DAILY DIGEST, 2/26: Delta smelt on the brink while hatchery smelt thrive; Poor salmon forecasts make fishing restrictions likely; West Coast sea level rising faster than global average; Congress on track to approve millions more in water debt relief; and more ..


On the calendar today …

  • MEETING: The Central Valley Flood Protection Board meets beginning at 9am. Agenda items include the 2022 Central Valley Flood Protection Plan update and tribal engagement and an informational item on Army Corps projects within the Central Valley.  Click here for the full agenda and remote access instructions.
  • PUBLIC WEBINAR: SAFER: Cost Assessment Model Preliminary Results and Gap Analysis from 9am to 11am.  This workshop will provide an opportunity for stakeholders to learn about and contribute to the State Water Board’s development of the Cost Assessment model and Gap Analysis.  Click here to registerClick here for the meeting notice.
  • PUBLIC WORKSHOP: CDFW Grants: Cutting the Green Tape beginning at 9am.  The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) invites the restoration community to participate in two upcoming workshops focused on restoration granting and permitting under its current Cutting the Green Tape initiative. This first meeting will provide an overview of CDFW’s planned Summer 2021 Grant Solicitation which will focus on four watersheds within CDFW’s North Coast Salmon Project and will pilot efficiencies developed under Cutting the Green Tape.  Click here for agenda and meeting details.
  • FREE WEBINAR: Feeding the Future and California’s Role from 10am to 11am. As the world’s population continues to grow, so does the demand for food. In the face of a changing climate, we need to find ways to feed our growing population while also managing natural resources more sustainably and reducing agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions. Sustainable Conservation CEO, Ashley Boren, will set the stage for our Feeding the Future – Sustainable Food for People and Planet webinar series by discussing our global food system and the unique role California plays as well as the key factors of a sustainable and climate-friendly food system.  Click here to register.
  • FREE WEBINAR: February’s Deep Freeze: Cascading Disasters in an Era of Climate Disruption from 1pm to 2pm. Last week’s major winter storm across Texas and the Gulf States had and continues to have devastating human and economic impacts.This webinar will be a broad-ranging conversation that addresses the causes and consequences of the cascade of failures; the relevance for infrastructure and disaster risk reduction in the future; implications for the future of renewable electricity; and lessons about interactions with inequality and racism. This webinar is hosted by Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.  Click here to register.
  • PUBLIC MEETING: CDFW Ventura River Webinar from 1pm to 2pm.  No agenda given.  Click here for Microsoft Teams Meeting.

In California water news today …

A tiny fish is on the brink of extinction. Does it matter that another just like it is thriving?

California’s tiny delta smelt is not a terribly impressive fish at first glance, and not really at second glance either. It’s about the length and width of a finger, silvery and kind of see-through – looks a bit like a sardine.  They’re not particularly clever or cute, but Mandi Finger, a University of California Davis population geneticist, says the delta smelt do have one weird characteristic going for them.  “They smell amazing,” she said. “They smell like the best version of cucumbers you could ever imagine.”  No one knows why, not for certain.  “I know they smell great though. They really do,” Finger said. “I’ve gotten to smell a delta smelt, you know, before they were all gone.” … ”  Read more from WHYY here: A tiny fish is on the brink of extinction. Does it matter that another just like it is thriving?

ACWA supports state conveyance investment

ACWA submitted a seven-page comment letter Feb. 17 to the California Water Commission  that provided recommendations on the state’s role in financing conveyance projects.  The Commission initiated a series of workshops to gather input in late 2020, acting on a Water Resilience Portfolio directive to “assess a state role in financing conveyance projects that could help meet needs in a changing climate.” The Commission will incorporate comments into a draft whitepaper this spring and final whitepaper with recommendations to policymakers later this year. The workshops and invitation for comments were not associated with the pending proposal to improve conveyance through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay-Delta. ... ”  Read more from ACWA’s Water News here: ACWA supports state conveyance investment

Poor Sacramento & Klamath river salmon forecast for 2021 makes restricted fishing season likely

