WEEKLY WATER NEWS DIGEST for Jan. 24 – 29: The What, Why, and How of Groundwater Modeling; DWR Director Nemeth gives an update on Delta conveyance; Water Commission screening for new projects; and more …

A wrap-up of posts published on Maven’s Notebook this week …

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This week’s featured articles …

FEATURE: The What, Why, and How of Groundwater Modeling

Abishek Singh, Ph.D., is Vice President of Intera’s Western Region based out of Los Angeles.  His professional experience has focused on research and application experience in groundwater and surface water modeling, planning and decision analysis, risk and uncertainty analyses, optimization techniques, and temporal/spatial statistics. He has expertise in developing, calibrating, and applying hydrologic and data-driven models to support robust water-resources decision-making.

In a recent webinar presented by Intera, Dr. Singh gave a presentation explaining what groundwater models are, uses for groundwater models, how groundwater models work, and provided some case studies.

Click here to read this post.


WATER ASSN OF KERN COUNTY: DWR Director Karla Nemeth gives an update on the Delta Conveyance Project

The Delta Conveyance Project is the Newsom Administration’s plan to construct a tunnel and other facilities that would carry water from the Sacramento River to State Water Project facilities in the south Delta.

Kern County, the second-largest participant in the State Water Project with a contract for 982,730 acre-feet of water per year, recently voted to participate in the project.  In January of 2021, the Water Association of Kern County hosted a webinar with Karla Nemeth, the Director of the Department of Water Resources.  She gave an update on the Delta Conveyance Project, as well as touched on other efforts of interest to Kern County.

Click here to read this article.


CA WATER COMMISSION: Screening process for eligible water storage projects; Commission continues conveyance conversation

At the December 2020 meeting, the California Water Commission approved moving forward with a screening process to find potential projects that could be eligible for the Water Storage Investment Program after the Temperance Flat project stalled and withdrew from the program.  The screening process is designed to discover potential projects that could meet the statutory deadlines outlined in Water Code Section 79757, which requires the commission to make findings of feasibility for all water shortage investment program funded projects before January 1, 2022. …

The California Water Commission is in the process of assessing the state’s role in financing conveyance projects that could help meet needs in a changing climate, as tasked by action 19.4 in the Water Resilience Portfolio.  This work advances the portfolio’s goal of promoting statewide water resilience and reinforces the role that the Commission plays as the primary public forum for the discussion of improving water management policy to assist regions in achieving climate resiliency, as stated in goal one of the Commission’s strategic plan.  At the California Water Commission’s January meeting, Assistant Executive Officer Laura Jensen reviewed the information presented by the expert panel on December on public benefits, discussed a list of public benefits that the state might fund, and how those benefits could be valued. …

Click here to read this article.

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In California water news this week …

Kings River floodwater dispute goes to the state

A bid by Kern County farmers to take Kings River floodwater officially got underway Tuesday as state regulators hashed out procedures and next steps with the various parties.  An initial hearing had been set for April 15, but may now be pushed back to July, depending on how Administrative Hearing Officer Nicole Kuenzi rules.  Kuenzi discussed coming deadlines and other procedural issues with representatives of the Kings River Water Association, Semitropic Water Storage District and others during a pre-hearing conference Tuesday morning. … ”  Read more from SJV Water here: Kings River floodwater dispute goes to the state

Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) releases the Human Right to Water Tool

The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) announces the release of its final Human Right to Water Framework and Data Tool (CalHRTW 1.0)—comprised of an interactive web tool and report, Achieving the Human Right to Water in California: An Assessment of the State’s Community Water Systems.  In developing the Human Right to Water Framework and Data Tool, California becomes the first state in the country to develop a tool for measuring the progressive realization of the human right to water.  This tool alongside other key statewide efforts signals California’s leadership and commitment in providing safe, affordable and accessible water to all. … ”  Read more and access the tool here:  The Human Right to Water Tool

‘The most basic form of PPE’: 1.6 million households face water shutoffs

The first thing Deborah Bell-Holt does each morning is check whether water still flows from her bathroom faucet.  It always does, thanks to an April executive order from Gov. Gavin Newsom banning water disconnections during the pandemic. But that didn’t stop her utility debt from snowballing to nearly $15,000.  “They say you’re safe,” said the 67-year-old retired nurse, who manages finances for her household of twelve in South Los Angeles. “But you see that bill. How is that supposed to make you feel? You’re scared to death.” … ”  Read more from Cal Matters here: ‘The most basic form of PPE’: 1.6 million households face water shutoffs

