WEEKLY WATER NEWS DIGEST for Jan 31 – Feb 5: The pros and cons of the voluntary agreements; How different genetically are fall-run and spring-run chinook salmon?; plus all the week’s top water news and more …

A wrap-up of posts published on Maven’s Notebook this week …

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This week’s featured articles …

NEVADA IRRIGATION DISTRICT considers joining voluntary agreement efforts in the Delta watershed

At the January 13, 2020 meeting of the Nevada Irrigation District, David Guy from the Northern California Water Association gave a presentation on the efforts to negotiate voluntary agreements for the Delta watershed that would serve as an alternative to the State Water Board’s update to the Bay-Delta Water Quality Control Plan.

Mr. Guy began by noting that state, federal, and local agencies are committed to fixing the ecosystem problems within the Sacramento River and Delta watershed.  These agencies and NGOs have been working on a collaborative approach called the voluntary agreements, which would improve river flows and restore habitat to help recover native species in the Delta, as well as provide funding for continuing science efforts.  He noted that the Voluntary Agreements might catalyze localized innovative actions and project-specific activities that may improve aquatic environments while building long term resiliency through California’s water systems.

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PLANNING & CONSERVATION LEAGUE: The Bay-Delta Water Quality Control Plan: Where is it at?

Panel at PCL’s Environmental Assembly focuses on the lack of progress on the Bay-Delta Water Quality Control Plan update and the voluntary agreements

Water quality and flows in the Bay-Delta watershed have long been a disputed topic. Under the Clean Water Act, the state must develop a plan to protect water quality and to update this plan every three years.  The last time a Bay-Delta Water Quality Control plan was adopted was in 1995 – over 25 years ago.  The State Water Board initiated its process to update the Bay-Delta Plan in 2009; to date, the Board has adopted standards for Phase 1, which dealt with San Joaquin River flows and southern Delta salinity issues; however, those standards have yet to be implemented, and the bulk of the work on the rest of the Delta has yet to be finished, even in draft form.  In the 2020 Water Resilience Portfolio, Governor Newsom set a state goal not to update the Bay-Delta Water Quality Control Plan but rather to focus on developing voluntary agreements.

At the first set of webinars of the Planning and Conservation League’s 2021 Environmental Assembly held just last week, a panel discussed the problems with using voluntary agreements to regulate water use and strategies on how to convince the Newsom administration to focus on updating the Water Quality Control Plan.  Panelists were Gary Bobker with the Bay Institute; Dr. Jon Rosenfield with the San Francisco Baykeeper; Tam Doduc with the State Water Board; and Rachel Zwillinger with Defenders of Wildlife.

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DELTA LEAD SCIENTIST REPORT: How different genetically are fall-run and spring-run chinook salmon?; Social science in the Delta; and activities of the Delta Science Program

At the January meeting of the Delta Stewardship Council, Delta Lead Scientist Dr. Laurel Larsen discussed the recent science publication, ‘A complex phenotype in salmon controlled by a simple change in migratory timing.’ She also introduced Dr. Jessica Rudnick, the new California Sea Grant Social Science Extension Specialist hired to work in the Delta and updated the Council on the Delta Science Program’s ongoing activities.

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In California water news this week …

Sierra Nevada snowpack still below average after winter storms

The California Department of Water Resources performed a snow survey Wednesday, the results of which were decidedly mixed.  “The state experienced a series of storms over the past couple of weeks that dropped significant amounts of rain and snow,” said Sean de Guzman, the water department’s chief of snow surveys. “But it’s not nearly enough to make up the deficit we’ve experienced the last few months.” … ”  Read more from the Courthouse News Service here: Sierra Nevada snowpack still below average after winter storms

New federal law may boost Delta, Bay restoration, protection

The major Northern California waterways may be getting a renewed lease on their ecological and economic lives, as federal support for protection and restoration of the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary could nearly double in coming years following enactment last month of the Protect and Restore America’s Estuaries Act.  As one of 28 “estuaries of national significance” eligible for funding through the new law, the San Francisco Estuary and other estuaries along every U.S. coast each may now receive as much as $1 million a year in federal aid, Caitlin Sweeney, director of the San Francisco Estuary Partnership, noted in a press release issued Tuesday. … ”  Read more from the Vacaville Reporter here: New federal law may boost Delta, Bay restoration, protection