State and federal fishery managers during the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s annual salmon fishery information on-line meeting today forecast there are about 271,000 adult Sacramento Valley fall-run Chinook salmon now in the ocean off the West Coast.  “This compares to 473,183 forecast a year ago at this time and suggests some restrictions are likely to be enacted in the 2021 salmon fishing season,” reported John McManus, president of the Golden State Salmon Association (www.goldenstatesalmon.org).  In the coming months, officials with the Pacific Fisheries Management Council (PFMC) will use this forecast and other information to set times and areas open to both sport and commercial ocean salmon fishing for 2021. … ”  Read more from the Daily Kos here: Poor Sacramento & Klamath river salmon forecast for 2021 makes restricted fishing season likely

West Coast sea level rising faster than global average

When we hear about our changing climate we often hear about rising sea levels, but where exactly is it rising? … New data shows the global sea level is rising on average 0.13 inches. Notice how the West Coast the past five years is rising on average 0.40 inches per year. That is faster than the global average. There are some factors that can influence the West Coast sea level rise, like El Niño and the PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation). These patterns can bring warmer water temperatures. Warmer water expands and causes water to rise. … ”  Read more from NBC Bay Area here: West Coast sea level rising faster than global average

‘CalPERS is overlaying physical climate risk with water scarcity insights’: California’s Betty Yee on water risk

Ceres’ Director of Water, Kirsten James is speaking to Betty Yee, who was first elected as California State Controller in November 2014 – a position that serves as the state’s chief fiscal officer. She also chairs the California Franchise Tax Board and serves as a member of the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) Boards, representing a combined portfolio of nearly $500bn. She speaks about how her experience managing the world’s fifth-largest economy has shaped her thoughts on climate and water risk. … ”  Read more from Responsible Investor here: ‘CalPERS is overlaying physical climate risk with water scarcity insights’: California’s Betty Yee on water risk

Story map: Creek Fire 2020: Potential Ramifications on Watershed Processes from the Creek Fire in the Upper San Joaquin River Watershed

Upper watersheds, or headwaters, are the foundation of a river. This is especially true with the San Joaquin River, which originates in the high-elevation Eastern Sierra Nevada mountain range, flowing west to the San Joaquin Valley floor. Whatever happens in the upper watersheds affects everything downstream. Wildfires are common in western watersheds and are a natural form of disturbance in forests. Fire can provide long-term benefits to forest and watershed health; however, high intensity or large catastrophic wildfires can result in significant increases in runoff and erosion, which can negatively impact water quality and make predicting runoff more difficult within a watershed. The Creek Fire, which started on September 4th, 2020, has burned a significant portion of the upper watershed that feeds Millerton Lake, the water source for the San Joaquin River Restoration Program (SJRRP). This Story Map explores the upper San Joaquin River watershed, the Creek Fire, and the potential ramifications of the fire on the upper watershed and the SJRRP. … ” View story map here: Creek Fire 2020: Potential Ramifications on Watershed Processes from the Creek Fire in the Upper San Joaquin River Watershed

Drought may cause major problems this year in the Central Valley

More and more signs show drought could cause major problems this year in Central California – affecting everything from the food we grow to the risk of wildfire.  Water flow in the Sierra right now is not only well below average – it looks a lot like the Februaries of 2014 and 2015, which were severe drought years.  Other indicators of water supply don’t look much better. … ”  Read more from KSEE here:  Drought may cause major problems this year in the Central Valley

Some irrigators on West Side of Stanislaus County can expect only 5% of federal water

West Side farmers using the federal Central Valley Project can expect 5% to 75% of their contracted supply this year.  Two straight dry winters brought that announcement Tuesday from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. It involves water pumped from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to as far south as Kern County.  Four irrigation districts totaling about 225,000 acres from Crows Landing to Mendota will get 75% allocations because of water rights predating the CVP’s construction. They agreed in 1939 to stop drawing directly from the San Joaquin River in exchange for future guarantees. ... ”  Read more from the Modesto Bee here: West Side federal water deliveries will range from 5% to 75%

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In regional water news and commentary today …

Eureka council to consider letter addressing water quality concerns

The Eureka City Council is set to consider a letter from the mayor to the state’s Department of Toxic Substances Control, a subdivision of the California Environmental Protection Agency, regarding a potential water contamination hazard.  The letter is on the agenda for the March 2 meeting as a consent calendar item. Unless pulled, all items under consent are typically approved with a single vote with no further readings or discussions.  The letter expresses concern over the now-defunct McNamara and Peepe Lumber Mill site, as the department issued an imminent and substantial determination for the site in April 2008, with little progress being made in addressing the pollutants on site. ... ”  Read more from the Eureka Times-Standard here: Eureka council to consider letter addressing water quality concerns