Advocates for fish, and canoeing, win a round in debate over Tuolumne River flows

A federal agency has ruled that the state can continue to seek higher flows on the Tuolumne River than planned by the Modesto and Turlock irrigation districts.  The Jan. 19 ruling drew cheers from environmental and fishing groups that have long sought larger releases from Don Pedro Reservoir into the lower river.  MID and TID vowed to appeal the ruling within the required 30 days. It involves a pending license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to operate Don Pedro for up to 50 more years. … ”  Read more from the Modesto Bee here:  Advocates for fish, and canoeing, win a round in debate over Tuolumne River flows

California salmon deaths traced to thiamine deficiency

The biologists working in a fish hatchery near Shasta Dam grew increasingly concerned last year when newly hatched salmon fry began to act strangely — swimming around and around, in tight, corkscrewing motions, before spiraling to their deaths at the bottom of the tanks.  Certain runs of chinook salmon in California are imperiled; the hatcheries and the fry raised there are the federal government’s last-ditch effort to sustain these ecologically and economically vital fish populations.  So, when scientists observed the young salmon’s screwball behavior, they reached out to their networks in oceanography, ecology and fisheries: Had anyone seen anything similar? Did anybody know what was going on? … ”  Read more from the LA Times here: Something was killing baby salmon. Scientists traced it to a food-web mystery

Q/A with Molly White, Chief, State Water Operations: How DWR manages water allocations to the state’s public water agencies

Molly, take us through some of the fundamentals of your job.  What are some of the big considerations when it comes to water supply planning and moving water around the state?  Molly White: You bet.  There are many considerations that we take into account when we are developing our water supply and allocation studies.  I’ll talk about a few of those here today.  One significant component is hydrology, and that includes not only rainfall but also snow pack and the runoff forecasts that we receive that show how much water and tell us how much water is coming into our reservoirs as well as how much water is moving through the system as it runs off from the snow pack as it melts in the spring. … ”  Read more from DWR News here:  Q/A: How does DWR manage water allocations to the state’s public water agencies?

Farmers’ planting plans hinge on water, pandemic

As California farmers weigh decisions on what to plant and how much, lack of rainfall so far this winter has further clouded a 2021 crop outlook already complicated by market uncertainties created by the pandemic.  With current precipitation levels looking even drier than the 2014-15 drought years, Kings County farmer Brian Medeiros said he’s already making decisions about what ground to fallow. He noted that if he does not receive surface-water deliveries and must rely on groundwater all year, it becomes cost-prohibitive to grow many of the field crops that have been core to his business.  “At this point, other than keeping the trees alive, I don’t know that there’s going to be much of anything else that we’re going to do,” Medeiros said. … ”  Read more from Ag Alert here:  Farmers’ planting plans hinge on water, pandemic

California to impose first statewide rules for winery wastewater, marking new era

Hundreds of California wineries will for the first time be governed by statewide wastewater processing rules, a change from the long-held, regional approach that could increase production costs for wineries and protections for waterways while providing consistency for vintners across the state.  The move toward a statewide regulatory framework, a five-year effort championed by industry leaders, was finalized this week by the State Water Resources Control Board, which approved an order setting up guidelines for wastewater processing at most of the more than 3,600 bonded wineries in the state. … ”  Read more from the Sonoma Index-Tribune here: California to impose first statewide rules for winery wastewater, marking new era

New research points to over reliance on managed aquifer recharge

Managed aquifer recharge (MAR), also known as water banking, stores water to be available for use in dry years when surface water supplies are low. It’s a remarkable technology but, groundwater agencies are too reliant on it, according to research by Nicola Ulibarri, assistant professor of urban planning and public policy, and colleagues.  In their study, published this month in Water Resources Research, Ulibarri and her co-authors Nataly Escobedo Garcia, Rebecca L. Nelson, Amanda E. Cravens and Ryan J. McCarty argue that the groundwater agencies seem to be overly relying on MAR to fix their sustainability problems.  “The parts of California that we’re studying — the places that are required to come up with groundwater sustainability plans — are places that are in critical overdraft, which means that they are using more groundwater than is sustainable long term. This has led to the many problems that the state’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) of 2014 aims to address, like overdraft, land subsidence and interconnected surface water,” Ulibarri explains. … ” Read more from UC Irvine here: New research points to over reliance on managed aquifer recharge

