated goal of adding 650 housing units by 2023. … ”  Read more from Monterey Weekly here: Monterey: The remote work trend should help open up vacant office space for housing, but water is in the way

Monterey commentary: Desal health and safety

Attorney Marc Del Piero writes, “I have been receiving numerous calls from worried residents of Monterey County about the current Board of Supervisors’ proposed elimination of the health and safety protection ordinance that requires public ownership of desalination plants.  This wrong-headed proposal to dismantle public protections of our water supply will be discussed Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors. The 1989 ordinance was adopted unanimously by the Monterey County Board of Supervisors. It was adopted to protect the public’s health and safety from polluted water supplied by private parties. It was adopted to guarantee that any desalination plant was to be owned by a nonprofit public agency, would be operated without political favoritism or cronyism, would be independently regulated by the county Environmental Health Officer, and would guarantee supply redundancy. It would also comply with all public health codes, water rights laws and coastal zone regulations that were enacted to protect the public’s health and safety while protecting Monterey Bay from pollution from private outfall pipes. … ”  Continue reading at Voices of Monterey here: Desal health and safety

Cal Water: Kern River Valley terrain, geography drives up cost of water

California Water Service wants to raise the water bills for Kern River Valley customers to fund system improvements.  The company has submitted a request to the California Public Utilities Commission, Kevin McCusker, community affairs spokesman at CalWater, told the Kern Valley Sun.  The increase would raise the monthly bill of the average customer by $2.69, McCusker said. If approved, it would be effective in January 2023 at the earliest. … ”  Read more from the Kern Valley Sun here: Cal Water: Kern River Valley terrain, geography drives up cost of water

Pasadena commentary: The big dig at Hahamongna was a devilishly successful project

Columnist Larry Wilson writes, “Rare as hens’ teeth is the large government project completed not only well ahead of time, but, presumably because of that swiftness, well under budget.  And not only completed — by all accounts, nicely done.  Even those of us not employed as contractors to the powers that be know the term “close enough for government work.” (Its sister saying, “Close enough for rock ‘n’ roll,” is more a matter of merely adequate guitar tuning.)  But it looks as if the Los Angeles County Public Works’ big dig in the Arroyo Seco behind Devil’s Gate Dam, up at that big semi-rural intersection of La Canada Flintridge, Altadena and Pasadena, will have all its sediment-removal work done by the end of this month, which is over a year ahead of schedule. ... ”  Continue reading at the Pasadena Star News here: Pasadena commentary: The big dig at Hahamongna was a devilishly successful project

No more access to Lake Poway ballfield, two lots due to water project

The City of Poway is beginning construction on the first of its three planned projects to increase drinking water reliability, officials announced.  Starting Monday, the Lake Poway ballfield will be closed so two temporary tanks can be constructed. Each tank will be able to store 1.4 million gallons of treated water, according to city spokeswoman Rene Carmichael.  The closure of the ballfield, the parking lot adjacent to the volleyball court this week and, starting Monday, the Public Works parking lot off Lake Poway Road that the public used for free weekend parking are due to the creation of a temporary bypass project. It must be in place before the city’s clearwell replacement project can begin, according to Carmichael. ... ”  Read more from the San Diego Union-Tribune here: No more access to Lake Poway ballfield, two lots due to water project

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Along the Colorado River …

Arizona utility: Really wet summer follows very dry winter

The second-driest winter on record in the Salt River Project’s watershed was followed by a monsoon that the water and power utility said was the second-wettest since it started keeping records nearly 110 years ago.  The 2021 monsoon provided nearly 250,000 acre-feet (80 billion gallons) of inflow into the utility’s reservoirs on the the Salt and Verde rivers during July and August, falling just short of being the all-time wettest monsoon, Salt River Project said in a statement Wednesday. … ”  Read more from KNAU here: Arizona utility: Really wet summer follows very dry winter

Salt River Project, Valley cities studying ways to store more water amid problems with Verde River

