WEEKLY WATER NEWS DIGEST for April 4-9: Ensuring the reliability of the State Water Project; Update on Fresno River adjudication; plus all the top water stories of the week

A wrap-up of posts published on Maven’s Notebook this week …

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This week’s featured articles …

CA WATER COMMISSION: Ensuring the reliability of the State Water Project, part 1: Strategic priorities and programs

One of the California Water Commission’s statutory responsibilities is to conduct an annual review of the construction and operation of the State Water Project and make a report on its findings to the Department of Water Resources and the Legislature, with any recommendations it may have.  Having just finished the 2020 State Water Project review, the Commission has launched its 2021 State Water Project review with a theme focused on creating a resilient State Water Project by addressing climate change and aging infrastructure to provide multiple benefits for California. The goal of this year’s briefings is to deepen the Commission and the public’s awareness of how the State Water Project serves California and the challenges the State Water Project faces.

At the California Water Commission’s March meeting, Commissioners heard a series of presentations on the State Water Project which will be covered in two parts.  In part one, Karla Nemeth, the Director of the Department of Water Resources, discussed the Department’s overall plans for the State Water Project for the upcoming year.  Next, Ted Craddock, Deputy Director for the State Water Project, then discussed the strategic priorities and initiatives that the Department is doing to ensure the reliability of the State Water Project.

Click here to read this article.


CA WATER COMMISSION: Ensuring the reliability of the State Water Project, part 2: Assessing climate change vulnerabilities and addressing aging infrastructure

At the California Water Commission‘s March meeting, Commissioners heard a series of presentations on the State Water Project.  In the second and last installment, John Andrew, Assistant Deputy Director, gave a presentation on the climate change vulnerability for the State Water Project, and Behzad Soltanzadeh, Assistant Division Chief, discussed the Department’s efforts to address issues related to aging infrastructure.


STATE WATER BOARD: Update on the Fresno River adjudication

With no viable interim solutions that the Board can implement, the process is expected to take years

In October of 2018, the State Water Board received a petition from Madera Irrigation District for a statutory adjudication of the Fresno River watershed.  In 2019, the Board adopted a resolution that postponed the adoption of the petition while the parties in the watershed went through a third-party facilitated effort to come up with a local solution for a pathway forward. Over the next year, stakeholders made some progress but ultimately were unable to resolve the number of contentious issues within the watershed.   So on October 20, 2020, the Board adopted the petition and directed staff to update them on potential interim solutions.

At the April 6 meeting of the State Water Board, staff from the Division of Water Rights updated the Board members on the ongoing issues and possible interim solutions for the Fresno River watershed.

Click here to read this article.

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In California water news this week …

Advances in remote sensing are providing a first glimpse of groundwater recharge in the San Joaquin Valley

Groundwater is a key resource for water users in California’s Central Valley, a major agricultural hub with an economic output of tens of billions of dollars annually. Surface deformation in the Central Valley has long been linked to changes in groundwater storage, but the timing and movement of water flow beneath the surface has been poorly understood due to a lack of reliable data.  Now, for the first time, scientists at the University of California San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography and School of Global Policy and Strategy, as well as the U.S. Geological Survey are using advanced satellite data to map the “pulse” of groundwater flow through the San Joaquin Valley, the southern portion of the Central Valley. … ”  Read more from UC San Diego here: Scientists map “pulse” of groundwater flow through California’s Central Valley

State Water Resources Control Board adopts resolution approving state wetland definition and dredge and fill procedures

On April 6, 2021, the State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) approved the application of the State Wetland Definition and Procedures for Discharges of Dredged or Fill Material to Waters of the State (Procedures) as a water quality control policy, carefully avoiding the scope of a recent court order. This resolution will allow the Board to directly apply the water Procedures to waters of the State as an exercise of its policy-making authority rather than the water quality control planning process. … ”  Read more from Somach Simmons & Dunn here:  State Water Resources Control Board adopts resolution approving state wetland definition and dredge and fill procedures