High-tech forecasting model scores scientific win at Lake Mendocino, showing promise for western reservoirs

Sandbars are spreading across rain-starved Lake Mendocino, the reservoir near Ukiah that is 35 feet lower than it was a year ago, a grim wintertime sight for the second major source of water for more than 655,000 people in Sonoma, Mendocino and Marin counties.  But the situation would be considerably worse without the payoff from a six-year, $50 million project applying high-tech weather forecasting to management of the reservoir behind Coyote Valley Dam built on the East Fork of the Russian River in 1958.  Thanks to the project, which replaces an inflexible dam operations manual with meteorological science unknown six decades ago, there is 20% more water — nearly 12,000 acre feet — now in Lake Mendocino as the North Bay teeters on the brink of drought. … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here:  High-tech forecasting model scores scientific win at Lake Mendocino, showing promise for western reservoirs

Despite rainfall, state still aiming for 55 gallon per person water conservation target

Fresh off a week filled with rain and snow due to an atmospheric river, water conservation may not be top of mind for everyday Californians.  NBC Bay Area Meteorologist Rob Mayeda just broke down some figures from this latest storm. In a Friday tweet he says, “Sierra Snowpack Surge: Up to 66% of average from just 40% one week ago. Biggest rains for the Central and Southern Sierra.”  While the recent precipitation may make the 2011-2017 California drought seem like a distant memory, a couple of laws passed by the legislature at that time are set to rain down policy on water agencies throughout the state. … ”  Read more from GV Wire here: Despite rainfall, state still aiming for 55 gallon per person water conservation target

California’s rainy season now starts a month later than it used to

The start of California’s rainy season has been getting progressively later in recent decades, and now begins a month after it did just 60 years ago, shifting from November to December, according to a new study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. Scientists say the delay in the start of the rain has prolonged the state’s wildfire season and exacerbated water shortages.  Last year was California’s worst wildfire season on record, with nearly 10,000 fires burning more than 4.2 million acres.  “What we’ve shown is that it will not happen in the future, it’s happening already,” Jelena Luković, a climate scientist at the University of Belgrade in Serbia and lead author of the new study, said in a statement. … ”  Read more from Yale e360 here:  California’s rainy season now starts a month later than it used to

A $5 billion water project could drill through Anza-Borrego park. Is it a pipe dream?

It would be arguably the most ambitious public works project in San Diego history.  The envisioned pipeline would carry Colorado River water more than 130 miles from the Imperial Valley — through the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, tunneling under the Cuyamaca Mountains, and passing through the Cleveland National Forest — to eventually connect with a water-treatment plant in San Marcos.  An alternative route would run through the desert to the south, boring under Mt. Laguna before emptying into the San Vicente Reservoir in Lakeside.  Estimated cost: roughly $5 billion. New water delivered: None. … ”  Read more from the San Diego Union-Tribune here: A $5 billion water project could drill through Anza-Borrego park. Is it a pipe dream?

A legal win for city finance – Supreme Court holds utility rates not subject to referendum

Ben Franklin famously said, “When the well is dry, we know the worth of water.” The recent California Supreme Court decision in Wilde v. City of Dunsmuir is an important win for public utilities and local governments that boosts stability in local finance by holding that water rates are not subject to referendum. The logic of the case also suggests that utility fees, like solid waste, sewer, and power fees, are not subject to referendum either.   Referendum is a power granted to voters by Article II, section 9 of the California Constitution. It essentially allows the electorate to put statutes adopted by legislative bodies to a vote of the people, subject to certain exceptions. … ”  Read more from Western City here:  A legal win for city finance – Supreme Court holds utility rates not subject to referendum

State fisheries biologists continue efforts to eradicate deadly fish bacteria

Eight months after a bacterial outbreak in CDFW fish hatcheries led to the massive depletion of stocks, state fisheries biologists are still working hard on recovery efforts and a plan to stock California’s waters for anglers in 2021 and beyond.  Prior to the initial discovery at the Mojave River Hatchery in April 2020, the bacteria, Lactococcus garvieae, had not been found in California in aquaculture facilities or in the wild. Extensive testing of all CDFW hatcheries found the bacteria to be present in fish at the Fish Springs Hatchery and Black Rock Hatchery as well. Fish at all three hatcheries were immediately quarantined and ultimately 3.1 million trout were euthanized after treatment efforts were unsuccessful. … ”  Read more from the Department of Fish & Wildlife here: State fisheries biologists continue efforts to eradicate deadly fish bacteria