California Democrats seek to add 535,000 acres of wilderness in state

Humboldt, Trinity and Mendocino counties could play host to part of the largest new designation of federal wilderness in a decade if Democratic sponsors of the land-protection package can find a way through the divided U.S. Senate.  A bill sponsored by Rep. Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael, would designate 257,797 of new acres of wilderness in Northern California while placing 480 miles of river in the region under the nation’s strictest environmental protections for waterways. The bill would designate an additional 49,692 acres as potential wilderness area. … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here: California Democrats seek to add 535,000 acres of wilderness in state

Lawsuit launched to protect imperiled Clear Lake hitch

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a notice of intent today to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for the Clear Lake hitch, a large minnow found only in Northern California’s Clear Lake and its tributaries. The Trump administration denied the fish protection in a December 2020 determination.  Under Trump appointee leadership, the Service asserted that major threats such as the loss of spawning habitat, climate change, drought, and predation and competition from introduced fish are “not likely to adversely affect the overall viability of the Clear Lake hitch in a biologically meaningful way.” This contradicts the conclusions of native fish experts, as well as findings by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and California Fish and Game Commission. … ”  Read more from the Center for Biological Diversity here:  Lawsuit launched to protect imperiled Clear Lake hitch

Nevada Irrigation District to release Draft 2020 Agricultural Water Management Plan

The Nevada Irrigation District (NID) announced Tuesday that it will preview its draft 2020 Agricultural Water Management Plan (AWMP) for the public at evening meetings at 6 p.m. on March 3 and 4 via Zoom. The California Water Code requires agricultural water providers, such as NID, to prepare an Agricultural Water Management Plan every five years. The report includes information about NID’s roughly 5,600 agricultural customers such as past water usage, conservation efforts, and other management elements. The AWMP must be adopted by the NID Board of Directors by April 1, 2021 and is due to the State Department of Water Resources within 30 days of adoption. … ”  Read more from The Union here: Nevada Irrigation District to release Draft 2020 Agricultural Water Management Plan

Thousands of native plants placed near Sacramento River

The organization River Partners teamed up with California State Parks and Butte County Resource Conservation District on Thursday to host a flood plain restoration and reforestation event. The event was called the Bidwell-Sacramento River State Park Riparian Restoration Project and was held near the Pine Creek Access point of the Sacramento River in Chico.  Employees from the organizations helped prepare the ground and plant 27 native species of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants on 25 acres of land which was formerly a state-owned walnut orchard. River Partners Senior Field Manager Ruben Reynoso said that there were 11,000 plants that would be planted on the land. … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here: Thousands of native plants placed near Sacramento River

Bay Area: Backlash grows in wake of Chevron oil spill

On Feb. 9, an oil spill at the Chevron refinery in Richmond released approximately 600 gallons of oil into the San Francisco Bay. The oil spilled for at least two hours before it was stopped and a single containment boom was deployed to initiate clean-up. Many Richmond residents say that response was grossly inadequate, arguing that action should have been taken sooner, that containment efforts should have been more aggressive, and that there is an urgent need for increased transparency as to how the oil spill happened and the status of clean-up efforts. … ”  Read more at SF Weekly here: Bay Area: Backlash grows in wake of Chevron oil spill

Commentary: The SFPUC is tarnishing SF’s record as an environmental leader

Bill Martin and Hunter Cutting with the Sierra Club Bay Chapter write, “San Francisco has long been an international leader on environmental issues. However, water policy has been a stain on that record. The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission has failed to modernize the City’s water policies. Today, Santa Monica — and even Los Angeles and Orange County — are far ahead of San Francisco in water sustainability. The hiring of a new SPFUC General Manager provides the Mayor and the SFPUC commissioners an opportunity to chart a new course on water. ... ”  Read more from the SF Examiner here: The SFPUC is tarnishing SF’s record as an environmental leader