Mapping ground subsidence

Subsidence of land surfaces has increasingly become a greater concern around the world as groundwater has continued to be depleted due to increase water demand while surface water depletion means that populations increasingly look to use subsurface water.  The lowering of Earth’s land surfaces promises to be a major problem for urban and rural regions and mapping these threats accurately may prove important to plan, prevent, and minimize this threat.  Using a literature review and spatial analysis, it is evident that some 34 countries are at major risk in the coming decades for major subsidence of their land surface. In particular, a recent mapping effort that looks at every 30 arc seconds resolution across the globe identified that very flat areas with unconsolidated sediments accumulated in alluvial basins or coastal plains are the most vulnerable. … ”  Read more from GIS Lounge here: Mapping ground subsidence

As storm sets up to pummel Tahoe, meteorologists forecast a future without snow

As the year’s first major storm arrived in Lake Tahoe, meteorologists and climate scientists convened on the South Shore this week for the 24th Operation Sierra Storm, a leading nationwide conference about weather. Due to the pandemic, attendance was limited to 25 people, with panels and speakers livestreamed on Facebook. The conference opened Monday morning with a panel about climate change in California and Lake Tahoe.  Panelists forecast a grim outlook for the rest of the century. Climate models predict that storms like the one arriving this week will deliver more rain than snow to Lake Tahoe, a warming trend that will wreak havoc on future ski days. … ”  Read more from SF Gate here:  As storm sets up to pummel Tahoe, meteorologists forecast a future without snow

Garamendi appointed to Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee

California Congressman John Garamendi is being appointed by his congressional colleagues to the Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee, a responsibility he doesn’t take lightly. … ”  Read more from KSRO here: Garamendi appointed to Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee

Biden halts new oil drilling on federal lands. Here’s what major climate move means for California

President Biden, acting quickly to differentiate his climate agenda from his predecessor’s, rolled out a slate of environmental directives Wednesday, including a far-reaching suspension of new oil and gas development on federal land and waters.  The indefinite moratorium is widely viewed as a first step to halting the granting of federal drilling leases permanently, and it marks a milestone in California’s half-century fight to keep the federal government from expanding fossil fuel extraction across the state. … ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here: Biden halts new oil drilling on federal lands. Here’s what major climate move means for California

California welcomes Biden administration actions on climate change

On the same day the Biden Administration announced a series of actions on climate, California environmental officials convened hundreds of stakeholders to begin advancing Governor Gavin Newsom’s first-in-the-nation goal to protect 30 percent of the state’s land and coastal waters by 2030 to fight species loss and ecosystem destruction.  Last year, California joined a global effort than now includes more than 50 countries to protect 30 percent of our planet’s land and waters by 2030. Today’s announcement by President Biden means the United States is now added to the list as well.  “California has long taken on the mantle of global climate leadership advancing bold strategies to fight climate change – including committing to protect 30 percent of our land and coastal waters by 2030,” said Governor Newsom. “It’s great to have a partner in Washington, D.C. once again that listens to science and is ready to take on this existential threat and get to work to help slow and avert catastrophic climate change.” … ”  Continue reading this press release from the Natural Resources Agency here: California welcomes Biden administration actions on climate change

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In regional water news this week …

‘In every memory’: The Klamath River and the grassroots movement to save it

In late August in northern California as Berkshire Hathaway Energy and PacifiCorp executives made their way up the Klamath River by boat for a tour of the waters below their dams, local community members forced them to a stop with a blockade formed of their own canoes and boats. The confrontation was a long time coming.  “We kept up our end of the bargain to the detriment of our credibility in our communities,” said Chook-Chook Hillman, member of the Karuk tribe, to the executives in audio recorded by others in the blockade. He was referring to the deal struck 10 years before between the tribe and the energy companies to remove the dams, a deal that was in jeopardy. “Our kids have never known a dam-free river,” he added. … ” Continue reading at the Eureka Times-Standard here: ‘In every memory’: The Klamath River and the grassroots movement to save it

