What We're Fighting! While farmers might not have the resources to fight the state, the federal government certainly does. And, it's a good thing.  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “Our Central Valley has been fighting the State of California for a long time.  There was a time when farmers couldn't imagine that they'd have to fight for water, but the sad reality of it is here for sure.  Farmers were never built to put up the legal resources necessary to win these battles while environmental groups used the emotion of environmentalism to raise money, hire attorneys and elect pro-policy legislators to enact their agenda.   That's why farmers were so enthusiastic to hear candidate Donald Trump say he would fight for water. ... ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here: What We’re Fighting! While farmers might not have the resources to fight the state, the federal government certainly does. And, it’s a good thing.

On the Public Record writes limericks on the voluntary agreements.  How can I excerpt that?  You'll have to go read it here: Variations on a theme

An Introduction to State Water Project Deliveries:  “Most people in California receive some of their drinking water supply from the State Water Project (SWP). The SWP also supplies water to over 10% of California’s irrigated agriculture.  The SWP and its service area span much of California, delivering water to 29 wholesale contractors shown in Figure 1.  Each year, the Department of Water Resources announces SWP Table A allocations which inform water contractors’ SWP deliveries: “Table A”, “Carryover”, and “Article 21.”  What are these different SWP delivery categories and how do they work? … ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here: An Introduction to State Water Project Deliveries

California should lead the nation in controlling agricultural pollution: Helen Kang and Deborah Sivas write, “Agricultural runoff is one of the largest sources of pollution in the nation’s waterways. In recent years, scientific journals and the media have been filled with reports of toxic algae blooms and dead zones near and far: The Everglades, Great Lakes, Gulf of Mexico, Chesapeake Bay, and San Francisco Bay-Delta. Agricultural pollution also threatens public health in communities that rely on tainted groundwater. In California alone, more than a quarter million residents in largely agricultural areas are served by water systems with degraded groundwater quality. … ”  Read more from Legal Planet here:  California should lead the nation in controlling agricultural pollution

Water Management Investments in the North State to Improve the Environment in Northern California:  The Northern California Water Association blog writes, “Water suppliers in the rural and urban parts of the Sacramento River Basin are unified through the North State Water Alliance (Alliance) to make Water Management Investments to Improve the Environment in Northern California for future generations.  The Alliance is working together to advance natural infrastructure in every part of the system—healthy headwaters, reactivated floodplains, and expanded utilization of groundwater storage—and 21st century investments like Sites Reservoir to enhance climate resiliency throughout the Sacramento River Basin and prepare the region for floods, fires and drought. ... ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here: Water Management Investments in the North State to Improve the Environment in Northern California

2020 is a dry year on the Colorado River. What happens next year will be more important:  Eric Kuhn writes, “This winter’s decent snowfall has turned into an abysmal runoff on the Colorado River, thanks to the dry soils heading into the winter, along with a warm spring. It’s alarming, but given the large amount of storage capacity in the basin and the recent string of good runoff years in the upper Basin, with five of the last six years close to average or better, most of the basin’s water users will not face significant problems this year. Our bigger concern is what happens next year. Are we headed for a multi-year drought? … ”  Read more from the Inkstain blog here: 2020 is a dry year on the Colorado River. What happens next year will be more important:

 

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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