Markets, water availability prove key in land values

Despite market unknowns created by the pandemic and lower commodity prices, California agricultural land values remained largely stable, an indication buyers have confidence in the long-term land market in the state: This was a key takeaway from a virtual business conference held by the California Chapter of the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers.  The conference also discussed impacts of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act on California land values.  Even though record supplies of the state’s highest-value crops led to lower prices for farmers last year, appraisers said the softer prices also helped move those products.  ... ”  Read more from the California Farm Bureau here: Markets, water availability prove key in land values

South San Joaquin ID, Oakdale ID still waiting for federal approval of plan to help threatened fish & stressed farmers

” … OID and SSJID — which have invested considerable money into improving salmon habitat on the Stanislaus River and as well as conservation measures aimed at reducing growers’ use of water — have proposed pushing the spring pulse flow from an anticipated 1,400 cfs at Vernalis to almost 3,000 cfs. … The SSJID and OID have also worked with the San Luis & Delta-Mendota Water Authority and State Water Contractors that may get only 5 percent of the water they need from the Bureau this year to purchase the [water] by diverting it once it enters the Delta.  In order to do so, SSJID and OID need the blessing of the federal Interior and Commerce departments to make the release as well as allow the transfer to the water once it has helped step up the spring pulse flow.  … ”  Read the full story at the Manteca Bulletin here: SSJID, OID still waiting for federal approval of plan to help threatened fish & stressed farmers

SF Baykeeper sues Biden administration to list local longfin smelt as endangered species

A tiny silver fish few people in the Bay Area have heard of could be a new symbol of the state’s continuing battle over water resources.  San Francisco Baykeeper sued the Biden administration on Thursday to list the local population of longfin smelt as an endangered species. The environmental group’s legal action comes nine years after the federal government first declared that the fish warranted that status.  Once an important source of food for marine mammals, birds and chinook salmon, the local population of the longfin smelt has dropped by 99.9% since the 1980s. … ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here:  SF Baykeeper sues Biden administration to list local longfin smelt as endangered species

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Jeff Kightlinger, Metropolitan Water District

In this episode John Howard and Tim Foster welcomed the longtime but soon-to-be-retired Metropolitan Water District of Southern California head honcho Jeff Kightlinger for a wide-ranging discussion that covered the status of the Delta Tunnel Project, climate change and the snow survey, the drought, working from home, jukeboxes, his punk rock roots and Dan Walters‘ connection to the Zasu Pitts Memorial Orchestra. WHEW.”  Listen at Capitol Weekly here:  Capitol Weekly Podcast: Jeff Kightlinger

Q/A with Delta Conveyance Project Executive Director Tony Meyers

In the first episode in the Delta Conveyance Team Spotlight video series, we spoke with the project’s Executive Director Tony Meyers about his long and eventful career in engineering, including work on some of DWR’s most ambitious and significant infrastructure projects. In this excerpt, he reflects on the appeal of large-scale engineering projects and speaks about the importance of the Delta Conveyance Project in protecting the security of California’s water supply.”  Read the article at DWR News here: Q/A with Delta Conveyance Project Executive Director Tony Meyers

Delta tunnel authority changes leaders as Newsom fights the recall by turning to billionaire champions of the project

The little-known Joint Powers Authority charged with getting the embattled Delta tunnel across its finish line recently changed executive directors, marking an exit for Kathryn Mallon, who had stirred controversy for her exorbitant pay and alleged pressuring of a citizens advisory committee to work through the most dangerous part of the pandemic.  Meanwhile, as California Governor Gavin Newsom begins campaigning against the effort to remove him from office, he’s soliciting huge donations from the same south-state barons of agriculture who have promoted the environmentally fraught tunnel concept for years. ... ”  Read more from the Sacramento News & Review here: Delta tunnel authority changes leaders as Newsom fights the recall by turning to billionaire champions of the project

Snow drought current conditions and impacts in the West

Snow drought conditions that have persisted throughout winter remain locked in place over a large expanse of the Western U.S. during the climatological peak of the snow season. Warm and dry weather over the past week has led to early and accelerated snowmelt throughout the West.  The Upper Colorado River Basin–averaged snow water equivalent indicates peak snowpack a week earlier than normal and early, record or near-record melt from March 29–April 5, which raises major concerns for water supply and fire danger heading into the summer.  A very similar situation is unfolding throughout the Sierra Nevada that will impact California and western Nevada this summer. … ”  Read more from NIDIS here: Snow drought current conditions and impacts in the West

