BLOG ROUND-UP: Achieving water abundance; California’s water futures market slow to rise; “Legendary” Bay Delta scientist resigns from DISB; A decade of recharge; and more …

Achieving water abundance

Edward Ring writes, “As Californians face another drought, the official consensus response is more rationing. Buy washers that don’t work very well. Install more flow restrictors. Move down from a 50 gallon per person, per day limit for indoor water consumption to 40 gallons per person per day. For California’s farmers, recent legislation has not only lowered what percentage of river flow can be diverted to agriculture, but now also restricts groundwater pumping. The impact is regressive, with consequences ranging from petty and punitive to catastrophic and existential.  Wealthy homeowners pay the fines and water their lawns, while ordinary citizens are forced to obsess over every drop. Corporate farm operations navigate the countless regulatory agencies while family farmers are driven insolvent. And the worse it gets, the more the story stays the same: We have wasted water, destroyed ecosystems, and now we must embrace an era of limits. But this is a perilous path. … ”  Read more from American Greatness here:  Achieving water abundance

California’s water futures market slow to rise as it may not be meeting the real need

Richard McCann writes, “I wrote about potential problems with the NASDAQ Veles California Water Index futures market. The market is facing more headwinds as farmers are wary of participating in the cash-only markets that does not deliver physical water.  Their reluctance illustrates a deeper problem with the belief in and advocacy for relying on short-run markets to finance capital intensive industries. The same issue is arising in electricity where a quarter-century experiment has been running on whether hourly energy-only markets can deliver the price signals to maintain reliability and generate clean energy. … ”  Read more from the Economics Outside the Cube blog here: California’s water futures market slow to rise as it may not be meeting the real need

Assembly adds urgency clause to bill to save Delta Independent Science Board

Deirdre Des Jardins writes, “As detailed in our June 29 blog post, Senate Bill 821 was introduced by the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee to address the funding crisis for the Delta Independent Science Board. The bill has passed out of the Senate and is in the Assembly.  California Water Research raised concerns at the Delta Stewardship Council’s June 24, 2021 meeting that the bill would not take effect until January of 2022. Council member Christy Smith responded: “I’m very hopeful that an urgency clause can be added in Assembly policy committee because I think it’s warranted in the case.” … ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: Assembly adds urgency clause to bill to save Delta Independent Science Board

“Legendary” Bay Delta scientist Jim Cloern resigns from Delta Independent Science Board

Deirdre Des Jardins writes, “USGS scientist emeritus Jim Cloern has resigned from the Delta Independent Science Board (Delta ISB), effective June 19, 2021. Cloern was one of six new scientists appointed to the board in June of 2020 by the Delta Stewardship Council after a nationwide search. … Michael Dettinger, a former USGS climate scientist and visiting researcher at the Scripps Institute for Oceanography, reacted with dismay to the news of Cloern’s resignation on Twitter, tweeting, “Biased I know, but there goes the biggest thinker re bay/delta that you had.” ... ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: “Legendary” Bay Delta scientist Jim Cloern resigns from Delta Independent Science Board

A decade of recharge leads to statewide solutions

As California braces for drought and speculates about its severity, it’s easy to focus on “farms vs. fish” and other contentious headlines swirling in the news.  Sustainable Conservation’s decade-plus of experience guiding groundwater recharge in the field and at the state level means we have a balanced view of our current water realities, and our potential future.  One thing is clear: California needs resilient water management strategies, and agencies, water managers, and people must work together to capture water when we have it to store it for when we need it most. … ”  Read more from Sustainable Conservation here: A decade of recharge leads to statewide solutions

Farm tours give bloggers a look at how our food is grown

CFWC’s Annual Blogger Tours are an opportunity for us to give bloggers an in-depth look at how our food is grown in California for them to share with their followers. Food and lifestyle bloggers are a trusted source of information for hundreds of thousands of their followers. They help spread a positive message about California farmers, the food they grow, and the water needed to do it. Each tour highlights a different region of California’s agriculture. The focus of this year’s event was on winter farming in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys. To comply with social distancing, we took the tour virtual! … ”  Read more from the California Farm Water Coalition here: Farm tours give bloggers a look at how our food is grown

Reverence or Pragmatism? The Upper Colorado River Basin’s Compact Dilemma

Eric Kuhn and John Fleck write, “Unlike the Lower Colorado River Basin States, which have traditionally taken pragmatic and self-serving views of the 1922 Colorado River Compact, the Upper Basin States have largely shown the century-old document unwavering reverence.  The reverence comes from the way the agreement protected Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico against the avaricious impulses of fast-growing Lower Basin states, especially Arizona and California. The Compact promised water that has driven a century of development and dreaming in the Upper Basin.  Now, however, climate change-driven aridification has the Upper Basin in a vise-like squeeze. Increasing regional temperatures are reducing the river’s natural flow while the compact imposes fixed delivery (or non-depletion) obligations on the four Upper Basin States. … ”  Read more from the Inkstain blog here: Reverence or Pragmatism? The Upper Colorado River Basin’s Compact Dilemma

 

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.
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