New Delta carbon market could boost Bay Area water security

Hundreds of thousands of people in the Bay Area get their water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, but this vital source is imperiled. Islands in the heart of the Delta have lost so much soil — literally tons — that they have sunk far below sea level, weakening the levees that protect them. Levee breaks would flood the islands, pulling in brine from the San Francisco Bay and rendering the water too salty to drink. Now, a new state program aims to reverse subsidence in the Delta and so help secure its water supply. … ”  Read more from the Bay Area Monitor here: New Delta carbon market could boost bay area water security

FEMA releases additional reimbursement funds for Oroville spillways repairs and reconstruction

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) has received notification that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has released an additional $308 million in requested funds for the Oroville Dam spillways reconstruction and emergency response. These funds are in addition to the $260 million that FEMA has already committed to for repairs to the lower portion of the main spillway and other work conducted in response to the emergency.  The $308 million in additional funding was initially rejected by FEMA but was subsequently approved last year following appeal from DWR. “We appreciate the continued hard work of our partners at FEMA and the California Office of Emergency Services, as well as our representatives in Congress, to ensure California received these funds,” said Ted Craddock, DWR Deputy Director of the State Water Project.  DWR continues to work with Cal OES and FEMA to secure additional reimbursement funds for work on the emergency spillway.  … ”  Continue reading this press release from DWR here:  FEMA releases additional reimbursement funds for Oroville spillways repairs and reconstruction

Winery wastewater guidelines impact half of all California operations

A new set of winery wastewater guidelines will be imposed on a statewide basis. The State Water Resources Control Board recently adopted a general order regulating how wastewater will be processed and discharged. Traditionally there have been regional guidelines, but the new order will be the first statewide mandate applied to wastewater from wineries.  “What the state water board adopted last week will apply to a wide array of California wineries and require them to get a permit from their regional water quality control boards to continue their operations,” said Noelle Cremers, Director of Environmental and Regulatory Affairs for the Wine Institute. “It’s our estimation that about 1,500 wineries will be subject to the order.” … ”  Read more from Ag Net West here: Winery wastewater guidelines impact half of all California operations

Rural Valley cities secure permanent water supply in deal with Feds

Three rural Valley cities finalized deals with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to cement permanent access to water from the Central Valley Project on Monday, the Federal bureau announced.  The cities of Avenal, Coalinga, and Huron converted their water contracts with Federal water authorities along with Firebaugh-based Pacheco Water District and Panoche Water District, and Los Banos-based San Luis Water District.  The move signals an end to negotiations that took over a year and a half to complete. … ”  Read more from the San Joaquin Valley Sun here: Rural Valley cities secure permanent water supply in deal with Feds

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In regional water news this week …

What will Iron Gate, Copco, JC Boyle reservoirs look like after dam removal? KRRC says it will be beautiful

The plan to remove four Klamath dams took another small step forward on Friday as the Klamath River Renewal Corporation announced they’ve signed a contract with a Texas-based company to restore the area where dams and their reservoirs currently exist.  Once the dams are removed and the Klamath River returns to its pre-dam path, Resource Environment Solutions has been tapped to restore native vegetation to the area currently covered by water and reestablish fish habitat by reconnecting tributaries. … ”  Read more from the Siskiyou Daily News here:  What will Iron Gate, Copco, JC Boyle reservoirs look like after dam removal? KRRC says it will be beautiful

Sea level rise on the North Coast

A few weeks ago, local pilot Tim Hanan flew over the southern portion of the Eel River delta in the area of Centerville Beach. Our 5-year design effort with The Wildlands Conservancy and agricultural landowners included the former tidelands just to the north of Centerville.  Small wave incursions over the dunes began about 20 years ago, and have been slowly increasing, but earlier this month all hell broke loose. A major portion of the Centerville dune system is now washed away by high tides and large storm surge, a catastrophic loss. A large area of productive agricultural lands were damaged. It appears the whole dune system south of the Eel River mouth is slowly unzipping, moving south to north. ... ”  Read more from Cal Trout here: Sea level rise on the north coast

