WEEKLY WATER NEWS DIGEST for Feb. 28 – March 5: Regional conveyance workshop overview, Update on voluntary agreements, plus all the top water stories of the week; and more …

A wrap-up of posts published on Maven’s Notebook this week …

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This week’s featured articles …

CA WATER COMMISSION: Regional conveyance workshop overview; Financing mechanisms

A drone provides a view of the Tehachapi Control Structure and the Tehachapi Afterbay, part of the California State Water Project. Photo by Ken James / DWR

In recent months, the California Water Commission has been gathering public and expert input related to conveyance projects as part of their work in assessing the state’s role in financing water conveyance projects that can help meet needs in a changing climate, a task assigned to the Commission in action 19.4 in the Water Resilience Portfolio.

At the February Commission meeting, Commissioners received a briefing on the recent regional public conveyance workshops and heard from an expert panel on funding mechanisms and challenges.

Click here to read this article.


MET BAY-DELTA COMMITTEE: Update on the voluntary agreements, Delta Conveyance Project

Click here to read this article.


DELTA LEAD SCIENTIST REPORT: Farm to Fish: Lessons from a Multi-Year Study on Agricultural Floodplain Habitat, plus an update on activities of the Delta Science Program

At the February meeting of the Delta Stewardship Council, Delta Lead Scientist Laurel Larsen discussed a new report on the benefits of floodplain habitats for fish production and updated the Council on the Delta Science Program’s activities.

Click here to read this article.


MONTHLY RESERVOIR REPORT for March 1

Prepared Exclusively for Maven’s Notebook by Robert Shibatani

The much-anticipated storms of February have come and gone.  Despite early optimism, the storms were modest at best, providing only temporary hydrologic relief.  Precipitation and accumulated reservoir inflows-to-date as well as current reservoir storage remain below average.

Click here to read this article.

 

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In California water news this week …

California likely faces a critically dry year, with reservoirs and Sierra snowpack already well below average

California will likely face a critically dry year with much less runoff from the Sierra Nevada snowpack than normal and reservoirs that already are showing the impact of winter precipitation that is well below average, state water authorities said Tuesday.  The state Department of Water Resources’ latest survey from a network of electronic stations found that the water content of the overall snowpack was 61% of the historical March 2 average and 54% of the average on April 1, when it is historically at its maximum. … ”  Read more from KTLA here: California likely faces a critically dry year, with reservoirs and Sierra snowpack already well below average

Barring ‘miracle,’ farm water will be in short supply

“”We need a Miracle March,” Kern County almond grower Don Davis says, expressing the concern of many farmers as California drops deeper into drought.  The U.S. Drought Monitor said last week 85% of the state is experiencing moderate to exceptional drought and, on the same day, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced low initial allocations for customers of its Central Valley Project.  The bureau said it had allocated 5% supplies to its agricultural service contractors both north and south of the delta.  Davis buys water through a Class 1 contract with the CVP Friant Division and would receive a 20% supply.  “That allocation means they will give me about 20% of my normal usage, so the other 80% is going to have to come from wells,” he said. ... ”  Read more from Ag Alert here: Barring ‘miracle,’ farm water will be in short supply

Historic drought deepens in the West as window for rain, snow closes

The year 2020 is going to be remembered for a lot of things, many of them not so good. Included in the not-so-good list is the drought that has plagued the West, lasting into 2021. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, which has published weekly maps since 2000, the 2020 drought is the worst, in terms of its geographical scope, in more than 20 years. Almost 80 percent of the Western U.S. is in drought, with nearly 42 percent of the region in “extreme” or “exceptional” drought. Much of the region experienced developing drought in the summer, following a warm and dry spring. Since then, conditions have deteriorated, and the precipitation deficits continue to build. … ”  Read more from the Washington Post here: Historic drought deepens in the West as window for rain, snow closes

17 key environmental bills on the 2021 agenda in California’s Legislature

California’s legislative session came to a wild ending in 2020 when the clock ran out on major bills. Key pieces of environmental legislation were among those that died on the floor, and conservationists are hoping 2021 brings a different story. … “This year, I think we’re setting our sights a little higher than 2020 when the standard was essentially survival,” said Brian Nowicki, California climate policy director for the Center for Biological Diversity. “But, because of the continued logistical complications in the Legislature due to COVID, it’s still going to be difficult to hold hearings.” … ”  Read more from the Desert Sun here:  17 key environmental bills on the 2021 agenda in California’s Legislature

