MWD and Valley Water have yet to commit funds for Delta tunnel design:  Deirdre Des Jardins writes, “Metropolitan Water District has two seats on the Board of the Delta Conveyance Design and Construction Authority (DCA), and Valley Water (formerly Santa Clara Valley Water District) has one seat. But to date, neither agency has committed to pay the DCA’s costs for the planning and engineering design for the single tunnel.  After the Department of Water Resources rescinded all approvals of the project on May 2, 2019, DWR gave the DCA a loan of $19.7 million, which allowed the DCA to continue engineering work on the project. ... ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: MWD and Valley Water have yet to commit funds for Delta tunnel design

Reaction to CalMatters essay, “A social justice perspective of the Delta tunnel project”:  “Gary Kremen, vice chair of the Delta Conveyance Finance Authority, argues that building the Delta conveyance tunnel promotes social justice.  His argument is built around a rhetorical question that he fails to answer correctly. Kremen asks, In a catastrophic levee failure, who stands to be hurt the most?  Correct Answer:  The people who die!  Shockingly, Mr. Kremen completely omits any mention of fatalities, which is rather obviously the most significant harm caused by the catastrophic flood he describes. ... ” Continue reading at the Valley Economy blog here: Reaction to CalMatters essay, “A social justice perspective of the Delta tunnel project”

Delta Flows: California water during national crisis:  Barbara Barrigan-Parilla writes, “Last week, the number one box office hit was in the USA was “Jurassic Park” because drive-ins were the only theaters open during the pandemic. Jurassic Park contains some great science quotes that can be applied to efforts by the State Water Contractors, the Design Construction Authority, the Department of Water Resources and the Newsom Administration around the pursuit of a Delta tunnel and overall California water management.  “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.” ... ”  Read more from Restore the Delta here: Delta Flows: California water during national crisis

Dairy’s shrinking water footprint: a key piece of the SGMA puzzle:  “The implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) and other anticipated water restrictions pose major challenges for California agriculture. Without effective solutions, economists have estimated that up to one million acres of farmland will be fallowed, resulting in a revenue loss of $7.2 billion per year. As the state’s top agricultural commodity, dairy farming is an important part of the SGMA challenge. Fortunately, dairy farmers have an excellent track record for water savings and are continuing to adopt innovative strategies to advance environmental sustainability and help meet the water conservation challenges ahead. … ”  Read more from Water Wrights here: Dairy’s shrinking water footprint: a key piece of the SGMA puzzle

Delta Smelt Sanctuary – Deepwater Ship Channel:  Tom Cannon writes, “In a March 2020 post, I described where the remnants of the endangered Delta smelt population spawn and rear in the Sacramento Deepwater Ship Channel (Ship Channel) in the north Delta (Figure 1). In this post, I describe how the rearing conditions in the Ship Channel are poor. This can be seen by comparing habitat conditions in the Ship Channel with those in the lower Sacramento River channel at Freeport several miles to the east in late spring 2020. ... ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here: Delta Smelt Sanctuary – Deepwater Ship Channel

California Appellate Court upholds Water Board’s broad drought response authority:  Richard Frank writes,California’s Court of Appeal for the Third Appellate District recently upheld the State Water Resources Control Board’s temporary emergency drought response regulations–enacted in 2014-15–as well as related curtailment orders the Board issued to specific water users to implement those regulations.  In doing so, the Water Board rejected a legal challenge agricultural water users brought against the Board seeking to elevate private water rights over other interests–like protection of environmental values–the Board is obligated under California law to consider in its water rights decisions.  The Court of Appeal’s decision in Stanford Vina Ranch Irrigation Company v. State of California represents an important vindication of the Water Board’s broad authority to take emergency action limiting the exercise of private water rights when compelling and urgent circumstances such as severe drought require. ... ”  Read more from the Legal Planet here: California Appellate Court upholds Water Board’s broad drought response authority

Congress is advancing bipartisan climate resilience policies in 3 key ways:  Mark Rupp writes, “Congressional leaders across both parties are taking action to build climate resilience, and for good reason.  Natural disasters and extreme weather know no political affiliations or geographic boundaries, and are impacting all Americans with greater severity. Our country desperately needs investments in infrastructure that can withstand these disasters, while also increasing public safety, lowering the cost of disaster recovery, and spurring job and economic growth. … ”  Read more from the Growing Returns blog here:  Congress is advancing bipartisan climate resilience policies in 3 key ways

House climate plan offers bold vision for the future

SEE ALSO: Three Key Takeaways from House Climate Crisis Action Plan, at the NRDC

Federal rules discourage cleanup of abandoned mines::  Jonathan Wood writes, “Throughout the West, abandoned mines release toxic pollutants, harming water quality, fish, and recreation opportunities. The private sector has long expressed interest in cleaning up these mines, but federal regulations make such projects too risky by imposing unlimited liability on anyone who touches an abandoned mine—even to reduce pollution.  This is no theoretical concern. Consider Midas Gold’s proposal to restore parts of the Payette and Boise National Forests, which were heavily mined in the early 20th century, in exchange for the right to mine the area for the next 20 years. ... ”  Read more from PERC here: Federal rules discourage cleanup of abandoned mines

 

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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