Pleasanton city council drops pursuit for potable water

Pleasanton is no longer pursuing potable reuse as a water supply alternative after the City Council voted 3-2 to stop studying the matter with other regional agencies on Tuesday.  In addition to ending Pleasanton’s participation in evaluating a regional potable reuse project with the Zone 7 Water Agency, Danville San Ramon Services District and city of Livermore, among others, the council directed $300,000 from the capital improvement program that was earmarked for more potable water studies be used to treat hazardous per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in Well #8, which is owned by the city and currently out of operation. … ”  Read more from Pleasanton Weekly here: Pleasanton city council drops pursuit for potable water

Future of Monterey Peninsula water could be determined by new board appointees

Four new Monterey Peninsula representatives on key local water and wastewater agency boards could have a big say on the future of two Monterey Peninsula water issues — the proposed California American Water public takeover and the Pure Water Monterey expansion proposal.  Last week, Monterey architect Safwat Malek was unanimously chosen to replace Molly Evans as Monterey Peninsula Water Management Agency Division 3 director from a slate of five candidates during a special water district board meeting on Jan. 28. … ”  Read more from the Monterey Herald here:  Future of Monterey Peninsula water could be determined by new board appointees

Citing climate change, LADWP ends free water deal for Long Valley ranchers and sparks anger among conservationists

Since the early 1920s, the Long Valley plains east of Yosemite have inspired comparison to a rustic Western paradise — an idyllic frontier where sparkling creeks meander through lush pastures, waters teem with feisty trout and sage grouse make ostentatious displays of romance.  Much of this great, green expansiveness, however, owes to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which aggressively purchased land and water rights here more than a century ago. The department’s routine annual deliveries of free surplus water to its tenants have helped sustain ranching operations and habitat here for many decades. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here: Citing climate change, LADWP ends free water deal for Long Valley ranchers and sparks anger among conservationists

LADWP: Correcting the record regarding Louis Sahagun’s Los Angeles Times Story and LADWP’s relationship with Mono County ranchers

On January 30, 2021, the Los Angeles Times published a story, authored by Louis Sahagun, discussing the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s relationship with ranchers in Mono County. This relationship has faced increased scrutiny over the past few years and along with it we’ve witnessed an increased misrepresentation of the facts – this story proved to be no exception. Even after providing detailed background information, the author, unfortunately, elected to perpetuate a one-sided story, which although providing heightened dramatic flair, is not reflective of the current realities and facts. While we discuss the inaccuracies with the writer and editor, we wanted to provide you with the facts. ... ”  Continue reading at LADWP here: Correcting the record regarding Louis Sahagun’s Los Angeles Times Story and LADWP’s relationship with Mono County ranchers

Winners and losers: SLO County supervisors are hoping new rules for the Paso Robles water basin will give smaller farmers more flexibility

When given a chance, San Luis Obispo County 5th District Supervisor Debbie Arnold is eager to talk about the flaws she sees in the county ordinance governing water use in the Paso Robles Groundwater Basin.  Arnold finds it inherently unfair. In 2013, amid drought and dried-up wells, the Board of Supervisors essentially banned any new or expanded groundwater use over the aquifer that could not be offset by a reduction in pumping.  Striving for water neutrality, the county hoped the policy could help stabilize an overpumped basin that supports 40 percent of SLO County’s agricultural economy and thousands of rural residents.  But more than seven years later, Arnold laments how the ordinance created winners and losers. … ”  Continue reading at New Times SLO here:  Winners and losers: SLO County supervisors are hoping new rules for the Paso Robles water basin will give smaller farmers more flexibility

Santa Barbara approves sea-level rise adaptation plan

The global climate crisis continues to exacerbate many precarious environmental issues, and for coastal cities like Santa Barbara, the detrimental impacts of rising temperatures on flooding and erosion are all too apparent. In order to proactively address these concerns, the City Council unanimously approved a resolution to implement an adaptation plan to alleviate the effects of rising sea levels along Santa Barbara’s shoreline.  The proposal, which projected that sea levels will increase by 0.8 feet by the year 2030, encompassed both short-term and long-term recommended courses of action as well as a structure for future decision-making in the face of unpredictable environmental changes. … ”  Read more from the Santa Barbara Independent here: Santa Barbara approves sea-level rise adaptation plan