Bills seek to conserve public lands and rivers across California

Based on anecdotal reports from around the U.S., more people have been getting outside to hunt, fish, hike, cycle, boat, and more during the COVID-19 pandemic than in recent memory. But despite this trend, one long-standing and unfortunate aspect of outdoor recreation remains: Not all people have equitable access to trails, parks, rivers, and other public lands and waters. That may change in California because of four bills that would help safeguard mountains, forests, and rivers in the state and improve opportunities for people to experience these resources. … ”  Read more from the Pew Trust here:  Bills seek to conserve public lands and rivers across California

Congress passes Garamendi bill to expand Delta National Heritage Area into Rio Vista

Approximately 62 acres of land in Rio Vista, including the former Army Reserve Center, have been incorporated into legislation by Rep. John Garamendi, D-Solano, to increase the boundaries of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta National Heritage Area. This bill, known as House Resolution 1230, passed in the U.S. House of Representatives Friday and will move on to the Senate.  The bill is an expansion of bicameral legislation by Garamendi and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., that was signed into law in 2019 to provide $10 million for community-based efforts to preserve the Delta’s cultural heritage as well as its historical landmarks. The law was incorporated into the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act and signed into law by then-President Donald Trump. … ”  Read more from the Daily Republic here: Congress passes Garamendi bill to expand National Heritage Area into Rio Vista

CSPA & PCFFA urge reversal of harmful & unlawful Trump actions on the Central Valley Project

The California Sportfishing Protection Alliance (CSPA) and the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA) sent a joint letter on February 16, 2021 to the Biden Administration and Secretary of Interior designate Debra Haaland, urging them to withdraw or rescind four major policy changes to the Central Valley Project (CVP). These changes were last-minute actions of the Trump Administration made by former Interior Secretary Bernhardt, who was previously employed by one of the biggest beneficiaries of these actions: Westlands Water District. If implemented, the actions would lead to extremely adverse environmental, cultural, and economic impacts within California. … ”  Read more from CSPA here: CSPA & PCFFA urge reversal of harmful & unlawful Trump actions on the Central Valley Project

Court ruling upholds $2.8 million penalty, protects sensitive marsh land in Suisun Bay

In a ruling that could strengthen vital wetlands protections throughout California, the First District Court of Appeal has upheld a cleanup and abatement order and a $2.8 million fine issued by the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board (San Francisco Bay Water Board) for unauthorized levee construction and other activities in the Suisun Marsh. Located in Solano County, Suisun Marsh is the largest contiguous, brackish marsh on the west coast of North America and a critical part of the Bay-Delta estuary. The case centers around activity dating to 2014 and 2015, when John Sweeney and Point Buckler Club constructed nearly a mile of levee around Point Buckler Island without obtaining permits or approvals from the San Francisco Bay Water Board and other agencies. The levee blocked off all tidal channels, killing the tidal marshland vegetation and preventing salmon and other sensitive fish species from entering the channels to forage for food. … ”  Read more from the State Water Board here:  Court ruling upholds $2.8 million penalty, protects sensitive marsh land in Suisun Bay

East Orosi: ‘It’s a toxic blend’: where the kids are warned not to swallow the bath water

An invisible line splits the rural road of Avenue 416 in California’s Tulare county, at the point where the nut trees stretch east toward the towering Sierra Nevada mountains in the distance.  On one side of the line, residents have clean water. On the other side, they do not.  On the other side lies East Orosi, an unincorporated community of about 700 where children grow up learning to never open their eyes or mouths while they shower. They know that what comes out of their faucets may harm them, and parents warn they must not swallow when they brush their teeth.  They spend their lives sustaining themselves on bottled water while just one mile down Avenue 416, the same children they go to school with in the community of Orosi can drink from their taps freely and bathe without a second thought. … ”  Read more from The Guardian here: East Orosi: ‘It’s a toxic blend’: where the kids are warned not to swallow the bath water