The Colorado River is Arizona’s largest renewable water supply, but much of the Phoenix metro area is served by the Salt and Verde River reservoir system.  However, one component of that big source of water is shrinking, and Valley cities are now partnering with SRP, in a study to understand the options that are available. … ”  Read more from Fox 10 here: Salt River Project, Valley cities studying ways to store more water amid problems with Verde River

Colorado River can no longer sustain Western thirst

Back when the Colorado River Compact was being negotiated about 100 years ago, water was not viewed as a problem. Officials deemed there was plenty to go around.  Fast forward a century and the seven Colorado River Basin states – particularly the three lower basin states of California, Arizona, and Nevada – are using more than the system can sustain. Nowhere is this more evident than on the chalk-white dry rims of Lakes Mead and Powell, the two large reservoirs on the system that some fear will hit catastrophically low levels in the next couple years. … ”  Read more from the Western Farm Press here: Colorado River can no longer sustain Western thirst

Colorado River levels continue to decline. What does this mean for the future?

The Colorado River is the lifeline of the western U.S. and now it’s drying up. That’s just the beginning of the problems facing the river and those who rely on it.  Along the river, people are having a rough time with recreational sports.  “For both recreational and commercial trips that are operating here on cataract canyon, takeouts are everything,” said one local professional. Trekking down a steep ramp is the only option to get in and out of the Colorado River. It’s a ramp that used to have the capability of allowing a car to back up into the water, but the river has completely changed.  River scientists say it’s the result of decades of droughts and the creation of the reservoirs, only made worse by climate change. … ”  Read more from the Denver Channel here: Colorado River levels continue to decline. What does this mean for the future?

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In national water news today …

EPA rescinds Trump-era Clean Water guidance on Maui decision

The EPA is revoking fast-tracked guidance clarifying Trump-era Clean Water Act permitting requirements for indirect water pollution, according to an agency memorandum posted online Thursday.  The nonbinding guidance came in January, after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in County of Maui v. Hawai’i Wildlife Fund in April 2020 that the Clean Water Act’s permitting requirements extend to indirect pollution that is the “functional equivalent” of a direct discharge.  The Environmental Protection Agency finalized the guidance just over a month after it was proposed in the final weeks of the Trump administration. … ”  Read more from Bloomberg Law here: EPA rescinds Trump-era Clean Water guidance on Maui decision

SEE ALSOEPA Rescinds Previous Administration’s Guidance on Clean Water Act Permit Requirements, press release from the EPA

Irrigating crops with wastewater may be the future of farming

In response to increasing droughts, California’s CoCo San Sustainable Farm is working to find sustainable solutions to irrigate the land and sustain the local community.  As climate change increasingly impacts the agriculture sector’s access to water necessary for sufficient irrigation, CoCo San Sustainable Farm in California is exemplifying responsible and creative resource management. By redesigning conventional irrigation methods, the farm no longer relies on rainfall and snowmelt to ensure a fruitful harvest. The result is a bounty of organic food, which is donated to the local community and has a smaller water footprint than other crops. … ”  Read more from Food Tank here: Irrigating crops with wastewater may be the future of farming

Climate scientists forecast high temperatures into the fall

After a summer of blistering heat across much of the country, the hotter-than-normal conditions that have contributed to severe drought across the West are forecast to continue into the fall, scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday.  Five states had their warmest June through August in 127 years of record-keeping. Not coincidentally, two of those states — California and Oregon — experienced some of the largest fires in their history, as the high temperatures contributed to extra-dry soils and vegetation that helped fires spread quickly. … ”  Read more from the New York Times here: Climate scientists forecast high temperatures into the fall

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National water and climate update …

dmrpt-20210916

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Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

NOTICE of Proposed Emergency Rulemaking and Informative Digest – Mill Creek and Deer Creek Watersheds

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ Pollution Enforcement~ Drought Funding~ DSC Meeting~ Estuary Summit~ Feedback Request~~

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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