CW3E End of Winter Summary:  Water Year 2021 Characterized by Persistent Dry Weather and Worsening Drought in California

Total precipitation has been well below normal throughout much of California during water year (WY) 2021.  In some regions, drier than normal conditions extend back to the start of WY 2020.  Drought has expanded and intensified across the state, and current water storage levels are below normal in many reservoirs.  Below-normal snowpack in the Sierra Nevada may limit water resource availability as summer approaches.  The abnormally dry conditions were driven by a lack of landfalling atmospheric rivers (ARs) and persistent ridging/blocking over the Northeast Pacific Ocean.  Drought is expected to continue through spring 2021, thereby increasing the threat of significant wildfire activity in summer 2021.” Dive into the details from the Center for Western Water and Weather Extremes here:  CW3E End of Winter Summary:  Water Year 2021 Characterized by Persistent Dry Weather and Worsening Drought in California

Third-driest year reported in California

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) has marked 2021 as the third-driest water year, a period marked from October to March, on record for the Golden State, potentially setting up another deadly wildfire season after last year’s record setting blazes.   The department’s annual snow survey released this month recorded precipitation levels at 50 percent the annual average for the water year.   The dry conditions can also be seen in the state’s water supply, with the department reporting that California’s major reservoirs are at just 50 percent of overall capacity. … ”  Read more from The Hill here: Third-driest year reported in California

Farmers try to plan for a critically dry year

With all signs pointing to a critically dry year in California, farmers are trying to add flexibility to help them make it through the season.  Tulare County farmer and dairy operator Tom Barcellos said he expects to receive “almost nothing” this year when it comes to water supply.  “This year, it doesn’t look like we’re going to get much out of the Tule River; there’s just basically no water coming,” Barcellos said. “We’ve got more acres than we’ve got water, so naturally we’re going to have to fallow some and concentrate on what we can irrigate.” … ”  Read more from Ag Alert here: Farmers try to plan for a critically dry year

Valley lawmakers ask Newsom to declare statewide water emergency

With California in drought conditions amid the third-driest precipitation totals in state history, Valley lawmakers want Gov. Gavin Newsom to take immediate action.  On Wednesday, a bipartisan group asked Newsom to declare a statewide water emergency.   The group cited a 5% water allocation for farmers announced March 23 by the state Department of Water Resources — down from the 10% announced in December — among the reasons for the request. … “As Chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee, I have repeatedly stressed how water and food security is a key component of our national security,” said state Sen. Andreas Borgeas (R-Fresno). “This bipartisan request from Valley legislators demonstrates the dire need for the Governor’s administration to take action and deliver more water to farms and rural communities.” … ”  Read more from GV Wire here:  Valley lawmakers ask Newsom to declare statewide water emergency

Reclamation releases technical reports and interactive web tool supporting the 2021 SECURE Water Act Report

The Bureau of Reclamation today released final technical reports supporting the Water Reliability in the West – 2021 SECURE Water Act Report. Reclamation—s 2021 West-Wide Climate and Hydrology Assessment and seven individual basin reports provide detailed information on climate change impacts and adaptation strategies to increase water supply reliability in the West. A new 2021 SECURE Report Web Portal is also available to provide a user-friendly, web-based format for delivery of information in the reports.  “Western water supply and delivery systems are affected by changing hydrologic conditions and competing demands,” Deputy Commissioner Camille Calimlim Touton said. “These reports highlight Reclamation—s effort to use the best-available science to meet its mission while also collaborating with its water and power customers, states and local agencies, and tribes to address critical western water management issues.” … ”  Read more from the Bureau of Reclamation here:  Reclamation releases technical reports and interactive web tool supporting the 2021 SECURE Water Act Report

California spends $12.8M more on the Salton Sea, finally appoints analyst to study seawater importation