Sequoia & Sierra National Forest Plan revision update

This past year introduced overwhelming challenges to communities in and around the Sequoia and Sierra National Forests. Our communities continue to fight the devastating impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on families, businesses, and local facilities every day. In late 2020, the southern Sierra Nevada faced two uncharacteristically large and destructive wildfires, resulting in long-lasting effects to homes, forest facilities, roads, vegetation, and ecosystems. We understand how important time outdoors is for bringing solace to many people during these trying times, and yet areas are closed due to ongoing hazards and overcrowding remains an issue in other parts of the forests.  These are not easy challenges to overcome, and there will be no easy solutions. However, the forest plan revision process offers us an opportunity to set a collective vision for the future of this landscape and continues to serve as a useful tool to meaningfully address these challenges in a holistic manner. … ”  Read more from the Sierra Sun Times here: Sequoia & Sierra National Forest Plan Revision Update

Commentary:  Is Lompoc’s water quality in danger because of homeless camps?

Ron Fink writes, “On Feb. 2, the Lompoc city manager tried to justify using fees collected to operate and maintain the drinking water utility to pay for homeless camp cleanups in the riverbed by saying that “funding the ongoing costs for cleanup and patrolling from the water enterprise fund would be a legitimate use” because the homeless population and all their litter “sits directly over the city’s potable water source.”  The implication was that the camps were a source of contamination to the water supply.  The staff report did not provide any supporting information for this claim, and even though a citizen had suggested that the council request a history of well water lab analysis for the last 10 years to see if there has been an increase of contaminates that could have come from the camps, not one council member asked for this vital information. … ”  Read more from The Sun here: Is Lompoc’s water quality in danger because of homeless camps?

EPA reaches settlement of Cuyama River oil spill

When a tanker truck overturned on tortuous State Route 166 in March 2020, 4,600 gallons of crude oil on board spilled into the Cuyama River, a “navigable water of the United States” that ultimately reaches the Pacific Ocean. Enforcement of any penalty associated with the spill fell to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which announced a settlement with the truck owner of $80,000 on February 17. … ”  Read more from the Santa Barbara Independent here: EPA reaches settlement of Cuyama River oil spill

Post-wildfire landslides becoming more frequent in Southern California

The results show Californians are now facing a double whammy of increased wildfire and landslide risk caused by climate change-induced shifts in the state’s wet and dry seasons, according to researchers who mapped landslide vulnerability in the southern half of the state.  “This is our attempt to get people thinking about where these hazards are going to occur before there’s even a fire,” said Jason Kean, a hydrologist at the USGS in Denver and lead author of the new study in AGU’s journal Earth’s Future. The journal publishes interdisciplinary research on the past, present and future of our planet and its inhabitants. “By proactively thinking about hazards, you can start to develop more detailed response plans for their inevitability.” … ”  Read more from the USGS here: Post-wildfire landslides becoming more frequent in Southern California

State regulator’s negotiations with Boeing about Santa Susana cleanup sparks criticism

A state department agency that oversees the cleanup of toxic Santa Susana Field lab met confidentially with Boeing Company, one of the polluters, to mediate the cleanup of the area in the hills above the San Fernando and Simi valleys, drawing criticism from a Ventura County supervisor and activists.  In a letter sent on Jan. 22, Grant Cope from the California Department of Toxic Substances Control, or DTSC, a state agency that oversees the cleanup, offered the Boeing Company to “enter into non-binding, confidential mediation” to resolve Boeing’s dispute with DTSC “regarding Boeing’s groundwater corrective measures study and risk assessments at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory,” according to documents released by Watchdog group Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, or PEER. … ”  Read more from the Daily News here:  State regulator’s negotiations with Boeing about Santa Susana cleanup sparks criticism

Monrovia: Rio Hondo and San Gabriel Watershed Restoration Project

The end-of-year federal funding and coronavirus relief bill included a provision authorizing planning with the Army Corps of Engineers to restore creeks and wetlands in the Rio Hondo and San Gabriel Watersheds in Los Angeles County.   The Rio Hondo and San Gabriel Watershed Restoration Project is managed by the Cities of Arcadia, Bradbury, Duarte, Monrovia, and Sierra Madre, along with partnership from the County of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles County Flood Control District. … ”  Read more from The Patch here:  Monrovia: Rio Hondo And San Gabriel Watershed Restoration Project