Residents report unprecedented amount of trash washing up on Malibu beaches

Malibu residents and visitors to Paradise Cove, Big Dume and Little Dume Beaches say they are horrified by the amount of trash floating in the water and washing up on the shore beginning in mid January. The trash accumulated in large piles ashore and included everything from dozens of used needles (medical waste) to a dead dog.  One local, Alexa Woodward, said she and a friend were out on the water doing some stand-up paddle boarding near Little Dume, going south toward Paradise Cove on Jan.17 when they found themselves surrounded by refuse. … ”  Read more from the Santa Monica Daily Press here:  Residents report unprecedented amount of trash washing up on Malibu beaches

Rindge Dam Removal and Malibu Creek Ecosystem Restoration

Dams built along the Pacific Coast over the past 150 years were constructed for flood protection, water security and energy, yet the magnitude and scope of their disruption to ecosystems has been slow to realize and reverse. Some dam removal projects – such as the Klamath Dams – affect not only watershed processes but interweave environmental, geographical, political, cultural and economic issues.  Removal of Rindge Dam in Malibu Creek, an obsolete structure that has not functioned as intended for 80 years, is a less complicated case. The dam removal project is now poised to proceed into design phase, following recent authorization of the project’s feasibility study led by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and pending formal approval in Congress. … ”  Read more from Cal Trout here: Rindge Dam Removal and Malibu Creek Ecosystem Restoration

Water lawsuit settled with Redlands and 2 other cities in San Bernardino County

A lawsuit against several cities and the county of San Bernardino over failing to file water efficiency reports required by the state has been settled and the jurisdictions are now working on fulfilling the terms of the settlements.  The Natural Resources Defense Council estimated 340 cities and counties in the state did not file one or more annual reports on permit programs for new irrigated landscapes, robbing the public of critical information regarding local conservation efforts.  The lawsuit was filed in December 2019 against Redlands, Chino Hills, Rancho Cucamonga and the county. … ”  Read more from the Redlands Daily Facts here: Water lawsuit settled with Redlands and 2 other cities in San Bernardino County

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Along the Colorado River …

Nevada: 9th Circuit to District Court: Consider ‘public trust’ remedies in Walker Lake case

A legal effort to bring more water to Walker Lake will stay afloat.  In a ruling last week, a federal appellate court said Mineral County could continue to pursue its claim to require policymakers to restore the shrunken lake. It’s a major development in a case that is being closely watched by environmental groups and water users across the state. “It’s a victory for us,” said Simeon Herskovits, an attorney representing Mineral County.  The litigation centers on the Walker River, which is fed by snowmelt from the eastern Sierra and snakes through Nevada, emptying into Walker Lake along U.S. 95, just outside of Hawthorne. … ”  Read more from the Nevada Independent here: Nevada: 9th Circuit to District Court: Consider ‘public trust’ remedies in Walker Lake case

Shrinking Lake Mead inches closer to water shortage declaration

Projections from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation show Lake Mead is in danger of dropping low enough to trigger its first federally declared water shortage next year.  A study this month from the Bureau of Reclamation, based on minimum probable inflow, shows Lake Mead, now at 1,085 feet, could end the year below 1,070 feet.  If projections in August show the lake level dropping below 1,075 feet at that time, a federal shortage will be declared. ... ”  Read more from the Las Vegas Review-Journal here: Shrinking Lake Mead inches closer to water shortage declaration

Proposed river authority would assert Utah’s claims to the Colorado’s dwindling water

Utah legislative leaders on Thursday unveiled plans for a new $9 million state agency to advance Utah’s claims to the Colorado River in hopes of wrangling more of the river’s diminishing flows, potentially at the expense of six neighboring states that also tap the river.  Without any prior public involvement or notice, lawmakers assembled legislation to create a six-member entity called the Colorado River Authority of Utah, charged with implementing “a management plan to ensure that Utah can protect and develop the Colorado River system.” … ”  Read more from the Salt Lake Tribune here: Proposed river authority would assert Utah’s claims to the Colorado’s dwindling water

In national water news this week …

February 2021 outlook: A winter’s chill forecast across central and western United States