SoCal grandmother owes $17,000 in water bills

A tsunami of love is what anyone walking into 67-year-old Deborah Bell-Holt’s Jefferson Park home can expect.  “This is a place where you can come and just talk, if you’re hungry you can come and be fed,” said Holt.  That’s why when the pandemic hit, she welcomed back with open arms eight of her children and grandchildren. All of a sudden, her household grew from four to 12. … But those extra family members added another wrinkle to Holt’s already complicated situation with water affordability. At the beginning of the pandemic Holt owed $8,000 to LADWP, now her debt is over $17,000. ... ”  Read more from Spectrum 1 here: SoCal grandmother owes $17,000 in water bills

California water on the market: Q&A with Barton “Buzz” Thompson

California water has joined gold, energy and bitcoin as a commodity whose future value can be traded on a financial exchange and the first market trades on water futures took place three months ago. The market, based on values determined by NASDAQ’s Veles Water Market Index, was hailed by some as a useful tool so California farmers can reduce the risk of drought-driven escalation in water costs. It was sharply criticized by others, from a United Nations representative to racial justice groups as potentially limiting access to something essential to life.  Buzz Thompson, a Stanford Law School professor and founding director of the Woods Institute for the Environment, now directs the Water in the West program. He founded the law school’s Environment and Natural Resources program and served as a special master for the United States Supreme Court in Montana v. Wyoming, an interstate water dispute involving the Yellowstone River.  Here are his answers to questions about the development of thinking about water’s value and the possible impacts of this market in water futures. … ”  Read more from the & the West blog here:  California water on the market: Q&A with Barton “Buzz” Thompson

Water Data 101

As nations, states, and cities plan for the future, water will need to be thoughtfully allocated, conservatively used, carefully managed, intentionally reused, and thoroughly monitored and understood to ensure the water needs of current and future generations are met and prepared for. To do so, we need to enable leaders and water managers to make educated decisions regarding water resources. To enable sustainable, efficient, water management, we need to answer three key questions: How much water is available?; how is it being used?; and what is its quality?   Water data is essential for answering these questions. But first, what is water data? What does it look like? Where does it come from? Well, as all good questions should be answered, that depends. … ”  Read more from the Internet of Water here: Water data 101

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In regional water news this week …

Irrigators hope to benefit from Klamath re-quantification ruling

Water rights held by the Klamath Tribes must be re-quantified under a recent court decision that’s offered hope to irrigators facing water shut-offs in the region. The ruling has largely upheld a determination by the Oregon Water Resources Department that the Klamath Tribes have “time immemorial” in-stream water rights that haven’t been diminished or abandoned.  However, Klamath County Circuit Judge Cameron Wogan has agreed with Upper Klamath Basin irrigators that OWRD must re-quantify the Klamath Tribes’ water rights because the agency didn’t consider their “moderate living standard.” … ”  Read more from the Capital Press here: Klamath Irrigators hope to benefit from Klamath re-quantification ruling

Skeptical about Klamath River dam removal, Harbor District, Del Norte County seek protection against potential damages

Though the nonprofit tasked with Klamath River dam removal is about to submit its definite plan to federal regulators, Del Norte County and the Crescent City Harbor District are still worried about potential negative impacts.  Harbor commissioners on Thursday agreed to sign onto a memorandum of understanding that includes the county and the Klamath River Renewal Corporation. The MOU contains conditions that ensures the harbor and county can recover potential damages to the port and the fishing industry that occur as a result of dam removal and reservoir drawdown on the Klamath River. … ”  Read more from the Lost Coast Outpost here:  Skeptical about Klamath River dam removal, Harbor District, Del Norte County seek protection against potential damages

Here’s the latest on how Redding’s Sundial Bridge affects endangered salmon

For many years, lights at the Sundial Bridge in Redding were blamed for possibly causing the deaths of young endangered salmon in the Sacramento River. But a new study conducted by a team of scientists may get the bridge off the hook.  California fish and wildlife officials had thought the lights attracted large groups of juvenile salmon that became prey to bigger fish when the little ones congregated under the Sundial Bridge lights. … But in a study conducted last year, scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of California, Santa Cruz Institute of Marine Sciences found no evidence the bridge lights were causing larger fish to eat young winter-run chinook salmon. … ”  Read more from the Redding Record-Searchlight here: Here’s the latest on how Redding’s Sundial Bridge affects endangered salmon