Oceanside gets $1M federal grant to protect, restore wetlands

A wetland enhancement project in south Oceanside has been selected as the recipient of a $1 million federal grant from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, it was announced Thursday.  The award was issued through the National Coastal Wetlands Conservation grant program, which funds projects that protect, restore and enhance coastal wetland ecosystems. … ”  Read more from Fox 5 here: Oceanside gets $1M federal grant to protect, restore wetlands

San Diego: $44.4 million in MWD overcharges being returned to local water agencies

The San Diego County Water Authority’s Board of Directors today announced a plan to distribute a rebate of $44.4 million to its 24 member agencies across the region after receiving a check for that amount from the Los Angeles-based Metropolitan Water District of Southern California to pay legal damages and interest.  The money resulted from the Water Authority’s decade-long rate case litigation in state Superior Court seeking to compel MWD to set legal rates and repay overcharges. The Water Authority won several critical issues in cases covering 2011-2014 and was deemed the prevailing party, which means the agency is also owed legal fees and charges in addition to the recent damages and interest payment from MWD. … ”  Read more from the Water News Network here: San Diego: $44.4 million in MWD overcharges being returned to local water agencies 

San Diego County extends water closure north to Imperial Beach shoreline

The San Diego County Department of Environmental Health and Quality Thursday extended the existing water contact closure area at the Tijuana Slough shoreline north to include the Imperial Beach shoreline due to sewage contamination.  Sewage-contaminated runoff in the Tijuana River has been entering the Tijuana Estuary, and water sample results indicate contamination of ocean water now extends from the U.S.- Mexico border north through Carnation Avenue in Imperial Beach. … ”  Read more from the Patch here: San Diego County extends water closure north to Imperial Beach shoreline

Scientists predict when beachgoers will get sick from tainted Pacific Ocean

Scientists studying polluted waters which have fouled the Pacific Ocean and Southern California beaches after breaching crumbling wastewater infrastructure in Mexico said Thursday a new scientific prediction model can prevent beachgoers from getting sick.  Scientists with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego held a webinar Thursday with San Diego City Councilwoman Vivian Moreno attended by more than 120 people to discuss strides researchers have made in understanding the way polluted wastewater moves from the Tijuana River Valley to the Pacific Ocean. … ”  Read more from the Courthouse News Service here: Scientists predict when beachgoers will get sick from tainted Pacific Ocean

 

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Along the Colorado River …

Arizona law opens new pathway for water conservation

A bill signed by Governor Doug Ducey last week allows Arizona farmers, ranchers, and other water users to leave water in rivers and streams without the risk of losing their rights to it. The new law modifies a water policy called “use it or lose it” which has been a longstanding roadblock in conservation. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke about the change with Kim Mitchell of Western Resource Advocates. … ”  Read more from KNAU here:  Arizona law opens new pathway for water conservation 

Utah advances bill to create new Colorado River Authority

An amended bill that would create a new 6-member Colorado River Authority charged with managing Utah’s interests in future shares of the Colorado River received a favorable recommendation from the Utah Senate’s Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Committee early Thursday morning. Discussion of the measure lasted just under 30 minutes.  The eventual vote to approve was unanimous among committee members, and several Utah voices spoke in support of the bill before the motion was put to a vote. … ”  Read more from the St. George Spectrum here: Utah advances bill to create new Colorado River Authority

Commentary:  Water rights for tribes is environmental justice

Isaac Humrich, member of American Conservation Coalition writes, “This month, the comment period for a potentially landmark piece of legislation ended. Since California v. Arizona in 2000, the Colorado River Indian Tribes have the sole rights to more than 600,000 acres-feet of water from the Colorado River, but they are barred from selling or leasing any of this water to outside communities. … ”  Read more from the Arizona Capitol Times here: Commentary:  Water rights for tribes is environmental justice

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In national water news today …

Congress on track to approve millions more in federal funding for water debt relief

Even before an initial round of funding is distributed to states and tribes, Congress is preparing to add another $500 million to a first-ever federal assistance program for low-income households that owe money to their water departments.  The House Budget Committee on Monday marked up President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion “American Rescue Plan,” a procedural move that sets the table for a House vote by the end of the week.  The relief package includes $500 million to assist low-income households who are behind on their water bills. … ”  Read more from the Circle of Blue here: Congress on track to approve millions more in federal funding for water debt relief

