BLOG ROUND-UP: Making the best of the poor conditions in this critically dry year; State Board proposes Office of Equity; Los Angeles Regional Board: Fix our stormwater problem!; and more …

NOTE: Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints.

Making the best of the poor conditions in this critically dry year

Jessica Law writes, “Severe drought conditions are back in California. Unfortunately, that means the Lower American River is headed into what may be some of the worst summer conditions we’ve seen on the river in recent memory.  I won’t sugarcoat it. Conditions in the river will be bad. However, the Water Forum and our partners are working hard to ensure conditions are as good as they can possibly be, and to minimize harm to fish and habitat.  As you may have seen on the news, we began this year with a near-normal snowpack. In most years, the snowpack melts and feeds our lakes and rivers. This year, the snowpack disappeared in the span of several weeks, soaking into the dry soil or evaporating—perhaps foreshadowing what may turn out to be the case study for climate change impacts on our water supplies and environment.  … ”  Read more from Water Forum here:  Making the Best of the Poor Conditions in this Critically Dry Year

State Board proposes Office of Equity

California’s State Water Resources Control Board is soliciting comments on a draft resolution titled – Condemning Racism, Xenophobia, and Racial Injustice and Strengthening Commitment to Racial Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, Access, and Anti-Racism. The comment deadline is noon Monday, August 2nd.   Resolutions are generally divided into two parts. The first part is comprised of a list of Whereas and used to set the causation for the Therefore Be It Resolved portion. Much of this proposed resolution is directed at internal employment policies within the State Board. However, there are other statements within the proposed resolution that raise concerns about their impact on existing water rights.  On page five of the resolution the Whereas states California’s water rights system has been built on racism perpetuated by White Supremacy. The Therefore, Be It Resolved section directs staff to draw up a proposal by January 2022 to establish an Office of Equity and an Action Plan to implement racial equity. … ”  Continue reading from Water Wrights here: State Board proposes Office of Equity

California’s perfect storm: hot weather, low reservoirs, diminished hydro power, unreliable renewable energy

” … California currently buys 20% to 30% of its daily supplemental energy from other states. We do not produce enough of our own energy to support the state’s needs. And with the overwhelming push by the left to rid the state of natural gas production, oil, nuclear and hydro power, intermittent renewable energy cannot provide steady, reliable power for the state’s 40 million resident.  This summer’s energy needs are looking as if they will not be met as California is facing a perfect storm.  Last summer, the August 14-15, 2020 power blackouts happened when the state was short 400 MegaWatts of energy. According to our energy expert, California is currently short 1,300 MegaWatts of hydroelectric power. ... ”  Read more from the California Globe here:  Read more from California Globe here: California’s perfect storm: hot weather, low reservoirs, diminished hydro power, unreliable renewable energy

Sustainable Silicon Valley’s Water Manifesto

After decades of ignoring or debating theoretical impacts amid this overwhelming gradual buildup, we are now squarely inside of environmental bankruptcy’s “then suddenly” stage. If this were a game, we’d say Climate Change is winning big, but unfortunately this is not a game, it is an emergency. …  Across the West, we see our rivers running dry as we nervously monitor the now yearround fire season.Climate crisis means water crisis. California is under an officiallydeclared Drought Emergency. After months of record temperatures, negligible snowmelt, heat domes, atmospheric drying and desertification of soils, here we are, in a brave new world of our making, where the way we navigate our future course will directly determine the quality of our lives. Sustainable Silicon Valley’s Water Program has many threads but can be summed up by three simple ideas ... ”  Read the full water manifesto from SSV here: Sustainable Silicon Valley’s Water Manifesto

Los Angeles Regional Board: Fix our stormwater problem!

Corinne Bell writes, ” … For almost nine years, dischargers have had a free pass to pollute; they’ve been shielded from enforcement because of a “safe harbor” in the municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) permit. The Regional Board decided to include a safe harbor to give polluters time to develop Watershed Management Plans without having to fear enforcement for failing to meet water quality standards. These Plans should include rigorous schedules and detail projects that Permittees must build and maintain so that our waterways can be enjoyed by all, instead of being a source of illness for people and critters. … ”  Read more from the NRDC here: Los Angeles Regional Board: Fix our stormwater problem!

Is the Colorado River “Stress Test” stressful enough?

Brad Udall and John Fleck write, “Earlier this year, we argued in a Science magazine editorial that Colorado River forecasting must take the growing risk of climate change seriously. The latest five-year projections from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation offer a practical example of the challenge.  Published July 8 with an accompanying news release, the projections suggested that if the trends of the last 30-plus years continues, there is a 79 percent chance that Lake Powell could drop next year below elevation 3,525 – a danger zone for managing power production and releases to the Lower Basin going forward. With the reservoirs behind Hoover and Glen Canyon dams expected to drop below 30% by early 2022, these projections take on a new importance — we no longer have a huge water buffer to protect us from future low flow years.  It is stark news. But perhaps not stark enough. … ”  Read more from the Inkstain blog here: Is the Colorado River “Stress Test” stressful enough?

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.
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