Bruce Babbitt’s California grand water bargain is a selfie to seek federal appointment

Wayne Lusvardi writes, “Bruce Babbitt, former Secretary of the Interior under Pres. Bill Clinton, is calling for a “Grand Water Bargain” for California as he did in 1994 when he was formerly Secretary of the Interior under Pres. Bill Clinton. Babbitt was the advocate of the failed 1994 Cal-Fed Bay-Delta Accord when Republican Pete Wilson was governor.  But Babbitt’s unsolicited proposal is not grand because he leaves out the Trump administration as well as environmentalists who have obstructed nearly every water storage project in the last 50 years. This gives rise to speculation that he is using his proposal to primp for a position in any future Biden-Harris administration. ”  Read more from the California Globe here:  Bruce Babbitt’s California grand water bargain is a selfie to seek federal appointment

San Diego’s puzzling pursuit of a big new pipeline to the Colorado River

John Fleck writes, “I’m puzzling over the San Diego County Water Authority’s pursuit of a new Colorado River pipeline.  I’ve been puzzling for a while, given that it would be really expensive and that a really big pipe (aqueduct) already exists to carry the water to San Diego. My puzzlement was goosed by a report that surfaced last week at a board meeting of one of its member agencies suggesting that the general managers of agencies representing the majority of the Water Authority’s actual water-using member agencies don’t seem to want it. … ”  Read more from the Inkstain blog here:  San Diego’s puzzling pursuit of a big new pipeline to the Colorado River

A new way forward for our environment and water management in the upper Sacramento River

Thad Bettner writes, “[Last week] the water suppliers and landowners along the Sacramento River joined with federal and state agencies in a new science collaborative designed to inform ongoing efforts to improve conditions for salmon on the Sacramento River, while also helping better manage water for cities and rural communities, farms, refuges and wildlife management areas that depend upon this water.  The Sacramento River Science Partnership (Partnership) establishes a science collaborative in which members will develop, share and discuss science to inform water management activities and protection of fish in the mainstem Sacramento River. … ”  Read more from the Northern California Water Association blog here:  A new way forward for our environment and water management in the upper Sacramento River

Water a public resource: how privatization happens

Demitri Fierro writes, “Sometimes community health itself can be used as an excuse to pursue corporate dollars…  When it comes to public health, one easily believes that community wellness takes priority over anything else. However, as we have covered in previous publications, that does not always hold true. As more officials in the public sector are being forced into transparency from ongoing scrutiny, we continue to see motivations behind their actions as self-serving. What happens when exploitation of public utilities is labeled as the “best interest” for the city? The City of Montebello is still attempting to answer that question. … ”  Read more from the Sierra Club here:  Water a public resource: how privatization happens

California-Chile water nexus 2: Water-smart agriculture

Agriculture is a powerhouse of an economic sector in both Chile and California, in terms of what it produces as well as consumes. In Chile, it amounts to 18.5 percent of Chilean exports and makes up nearly 85 percent of all water rights granted nationwide. In California, nearly 80 percent of human water use is geared towards agriculture, supplying the United States with over 30 percent of its vegetables and 66 percent of its fruits and nuts. The state also accounts for over 13 percent of the country’s agricultural value.  Unfortunately, the agriculture sector in both places is consuming water at an unsustainable rate given its dependence on greater quantities than what nature provides in the form of snow melt, groundwater aquifers, and precipitation. … ”  Read more from the NRDC here:  California-Chile water nexus 2: Water-smart agriculture

Losing mussel mass – the silent extinction of freshwater mussels

Andrew Rypel writes, “Throughout my career I’ve spent some time studying the fascinating ecology and conservation issues of freshwater mussels. For me, learning about mussels has fortified a recurring theme of the natural world – that everything is connected and that small changes in one part of a system can yield unexpected changes elsewhere, often many years later. More importantly, freshwater mussels are essentially threatened everywhere. And because we don’t often hear about them, it is hard to save them, because public will is so critical to generating change. … ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here: Losing mussel mass – the silent extinction of freshwater mussels

Photo credit:  Bodie, by Rennett Stowe

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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