Voicing development fears, Trinidad council votes against water study

Citing risks of “overdevelopment,” the Trinidad City Council voted this week to deny the Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District’s request to participate in a feasibility study on extending water service from McKinleyville up to the Trinidad Rancheria.  Tuesday’s vote was 3-2, with councilmembers Richard Clompus and Dave Grover dissenting.  The water district approved a memorandum of understanding with the Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria during its Jan. 14 meeting initiating the feasibility study. The tribe made the request for water service from the district in November 2020 after the California Coastal Commission deemed the tribe’s water supply inadequate for the proposed multi-story Hyatt hotel at the Cher-Ae Heights Casino. … ”  Read more from the Eureka Times-Standard here:  Voicing development fears, Trinidad council votes against water study

New plan will reduce wildfire risk, improve forest health at Tahoe

2020 was a record wildfire year and as thick smoke filled the air throughout the summer as historic, destructive fires ran rampant in California.  Last year featured five of California’s six largest wildfires, and all were burning at the same time. More than four million acres burned across the state, which is double the previous record.  California’s Wildfire and Forest Resilience Action Plan was released on Jan. 8 to give a comprehensive and direct action plan for the state to reduce wildfire risk, improve the health of forests and wildlands along with battling climate change. … ”  Read more from the Tahoe Daily Tribune here:  New plan will reduce wildfire risk, improve forest health at Tahoe

Salmon count in Putah Creek drops from 2019, 2018

The official salmon count for Putah Creek revealed just 140 individuals for the winter run.  That was down from 550 reported last year and close to the same number the year before that, and is considerably lower than the peak of nearly 2,000 fish during the 2017 run.  One count put the number for the 2019 report at closer to 1,500 fish.  Rich Marovich, the streamkeeper for the Lower Putah Creek Coordinating Committee and the Solano County Water Agency, said the issue is when the fish are allowed into the creek. … ”  Read more from the Daily Republic here: Salmon count in Putah Creek drops from 2019, 2018

Protecting the natural wonders and resources of the Cosumnes River Watershed

The Sacramento Valley Conservancy’s land acquisition program continues to make progress towards several goals, despite the challenges created by the Covid-19 pandemic. Last April, Resources Legacy Fund’s Land-Sea Connection program awarded SVC, in partnership with the Cosumnes Coalition and the American River Conservancy, a grant to help fund a full-time Acquisition position to support an increased focus on land acquisition projects throughout the Cosumnes River watershed. This watershed is home to important natural resources and productive agricultural lands.  At the end of October 2020, SVC and Sacramento County Flood Control Agency (SAFCA) finalized the purchase of a 130-acre agricultural/grazing property located along the Cosumnes River where SVC holds a previously recorded (2018) Swainson’s hawk easement. … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Valley Conservancy here: Protecting the natural wonders and resources of the Cosumnes River Watershed

Feds ‘shortchange’ San Francisco Bay – local Congress members want money for restoration

San Francisco Bay is dwarfed by the Chesapeake Bay, Puget Sound and other treasured estuaries when it comes to federal funding, and California lawmakers want that changed.  On Thursday, a contingent of Bay Area members of Congress introduced legislation that would boost federal money tenfold for restoration of the region’s signature waters. Under the proposal, $50 million a year for five years would flow to bay projects that reduce water pollution, support wildlife, revive wetlands and protect shoreline communities from sea level rise. ... ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here: Feds ‘shortchange’ San Francisco Bay – local Congress members want money for restoration

Palo Alto: Going against the flow, City Council member draws rebukes for position on water plan

When Palo Alto officials adopted a position in 2018 in support of the Bay-Delta Plan, which aims to protect the Yosemite ecosystem by restricting how much water cities can draw from the San Joaquin River and its tributaries, they knew were swimming against the prevalent political tide.  Prompted by water conservationists and environmentalists, the City Council went against recommendations from the city’s Utilities Department staff and its water supplier, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which relies on the Tuolumne River for much of its water. It also defied the Bay Area Water Supply and Conservation Agency, a coalition of 27 municipal agencies that buy water from the SFPUC.  Now, the city’s appointee to BAWSCA, City Council member Alison Cormack, is drawing criticism from some of these same environmentalists after she took a stance that they say contradicts Palo Alto’s official position. ... ”  Read more from Palo Alto Online here:  Going against the flow, City Council member draws rebukes for position on water plan