California spring flood outlook 2021: Low, but always high in Sacramento

Sacramento is typically ranked first or second in the country for the risk of flooding. The region is surrounded by the Sacramento, American and Cosumnes Rivers. The American and Sacramento Rivers have flood control measures like weirs, bypasses and Folsom Dam. The Cosumnes River is an uncontrolled and natural river running from the Sierra Nevada foothills and flowing into southern Sacramento County.   Much of the flood control system is over a century old. … ”  Read more from Channel 10 here:  California spring flood outlook 2021: Low, but always high in Sacramento

A potential flood threat is hidden in the East Bay Hills — Chabot Dam

If the Lake Chabot Dam cracked open in a big earthquake, what kind of flooding should the communities below expect? A tsunami that knocks down houses? Sidewalk streams?”  Hollyann Vickers Keng posed that question to Bay Curious as she and her husband were checking out the possibility of buying a home in San Leandro. The house hunt in the East Bay town, just south of Oakland and stretching from the East Bay Hills to the shore of San Francisco Bay, included something unexpected.  “You know, we were expecting to see on the disclosure things about earthquakes,” Vickers Keng says. “But I was not expecting to see anything about a flood zone. It was totally surprising to me.” ... ”  Read more from KQED here: A potential flood threat is hidden in the East Bay Hills — Chabot Dam

‘Dirt broker’s’ sentence for dumping construction debris near Bay in Newark overturned

A federal appeals court overturned a self-described “dirt broker’s” convictions and 2½-year prison sentence Thursday for dumping truckloads of construction debris on land in Newark near San Francisco Bay, saying jurors should have been asked to decide whether he knew he was on wetlands or that the debris would reach the water.  James Philip Lucero of Carmel was convicted by an Oakland federal jury in 2018 of three charges of violating the Clean Water Act by discharging pollutants into U.S. waters. Prosecutors said Lucero was paid by trucking companies and contractors to make land available for depositing about 1,800 truckloads of dirt and debris on lands near Mowry Slough, without a federal permit or permission from the private landowner. ... ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here:  ‘Dirt broker’s’ sentence for dumping construction debris near Bay in Newark overturned

San Francisco Bay: EPA deals setback to Cargill over Redwood City property

The Biden administration has sided with environmentalists in their long-running battle with Cargill Salt over whether an expansive property on the shoreline of San Francisco Bay in Redwood City can be developed.  In the latest chapter of a saga that has played out for 12 years with potentially billions of dollars at stake, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday dropped the Trump administration’s appeal of a federal court ruling from last October that concluded the property, located east of Highway 101 near the Port of Redwood City, is subject to the federal Clean Water Act. … ”  Read more from the East Bay Times here: San Francisco Bay: EPA deals setback to Cargill over Redwood City property

After the Creek Fire: Why a big rain could be bad for Fresno-area drinking water

That it hasn’t rained much this year isn’t all bad news, especially in the aftermath of the Creek Fire that burned nearly 40% of the San Joaquin River watershed. Most importantly, mountain communities devastated by the Creek Fire have not faced the secondary disaster that can be brought by weather, like in Santa Barbara County when heavy rain in the burn scar of the Thomas Fire led to deadly and destructive mudslides. Some areas near Big Creek and North Fork are at risk of hazardous, post-fire debris flows. There is another benefit of the dry year. A big rainstorm could make tap water undrinkable for thousands of people in Fresno County, where public water systems aren’t equipped to filter large amounts of sediment that could come from debris flows. … ”  Read more from the Fresno Bee here: After the Creek Fire: Why a big rain could be bad for Fresno-area drinking water

Paso Robles: Supervisors discuss water resources and amendments

” …  After closed session, the Board returned to hear the Water Management Amendment 18 to Water Supply Contract between the State of California Department of Water Resources and San Luis Obispo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District.  This amendment would give more flexibility to the county in how they want to use any additional water over the allowed holding while still requiring that every use would have to come before the Board to be approved.  Peschong stated his concerns on behalf of his constituents, “We really have gone out of our way not to allow water banking. If I can cut to one thing, this is what I worry about. [The verbiage of the amendment is] not strong enough to let the state know this is not the place they can store water underground.” ... ”  Read more from the Paso Robles Press here: Paso Robles: Supervisors discuss water resources and amendments

Water security vs. water marketing: Should state water supplies be sold outside the county?