California remains far behind its targets for addressing exposed playa around the Salton Sea, according to data released in the 2021 Salton Sea Management Program annual report. But state officials expressed optimism in a public workshop that they are finally beginning to catch up to those goals.  The state was supposed to implement dust suppression projects or build wetlands habitat across 3,500 acres of exposed playa by the end of 2020 to tamp down dust that’s imbued with a century’s worth of salts, pesticides and other agricultural runoff. Only 755 acres around the mouth of the New River had been completed in that timeframe, although 2020 represented the first year that any state-led dust mitigation projects was finished at the lake. … ”  Read more from the Desert Sun here: California spends $12.8M more on the Salton Sea, finally appoints analyst to study seawater importation

Commentary: Silver lining to water woes could be farmers putting their lands to new uses besides crops

Emmy Cattani, a fifth-generation farmer based in Kern County, and Ann Hayden with the Environmental Defense Fund write, “The Central Valley has reached a critical juncture.  On one path, without proactive, collaborative planning, the Valley could become a haphazard patchwork of dusty fields infested with invasive weeds and pests, further impairing already poor air quality, devastating the agricultural economy and putting many farmworkers out of work.  On another path, the Valley can remain a thriving agricultural region amid a mosaic of new land uses, like vibrant habitat corridors for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox or wildlife-friendly groundwater recharge areas for migratory birds or outdoor recreational green spaces for families.  A bill that on Thursday unanimously passed out of the Assembly Committee on Water, Parks and Wildlife can help move the Valley down this second, more resilient path. … ”  Continue reading at the Fresno Bee here: Commentary: Silver lining to water woes could be farmers putting their lands to new uses besides crops

California is greenlighting oil wells linked to groundwater pollution

Throughout 2020 and early 2021, California issued more than 300 permits to oil and gas companies for new underground injection wells — an intensive form of oil production and wastewater disposal.  But the actual number of new injection wells is likely higher, owing to the state’s opaque approval process that has drawn scrutiny from auditors and environmentalists. Some of these undercounted wells may be polluting groundwater used for public drinking and agricultural purposes, according to regulatory filings reviewed by Capital & Main.  The impact of injection wells on groundwater in California is understudied, regulators say. … ”  Read more from Capitol & Main here: California is greenlighting oil wells linked to groundwater pollution

Sierra Meadows strategy: Source waters hold the key to combatting the effects of climate change

In 2016—after two years of rigorous scientific study by CalTrout and its partners in the Sierra Meadows Partnership—the Sierra Meadows Strategy for restoring and protecting our state’s Sierra Nevada meadows was officially released. A key piece of CalTrout’s source-waters-to-sea approach to combatting the effects of drought and climate change, this strategy developed among a broad coalition of conservation partners aims to restore and conserve meadows throughout the Sierra Nevada, protecting a major source of our state’s water supply and critical habitats to fish and other species. … ”  Read more from Cal Trout here: Sierra Meadows strategy: Source waters hold the key to combatting the effects of climate change

Secretary Ross on how agriculture is contributing to the state’s climate goals

During February, CDFA’s Office of Environmental Farming and Innovation held a series of meetings with farmers and ranchers to get their input on ways to sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve biodiversity to help meet California’s climate goals. CDFA released a preliminary report from those sessions Tuesday (March 30). Secretary Karen Ross spoke with Agri-Pulse about those meetings and how ag is contributing to the state’s climate goals.  “This is about helping to solve the biggest challenge of our time. Nothing’s more rewarding than to be able to grow food and feed people, but to be able to do this and solve these problems and to be able to improve not only nutrition for people, but the health of our planet… who wouldn’t want to be in agriculture?” … ”  Read the interview at CDFA’s Planting Seeds here: Secretary Ross on how agriculture is contributing to the state’s climate goals

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In regional water news this week …

Haaland dives headfirst into Klamath water issues

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland withdrew a number of Trump-era memoranda concerning the Klamath Project on Thursday, citing a lack of consultation with Klamath Basin tribes, and committed her staff to work with stakeholders on a long-term solution to the Basin’s water crisis. “These documents were issued without government-to-government consultation with affected Tribes and do not reflect the current administration’s goals for long-term water recovery and economic restoration in this region,” Haaland said. “The documents also conflict with longstanding departmental positions and interpretation of governing law and should not be relied upon for any purpose.” … ”  Read more from Herald & News here: Haaland dives headfirst into Klamath water issues