Valley water directors move ahead with Pacheco Pass dam as price skyrockets

Valley Water leaders are moving forward with developing a new dam at Pacheco Pass in south Santa Clara County, despite recently learning that the price tag had doubled since 2019.  “It seems to me that the directors of the water district need to take every extreme measure we can find to continue this project, moving it forward and working with environmental groups as we always do,” said Santa Clara Valley Water District Director John Varela. “(We need to be) finding the solution, finding the resources to bring this to fruition and make it happen.” … ”  Read more from KTVU here:  Valley water directors move ahead with Pacheco Pass dam as price skyrockets

Judge voids Monterey County approval of Cal Am desal plant project

A Monterey County Superior Court judge has set aside the county’s approval of California American Water’s desalination plant project over its rationale for why the project’s benefits would outweigh environmental impacts in a lawsuit brought by the Marina Coast Water District.  At the same time, the judge rejected a bid by Marina Coast to require the county to conduct additional environmental review for the project as a result of new information and changed circumstances, and also dismissed Marina Coast’s contention that the county violated its own general plan, its desal public ownership requirement and its since expired moratorium on new wells with the approval. … ”  Read more from the Monterey Herald here:  Judge voids Monterey County approval of Cal Am desal plant project

The Monterey Peninsula’s water shortage could be solved with flow from the Salinas River. Why isn’t it?

In the driest years for Monterey County, the water available in the Salinas River is not enough to supply a single household. In the wettest year of the past three decades, 1995, there were 100,000 acre-feet of water available, more than the total urban usage in the county. Although the flow fluctuates wildly, the average amount is far more than what is needed, for example, for thirsty coastal cities desperate for housing.  The water has been available for decades – the right to use it is protected, encouraged and even required by state law – but it’s been flowing into the ocean, a casualty of Monterey County’s political deadlock. … ”  Read more from Monterey Weekly here: The Monterey Peninsula’s water shortage could be solved with flow from the Salinas River. Why isn’t it?

Delano’s “big dig”

The state’s new groundwater law has prompted a lot of dirt movement in the Central Valley.  The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act passed in 2014 mandates that overdrafted water basins get their aquifers in balance — don’t pump out more than goes back in — by 2040.  In order to get there without massive farmland fallowing, most valley water managers have been adding as many acres of recharge ground as possible. … ”  Read more from SJV Water here: Delano’s “big dig”

Army Corps allocates $1.5 million to Encinitas-Solana Beach sand project

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will allocate an additional $1.5 million for the planning, engineering and design of a federal sand project expected to beef up beaches in Encinitas and Solana Beach for the next 50 years, Rep. Mike Levin, D-San Juan Capistrano, announced Friday.  The Encinitas-Solana Beach Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project was authorized in 2016 to stabilize the eroding bluffs against high-energy storm swells and rising sea levels. … ”  Read more from the San Diego Union-Tribune here: Army Corps allocates $1.5 million to Encinitas-Solana Beach sand project

San Diego: New reservoir to protect local drinking water deliveries in North County

A major construction project to improve drinking water supply reliability in North San Diego County will start in February after the San Diego County Water Authority’s Board of Directors today approved an $11.4 million contract for the work to Pacific Hydrotech Corporation of Perris, Calif.  The Hauck Mesa Storage Reservoir project includes demolition of an abandoned steel tank, building a 2.1 million-gallon storage reservoir connected to the Valley Center Pipeline, and construction of an isolation vault and an underground flow control facility. The project is expected to be completed by winter 2022. … ”  Read more from the Water News Network here: New reservoir to protect local drinking water deliveries in North County

San Diego water managers push for state relief

San Diego County water managers are lobbying state officials to help get financial relief for customers and water agencies struggling with water debt during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The region’s water wholesaler was surprised by the amount of debt looming over water customers and the agencies that sell it.  State water officials estimate 1.6 million customers are behind on their water bills. The debt is worth more than $1 billion. ... ”  Read more from KPBS here: San Diego water managers push for state relief

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Along the Colorado River …

Record low Lake Powell and bad 2021 drought forecast sets stage for water cuts

The dry 2020 and the lack of snow this season has water managers in seven states preparing for the first time for cutbacks outlined in drought contingency plans drafted two years ago.  A sobering forecast released this week by the Bureau of Reclamation shows the federally owned Lake Mead and Lake Powell — the nation’s two largest reservoirs and critical storage for Colorado River water and its 40 million users — dipping near-record-low levels. If those levels continue dropping as expected, long-negotiated agreements reached by the seven Colorado River Basin states in 2019 will go into effect, with water deliveries curtailed to prevent the federal government from stepping in and making hard water cuts. … ”  Read more from the Colorado Sun here: Record low Lake Powell and bad 2021 drought forecast sets stage for water cuts