Bradbury Dam, Lake Cachuma. Photo by Damian Gadal

It’s not long ago that Lake Cachuma, the main water source on the South Coast, was in danger of going dry in a seven-year drought.  Water agencies from Carpinteria to Goleta spent millions of dollars scrambling to buy surplus state aqueduct water from around the state to avert a local shortage. They did so not only because their groundwater levels were plunging and Cachuma was failing, but because their yearly allocations from the aqueduct had dropped to zero.  Yet on Tuesday, the water managers serving Santa Maria, Buellton, Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Montecito and the Santa Ynez and Carpinteria valleys will ask the County Board of Supervisors to grant them the right to sell their state water allocations outside the county — not permanently, but potentially for years at a stretch. … ” Read more from the Santa Barbara Independent here: Water security vs. water marketing: Should state water supplies be sold outside the county?

Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors extends State Water Project Contract through 2085

The Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 on Tuesday to approve an extension of the county’s state water contract for 50 years, saying it would ultimately save ratepayers money.  “The ability to stretch costs over time is a real benefit,” said Supervisor Gregg Hart, who represents the Goleta Valley and western Santa Barbara.  Eight water agencies in Santa Barbara County, from the Carpinteria Valley to the City of Santa Maria, presently import water through the California Aqueduct. By 2035, their ratepayers will have paid off the $575 million construction debt for the pipeline that county voters approved in 1991 on the heels of a six-year drought. It extends from the aqueduct in Kern County to Lake Cachuma. … ”  Read more from the Santa Barbara Independent here:  Santa Barbara County extends State Water Project Contract through 2085

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Along the Colorado River …

In rapidly warming Colorado River Basin, the negotiating table is being set

“Anyone who has hosted a good dinner party knows that the guest list, table setting and topic of conversation play a big role in determining whether the night is a hit or the guests leave angry and unsatisfied.  That concept is about to get a true test on the Colorado River, where chairs are being pulled up to a negotiating table to start a new round of talks that could define how the river system adapts to a changing climate for the next generation. … ”  Read more from Arizona Public Media here: In rapidly warming Colorado River Basin, the negotiating table is being set

The biggest coal power plant in the American West closed. What happens with the Colorado River water it used?

An emblem of coal power in the United States — and a symbol of coal’s tight bond with water — is being dismantled, piece by piece.  Navajo Generating Station was the largest coal-fired power plant in the American West, a testament to the political bargaining generations ago that divvied up the region’s land, minerals, and water. But the facility’s time is now up. …  In the end, Navajo Generating Station will be little more than a memory. But it also leaves behind an unsettled legacy. Besides a few scattered buildings, a transmission line, and a rail line, what will remain after the facility is decommissioned is a water rights dispute. … ”  Read more from the Circle of Blue here: The biggest coal power plant in the American West closed. What happens with the Colorado River water it used? 

In national water news this week …

HotSpots H2O: Florida-Georgia water dispute returns to Supreme Court

The long-running dispute between Florida and Georgia over water resources reached the U.S. Supreme Court last week. The court will decide whether Georgia must cap its water use from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint basin and allow more water to flow downstream to Florida.  The dispute began in the 1990s and has been entangled ever since by contentious negotiations and numerous court dates. The ACF basin, which empties into the Gulf of Mexico, is a hard-working watershed. … ”  Read more from Circle of Blue here: HotSpots H2O: Florida-Georgia Water Dispute Returns to Supreme Court

Are clean rivers too expensive? Ninth circuit will decide

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency let Montana excuse itself from requirements to protect world-class trout streams from pollution that creates toxic algal blooms. The reason? It would simply cost too much to protect rivers to the degree the law requires, attorneys told judges for the Ninth Circuit on Thursday. ... ”  Read more from the Courthouse News Service here: Are clean rivers too expensive? Ninth circuit will decide

10th Circuit rules against Colorado in ‘Waters of the US’ dispute

The federal government should not be blocked from implementing in Colorado a Trump-era regulation defining what waters are protected by the Clean Water Act, a 10th Circuit panel ruled Tuesday.  In April 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers defined what constitutes “waters of the United States” in a regulation called the Navigable Waters Protection Rule. The definition clarifies which waters are protected by the Clean Water Act and require permits for the discharge of pollution. … ”  Read more from the Courthouse News Service here: 10th Circuit rules against Colorado in ‘Waters of the US’ dispute

