BLOG ROUND-UP: On DWR’s water supply models and drought risks; Addendum to the State drought plan: The art of the euphemism; No water rights above the law; and more …

On DWR’s water supply models and drought risks

Deirdre Des Jardins writes, “The Delta Independent Science Board has just released their draft Water Supply Reliability Review. We strongly agree with their recommendation on water supply system models:  “The next generation of state-sponsored water supply system models for reliability estimation should be built, updated, and evaluated by a broad consortium of state and federal agencies and external experts in order to better incorporate regional management needs and apply the best feasible science.”  Below is one experience we had with recommendations for improving DWR’s modeling of drought risks. .… ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: On DWR’s water supply models and drought risks

Could California weather a mega-drought?

Jay Lund writes, ““Mega-drought” has become a frightful “thing” in public and media discussions. In the past 1,200 years, California had two droughts lasting 120-200 years, “megadroughts” by any standard. Could the state’s water resources continue to supply enough water to drink, grow crops and provide habitat for fish with such an extreme, prolonged drought today?  Clearly, some ecosystems and rural communities would be devastated by such a drought, and it would certainly affect all California residents. But with careful management, California’s economy in many ways could substantially withstand such a severe drought.  The UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences explored this question a few years ago using computer models. … ”  Continue reading at the California Water Blog here:  Could California weather a mega-drought?

Addendum to the State Drought Plan — August 31, 2021, Part 1: the Art of the Euphemism

Tom Cannon writes, “The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) released a Central Valley Drought Contingency Plan Update on August 31, 2021, stating:: “Project operations are still tracking with the operations forecast included in the July Drought Plan addendum. August has been fairly typical, with operations primarily controlled by system-wide depletions and Delta salinity.”  This is like a dispatch from the captain of the Titanic saying: the ship was tracking course since the last report, and yes, it hit the iceberg.  As is fairly typical under such circumstances, it sunk, primarily due to the hole in the hull. … ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here: Addendum to the State Drought Plan — August 31, 2021, Part 1: the Art of the Euphemism

Addendum to the State Drought Plan – August 30, 2021, Part 2: This Is a Test(?)

Tom Cannon writes, “The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) released a Central Valley Drought Contingency Plan Update on August 31, 2021. Part of the Addendum’s section on Sacramento River Temperature Management describes bypassing Shasta Dam’s hydropower generating facilities in order to cool Shasta Reservoir releases to the lower Sacramento River:  “Reclamation performed a cold water power bypass test on August 29 to determine the feasibility of using the bypass to cool Sacramento River temperatures in the late summer and early fall. The results of this test and any potential future partial bypass will be discussed with the fishery agencies through the Sacramento River Temperature Task Group to determine the potential benefits and impacts of taking the action and ultimately whether the group recommends a partial power bypass for consideration. … ”  Continue reading at the California Fisheries blog here: Addendum to the State Drought Plan – August 30, 2021, Part 2: This Is a Test(?)

No Water Rights in CA are Above the Law, Despite SF’s Claims

Doug Obegi writes, “The current drought is highlighting many ways in which California’s water rights system is inequitable and poorly managed, but it doesn’t have to be that way.  While water users frequently claim they are exempt from the authority of the State Water Resources Control Board, the Courts have repeatedly rejected those arguments, confirming that the Board has significant authority over all water rights in California.  However, all too often the Board is prevented from exercising that authority due to political pressure, and when the Board does act, water users file litigation to try to bully the Board so they can go back to over-exploiting California’s water resources for profit. … ”  Read more from the NRDC here: No Water Rights in CA are Above the Law, Despite SF’s Claims

California Management of Coastal Environmental Issues – A Primer

Worried about a coastal issue? Confused about who has authority? The various Conservation Committee entities are a great resource. For coastal issues in LA and Orange Counties, it is important to start learning about the Coastal Act, Coastal Commission, and Coastal Conservancy. Where to start? Here is a quick primer … ”  Read more from the Sierra Club here: California Management of Coastal Environmental Issues – A Primer

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.
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