Irrigators take aim at Klamath River flushing flows in court

As the Klamath Basin approaches one of its driest summers on record, Upper Klamath Lake is already being subjected to a three-way tug-of-war in court. While the Klamath Tribes want water to remain in the lake, irrigators want it diverted to the Klamath Project — and neither party wants to see more water sent down the Klamath River. Earlier this week, Klamath Irrigation District filed an emergency motion against the Bureau of Reclamation in Klamath County Circuit Court, requesting a judge bar the agency from releasing water from Upper Klamath Lake for flushing flows in the Klamath River this spring. … ”  Read more from the Herald & News here: Irrigators take aim at Klamath River flushing flows in court

Reopening a Northern California creek to threatened steelhead—part 2: using natural sediment to benefit fish

Most dam removal projects view sediment as a problem. Biologists often worry that releasing the stored sediment will harm fish and wildlife or disperse in unpredictable ways to change the course of streams. Others see releasing stored sediment as a catalyst for flooding. In some cases, though, sediment can be a solution.  Biologists working to remove the dam on York Creek knew that sediment spreading naturally through the York Creek and Napa River watersheds could benefit the ecoystem. It could replenish gravel and restore spawning beds, rearing habitat, and resting habitat for steelhead listed under the Endangered Species Act. ... ”  Read more from NOAA here:  Reopening a Northern California creek to threatened steelhead—part 2: using natural sediment to benefit fish

Why is it taking so long to restore the sediment-choked Elk River?

The Elk River is the largest tributary to Humboldt Bay and provides habitat for three runs of salmon and steelhead. But after this timber-rich watershed was heavily logged more than 20 years ago, major storms washed soils from clear-cuts into the river, causing ecological devastation, local flooding, and contamination of local drinking water supplies. We talked to Darren Mierau of CalTrout about the Elk River Recovery Program and the big challenges facing this effort.  PPIC: What happened to this watershed, and what is the project seeking to restore?  A: The Elk River became a focus of conflict after a local logging company was acquired in a hostile takeover by an out-of-state company.  … ”  Read more from the PPIC here:  Why is it taking so long to restore the sediment-choked Elk River?

Sacramento: Water saved for ‘not so rainy days’ to be used this year

A water system that may actually help usher the greater Sacramento region through this dry water year — rather painlessly — is often overlooked.  Water providers said most people think of Folsom Lake or the American River, the sources of water that can be visibly seen. Those bodies of water, however, only make up half of our water picture.  Groundwater also plays a vital role, and in a dry year like this one, we’ll need to rely on it to a greater degree, according to water providers. … ”  Read more from KCRA Channel 3 here: Sacramento: Water saved for ‘not so rainy days’ to be used this year

Monterey: One agency’s effort to revive a dormant water battle shows the consequences of elections

Monterey One Water’s effort to expand its Pure Water Monterey project and provide more clean water to the Peninsula through filtering and recycling sewage took a significant step forward on March 29. The agency’s board of directors said yes to updating a required study on the project’s environmental impact.  Completion and the board’s certification of the study are prerequisites for a Pure Water Monterey expansion, which has been controversial in recent years. The board’s support signals shifting political tides around the issue. … ”  Read more from Monterey Weekly here: Monterey: One agency’s effort to revive a dormant water battle shows the consequences of elections

Monterey urges state to allow relief from Carmel River pumping order

Elected officials in Monterey approved a letter Tuesday in support of a petition that the state provide relief from a specific portion of a cease-and-desist order governing the amount of water that can be pumped out of the Carmel River basin. If granted, the relief would allow for hundreds of new housing units to be built in the city and along the Monterey Peninsula.  The issue is important because additional housing, particularly affordable housing, is important to workers and businesses such as the hospitality industry because many of these low-income employees can no longer afford to live in the city. That in itself causes environmental damage from additional climate-altering greenhouse gases generated by longer commutes workers are forced to make. ... ”  Read more from the Monterey Herald here: Monterey urges state to allow relief from Carmel River pumping order