Video:  The story of water in Texas

WATER, TEXAS reports about the state’s vulnerability to a changing climate and the government’s uncertain capacity to adjust.  A deep freeze confirmed that finding in early 2021.  The freeze caused power failures and severe water shortages across all of Texas. The story of water in Texas is the state’s devout allegiance to the principle that mankind has dominion over nature. Climate disruption, along with booming population and economic growth, is writing a much different story of vulnerability — to nature’s bullying and to the government’s uncertain capacity to adjust. … ”  Read more from the Circle of Blue here: Video:  The story of water in Texas

Plumbers from around the U.S. volunteer to aid a struggling Texas

Plumbers have begun to descend on Texas volunteering to help the state as it struggles to recover from a debilitating winter storm that left huge swaths with serious and long-term plumbing damage.  Texas became the center of an electricity and plumbing crisis when a record-shattering winter storm crossed the Southern and Central U.S in February. The state’s primary electric grid was unable to keep up with the huge demand as Texans tried to heat their homes. To make matters worse, nonwinterized homes and utilities cracked under the freezing temperatures. Burst pipes and service disruptions due to the cold affected 14.4 million Texans at one point. … ”  Continue reading at NBC News here: Plumbers from around the U.S. volunteer to aid a struggling Texas

New report: U.S. dams, levees get D grades, need $115 billion in upgrades

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) gave America’s infrastructure a C- grade in its quadrennial assessment issued March 3. ASCE gave the nation’s flood control infrastructure – dams and levees – a D grade. This is a highly concerning assessment, given that climate change is increasingly stressing dams and levees as increased evaporation from the oceans drives heavier precipitation events.  The group’s 2021 report card gave the nation’s 91,000-plus dams a D grade, just as they had received in each of its assessments since the first one was issued in 1998. … ”  Read more from Yale Climate Connections here: New report: U.S. dams, levees get D grades, need $115 billion in upgrades

Humans have completely transformed how water is stored on earth

Human fingerprints are all over the world’s freshwater. A new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature shows that while human-controlled freshwater sources make up a minimal portion of the world’s ponds, lakes, and rivers, they are responsible more than half of all changes to the Earth’s water system. The study used new satellite laser technology to take a closer look at freshwater sources across the world and monitor their water levels through different seasons.  Using NASA’s ICESat-2 satellite, researchers monitored more than 227,000 bodies of freshwater–ranging in size from the Great Lakes to tiny ponds over period spanning roughly a year and a half. Researchers found that 57% of global seasonal water storage variability occurs in human-controlled reservoirs. … ”  Read more from Earther here: Humans have completely transformed how water is stored on earth

The real reason why Bill Gates is now the US’ biggest farmland owner

Late last year, Eric O’Keefe was researching a mysterious recent purchase of 14,500 acres of prime Washington state farmland. His magazine, The Land Report, tracks major land transactions and produces an annual list of the 100 biggest US landowners.  Sales of more than a thousand acres are “blue-moon events,” O’Keefe noted, so this one stood out. And Eastern Washington has some of the richest, most expensive farmland in the country. But the purchaser of record was a small, obscure company in Louisiana.  “That immediately set off alarm bells,” O’Keefe says. ... ”  Read more from the New York Post here: The real reason why Bill Gates is now the US’ biggest farmland owner

Weekly features …

BLOG ROUND-UP: CVP and SWP plan to drain CA’s largest reservoirs; Zombie Tunnel Project back to life; CA’s new futures market for water; and more …

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Announcements, notices, and funding opportunities …

NOTICE: Combined Well Standards Reposted to DWR Website

CDFW GRANTS: 2021 Fisheries Restoration Grant Program (FRGP) Public Solicitation Notice Open

OPPORTUNITY TO COMMENT: Draft Cycle 5 Proposition 1 Grant Guidelines

PUBLIC WORKSHOP: Overview of the peer review of the proposed water loss standards

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ New Grants~ Bridge Closures~ Delta Adapts~ CWC Meeting~ DPC Meeting ~~

WATER PLAN eNEWS: ~~Fix a Leak~ General Plans~ Adaptation Strategy~ Forest Resiliency~ Forest Funding~ Data Initiative~ Data Seminars~~

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