Colorado’s ornery, independent water guardians finally agree on one thing: Wall Street can look elsewhere

The calls came in shortly after the story in The New York Times announced Wall Street was on the prowl for “billions in the Colorado’s water.”  “Can you help us? How do we get started?” wondered the New York financiers, pals of Andy Mueller, the manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District.  “My response was really that if you want to invest in Colorado, you might want to look at something other than water,” Mueller said. “There is nothing to see here.”  The national story raised hackles across Colorado. … ”  Read more from the Colorado Sun here:  Colorado’s ornery, independent water guardians finally agree on one thing: Wall Street can look elsewhere

In national water news this week …

Forever chemicals are widespread in U.S. drinking water

Many Americans fill up a glass of water from their faucet without worrying whether it might be dangerous. But the crisis of lead-tainted water in Flint, Mich., showed that safe, potable tap water is not a given in this country. Now a study from the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit advocacy organization, reveals a widespread problem: the drinking water of a majority of Americans likely contains “forever chemicals.” These compounds may take hundreds, or even thousands, of years to break down in the environment. They can also persist in the human body, potentially causing health problems. … ”  Read more from Scientific American here: Forever chemicals are widespread in U.S. drinking water

Biden swings waters pendulum with final resolution still elusive

The Biden administration is swinging the pendulum of repeated changes to water regulation back to expanding after those regulatory powers contracted under President Donald Trump.  But the swing isn’t likely to be permanent, legal scholars say.  The expansion of regulation has turned the question of federal jurisdiction over waters of the U.S., or WOTUS, affects how private property is developed, from an arcane rule into a facet of America’s culture wars. Trump claimed—inaccurately, his critics said—that WOTUS “gave bureaucrats virtually unlimited authority” and “basically took your property away from you.” … ”  Read more from Bloomberg Law here: Biden swings waters pendulum with final resolution still elusive

Biden targets Trump deregulation of ag

The ushering in of the Trump administration back in 2017 launched large-scale deregulation at the federal level, including agriculture.  Just a week in office, President Joe Biden already has announced a review of a number of federal regulations, including Trump’s Navigable Waters Protection Rule, changes made to the Endangered Species Act, National Ambient Air Quality standards for particulate matter, Agricultural Worker Protection Standard, and action to keep chlorpyrifos-based pesticides on the market despite pushback from environmentalists.  In an executive order signed Wednesday to deal with climate change, the White House noted that among the first actions Biden took in office was an “immediate review of harmful rollbacks of standards that protect our air, water and communities.” ... ”  Read more from Progressive Farmer here: Biden targets Trump deregulation of ag

DOI FACT SHEET: President Biden to take action to uphold commitment to restore balance on public lands and waters, invest in clean energy future

President Joe Biden will sign an Executive Order today that will help restore balance on public lands and waters, create jobs, and provide a path to align the management of America’s public lands and waters with our nation’s climate, conservation, and clean energy goals.  In implementing the Executive Order, the Department of the Interior will engage diverse stakeholders across the country, as well as conduct formal consultation with Tribes in recognition of the U.S. government’s trust responsibilities. … ”  Read more from the Department of Interior here: President Biden to take action to uphold commitment to restore balance on public lands and waters, invest in clean energy future

Weekly features …


BLOG ROUND-UP: Sac Valley water managers prepare for a dry year; A Swiss cheese model for fish conservation in California; A tale of two movies: Brave Blue World and Dark Waters; and more …

Click here to read the blog round-up.


SCIENCE NEWS: Eyes reveal life history of fish; California salmon deaths traced to thiamine deficiency; Corralling steelhead at the Carmel River Weir; Climate change will alter the position of the Earth’s tropical rain belt; and more …

Click here to read this edition of Science News.

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Announcements, notices, and funding opportunities …

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: 2021 Wetland Conservation Easement Applications Due February 26

WATER PLAN eNEWS: ~~Lunch-MAR~ Delta Assessment~ Storage Projects~ Grants Awarded~ Water Partnerships~ Ecological Drought~ Irrigation Conference~~

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ Steelhead Workshop~ Vaccine Access~ Building Sustainability~ Delta Voice ~~

SAN JOAQUIN RIVER RESTORATION PROGRAM: Initial 2021 Restoration Allocation & Default Flow Schedule Released

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