More than 25 million Americans drink from the worst water systems

Millions of people in the U.S. are drinking water that fails to meet federal health standards, including by violating limits for dangerous contaminants.  Latinos are disproportionately exposed, according to the Guardian’s review of more than 140,000 public water systems across the U.S. and county-level demographic data. Water systems in counties that are 25 percent or more Latino are violating drinking water contamination rules at twice the rate of those in the rest of the country. ... ”  Read more from Consumer Reports here: More than 25 million Americans drink from the worst water systems

The money should have been a bonanza: After tornadoes killed 11 people in Mississippi in early 2014, the federal government approved $14 million to help fortify the state against future disasters.  Mississippi had been battered by 21 major events, including Hurricane Katrina, in the previous 13 years. And it needed cash. The state had the nation’s smallest per capita tax base, the lowest per capita income and the smallest per capita gross domestic product.  But Mississippi spent only $2.6 million of the federal money.  The state’s failure to spend $11.4 million — 81% of the grant — illustrates a widespread and growing problem with one of the main federal programs to reduce the nation’s vulnerability to disasters: Billions of dollars are being shunned. … ”  Read more from E&E News here:  States shun billions in federal aid as climate costs soar

Current steering weather hits slowest speed in 1,000 years

An enormous ocean current that flows between continents in a worldwide circuit that can take centuries to complete is slowing down, scientists say. And climate change may be partly to blame.  New research finds that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, or AMOC — a major ocean system that ferries water and heat between the equator and the poles — is at its weakest point in more than a thousand years.  It’s no small finding. The AMOC — also sometimes referred to as the Gulf Stream system — transports heat throughout the oceans, regulating climate patterns around the globe.  Experts believe the slowing AMOC may already be causing consequences. … ”  Read more from E&E News here: Current steering weather hits slowest speed in 1,000 years

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In commentary today …

Where did all the farmland go? Better planning is badly needed in the Valley

Jenny Toste, formerly chief executive officer of ValleyPBS writes, “What happens in California agriculture affects every American. The Central Valley is the bread basket of the nation, and food security is becoming increasingly important. The world population is projected to grow to 10 billion by 2050, but we don’t know how we are going to feed that many people.  The U.S. requires 1 billion meals a day, and depending on foreign countries for our food — like China or Chile — is a scary proposition. That is why Rep. Jim Costa, the Democrat from Fresno, continues to emphasize that agriculture is a national security issue. ... ”  Read more from the Fresno Bee here: Farmland disappears in Central Valley. More planning needed

California can cut wildfire risk by investing in resilient forests

Chris Paulus, retired battalion chief with Cal Fire writes, “As a 34-year employee of Cal Fire, I am deeply familiar with the consequences of state policy that for too long emphasized putting out all wildfires, rather than emphasizing the natural restorative role fire plays in California’s landscapes.  With Gov. Newsom’s new $1 billion wildfire budget, we have an opportunity to prioritize wildfire resilience rather than just wildfire suppression.  For centuries, wildfire burned California landscapes through lightning and controlled burns set by Indigenous people. It is estimated that a minimum of 4.5 million acres burned annually, yielding landscapes that could endure wildfire and thrive. … ”  Read more from Capitol Weekly here: California can cut wildfire risk by investing in resilient forests

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National water and climate update …

The Natural Resources Conservation Service produces this weekly report using data and products from the National Water and Climate Center and other agencies. The report focuses on seasonal snowpack, precipitation, temperature, and drought conditions in the U.S.

dmrpt-20210225

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Today’s featured articles …

ESTUARY PEARLS: Bay-Delta research from the most recent issue of San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science. Plus: Can otters thrive in San Francisco Bay?

Click here to read this article.


SCIENCE NEWS: Rumble in the river: brook vs. bull trout; Delta smelt on the brink; Hydrologic models may misidentify snow as rain; New method to track genetic diversity of salmon, trout; A promising forecast for predictive science; and more …

Click here to read this article.

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Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ DSC Member~ DSC Meeting~ DPAC Meeting~ ISB Meeting~ DPC Report~~

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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