February is smack dab in the middle of winter, which for snow lovers means hoping for cold and wet conditions. So what does the February 2021outlook from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center show? Well, some hope? Colder and wetter-than-average conditions are favored across the north-central United States, with the wet signal also extended towards the East, and the cold signal extended west. Compared to previous monthly outlooks where warmth was favored, the February forecast is actually one where cold is likely to dominate.  A reminder: the climate outlook maps are not a forecast for the absolute temperature or precipitation amounts in February. Instead, they are the probability (percent chance) that February temperatures or precipitation will be in the upper, middle, or lower third of the climatological record (1981-2010) for February (note: the climatological record will shift to 1991-2020 later this year). … ”  Read more from Climate.gov here: February 2021 outlook: A winter’s chill forecast across central and western United States

Moratoria on utility shutoffs and evictions reduced covid-19 infection rates, Duke University analysis finds

Policies that helped financially struggling Americans stay in their homes and keep access to water and electricity during the COVID-19 pandemic also helped reduce the spread of the virus, according to a new analysis by Duke University researchers.  Eviction moratoria and relief from utility disconnections reduced COVID-19 cases by 8.2 percent from the onset of the pandemic through the end of November 2020, the authors found. The findings were published Monday as a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper. Newly inaugurated President Joe Biden has proposed a $1.9 trillion relief package to provide rental and utility assistance for those hardest hit by the pandemic’s economic fallout. … ”  Read more from Duke University here:  Moratoria on utility shutoffs and evictions reduced covid-19 infection rates, Duke University analysis finds

The covid-19 pandemic’s continued toll on drinking water systems and their customers

Water systems across the country are facing budget shortfalls as a result of the pandemic and need assistance. For small water systems (systems serving 10,000 people or fewer) total budget shortfalls are estimated to be $4 to 6 billion, primarily caused by decreased demand, delayed payments, and additional costs for protective equipment and sick time.  At the end of 2020, an estimated 12 million workers still remained unemployed due to job loss or other impacts from the pandemic. These individuals, in addition to those already unemployed or struggling to make ends meet prior to the pandemic, are unlikely to be able to afford regular monthly bills, such as for water. This only adds to utility revenue challenges. … ”  Read more from the Pacific Institute here: The covid-19 pandemic’s continued toll on drinking water systems and their customers

Justice department tosses Trump-era environmental directives

The Justice Department has withdrawn a series of Trump-era policies that constrain the agency’s environmental enforcement tools.  Deputy Assistant Attorney General Jean E. Williams, a career official who is currently leading DOJ’s Environment and Natural Resources Division, issued a memo Thursday eliminating a series of directives from Trump appointees, including an unpopular ban on settlement devices called a supplemental environmental projects, or SEPs.  The move is part of a major shift expected in how the Justice Department enforces the nation’s environmental statutes. … ”  Read more from Bloomberg Law here: Justice department tosses Trump-era environmental directives

Weekly features …

BLOG ROUND-UP: The floodplain forward; Winter pulsed flow for salmon needed now; Storms didn’t bring the winter of our drought-stricken discontent; and more …

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Announcements, notices, and funding opportunities …

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: 2021 CDFW Prop 1 FAQ, Application Workshop Recording and Presentation

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: 2021 Fisheries Restoration Grant Program PSN and Guidelines for Public Comments

THE CURRENT: Rewinding through Cal Trout’s history; Rindge Dam removal, Hat Creek: From past to present; Search for the Kern River rainbow; and more …

WATER INNOVATIONS: Pandemic concerns; Co-digesting food waste and wastewater solids; Acoustic leak detection; and more …

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ DPC Audio~ ISB Meeting~ Canceled Meeting~ Scavenger Hunt~ Annual Report ~~

WATER PLAN eNEWS: ~~SGMA Webinar~ IRWM Webinar~ Water Recommendations~ Climate Report~ Headwater Forests~Stream Gaging~ Ag Tech ~~

NOTICE: New prize competition seeks to improve reliability of water deliveries for America’s crops by reducing water seeping from canals

NOTICE: CDFA announces stakeholder engagement opportunities on farmer- and rancher-led climate-change solutions

CA WELL STANDARDS: Updating Bulletin 74, California Well Standards: DWR Convenes Technical Advisory Committee for Update of Well Standards

SGMO NEWS: Joint DWR-State Water Board general SGMA webinar; SGMA water year type dataset now available; How to report domestic wells going dry; and more …

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