Oakdale: Salmon restoration effort gets go ahead

Oakdale City Council members unanimously approved moving forward with Phase II of the Stanislaus River Salmonid Habitat Restoration Project at Monday night’s council meeting, April 5, which will put an additional $361,400 of grant funding into play for the extensive project.  According to city documents, in 2018-2019, the City of Oakdale was awarded a grant through the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) in the amount of $341,036 to financially support and assist the implementation of the Stanislaus River Salmonid Habitat Restoration Project (River Restoration Project) at the Stanley Wakefield Wilderness Area. These grant funds were to be utilized to fund the efforts to provide baseline data and analysis for 100 percent design plans that would ultimately lead to the enhancement and restoration of up to 28 acres of channel, floodplain and upland habitats. … ”  Read more from the Oakdale Leader here: Salmon restoration effort gets go ahead

San Luis Obispo County sticks with plan for new Paso Robles water basin rules

San Luis Obispo County supervisors are proceeding with a new regulatory framework for pumping water in the Paso Robles Groundwater Basin that organized agriculture opposes.  The Board of Supervisors voted 3-2 on April 6 to move ahead on an environmental impact report for a proposed ordinance that would replace the existing ordinance, which essentially prohibits increased pumping from the struggling North County aquifer.  The new ordinance would allow a higher level of groundwater use for hopeful small farmers—allowing up to 25 acre-feet per year of unchecked pumping per property, instead of the 5 acre-feet per year currently allowed. ... ”  Read more from New Times SLO here: San Luis Obispo County sticks with plan for new Paso Robles water basin rules 

San Luis Obispo County supervisors open the door to water banking

A barely-noticed action early in March by the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors likely has placed greater control of the region’s water supply in the hands of a few individuals and private water agencies.  On a split 3-2, north-south vote, supervisors on March 3 approved an amendment to the county’s contract with the state of California for deliveries from the State Water Project (SWP). An approval that creates the opportunity, some say, for a controversial practice called “water banking.”  “I’m very worried about this amendment,” said Supervisor Debbie Arnold, who voted against the proposal along with fellow North County Supervisor John Peshong. … ”  Read more from Cal Coast News here: San Luis Obispo County supervisors open the door to water banking

San Diego: Water agencies in rural Fallbrook and Rainbow move forward with plans to leave County Authority

The water agencies in Fallbrook and Rainbow announced Thursday they will move forward with an effort to leave the San Diego County Water Authority and join the Eastern Municipal Water District in southwest Riverside County.  The two agencies say current water rates are decimating agriculture in the rural North County area and there is limited connection with the main water supply network in the rest of San Diego County.  As a result, the agencies say, Fallboook and Rainbow residents don’t benefit from expensive projects like the Carlsbad desalination plant and San Vicente dam raising that free San Diego from full reliance on the Colorado River. … ”  Read more from the Times of San Diego here: San Diego: Water agencies in rural Fallbrook and Rainbow move forward with plans to leave County Authority 

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Weekly features …

BLOG ROUND-UP: Drastic measure to meet Delta outflow; Questions surround creation of employee positions for DISB members; San Joaquin Valley at a crossroads; The dam problem for the Bay-Delta Estuary; and more …

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SCIENCE NEWS: Reopening a NorCal creek to steelhead; It’s tern up time in CA; How 100-year old salmon scales help better manage salmon populations; and more …

Click here to read this article.

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Announcements, notices, and funding opportunities …

CA WATER COMMISSION: Q&A session for applicants submitting screening information for water storage projects

PUBLIC MEETING: Development of Potential Amendments to the Water Quality Control Plans for Tribal Beneficial Use Designations

HYDROVISIONS: Considerations for developing an Aquifer Storage and Recovery program; Managing PFAS; Well development programs & their importance; and more …

FAMILY FARM ALLIANCE: April Monthly Briefing | Infrastructure Hearings & Proposals | Biden Cabinet Update | And more…

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: CalEPA Now Accepting Applications for Environmental Justice Grants (2021 Cycle)

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: NRCS Invites Proposals for 2021 Conservation Innovation Grants

RULING: State Water Board’s AHO issues ruling on motions to quash in Kings River case

WATER PLAN eNEWS: ~~Drought Planning~ Land Repurposing~ Development Act~ Volunteer Hub~ Community Benefits~ Data 101~ Data Science~~

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ Instagram Live~ DISB Meeting~ Marketing Workshop~ Regional Trails~ Art Contest ~~

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