On the Public Record is hearing the Voluntary Agreements are over.  OtPR writes, “Rumor has it that the lawsuits caused by the discrepancy between the Trump Biological Opinion and the State’s Incidental Take Permit have killed the Voluntary Agreements. If so, there are some lessons to be learned; let’s spell those out. ... ”  Read more from On the Public Record here:  I am hearing that the Voluntary Agreements are over.

What to do?  Newsom administration can pivot to water environmentalism, suggests On the Public Record:  “With the Voluntary Agreements no longer at stake and the entire ascientific worldview discredited, this is the perfect time for the Newsom administration to pivot to a strongly environmental water policy. It will fit more harmoniously with a progressive administration. Next year is likely to bring willing federal partners. The Newsom administration could be remembered for restoring rivers, for giving people access to clean cold rushing water, for reorienting to climate mitigation and adaptation. If the Newsom administration decides to do this, here are some things they could do ... ”  Continue reading at On the Public Record here: Newsom administration can pivot to water environmentalism

Delta tunnel: DCA transmitted initial project “footprint” to DWR on April 1:  Deirdre Des Jardins writes, “According to an April 23, 2020 memo prepared by the Kern County Water Agency for their April Board meeting packet, the Delta Conveyance Design and Construction Authority “…delivered its “footprint” engineering to DWR on April 1, 2020. The “footprint” engineering serves as the starting point for the environmental analysis necessary for the EIR.”  According to a timeline in the Kern County Water Agency memo, the Department of Water Resources was going to produce cost estimates for the Delta tunnel project by the end of April.  ... ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: Delta tunnel: DCA transmitted initial project “footprint” to DWR on April 1

Adult winter-run salmon migration in jeopardy under new biological opinion:  Tom Cannon writes, “As we enter May 2020, winter-run Chinook salmon are in the middle period of their near 300-mile adult migration up the Sacramento River to spawning grounds below Shasta Dam near Redding, CA. These adult salmon are in jeopardy this spring from low flows and high water temperatures in the lower Sacramento River. The new federal biological opinion on the long term operation (BO-LTO) of federal Central Valley Project (CVP) and State Water Project (SWP) that went into effect in October 2019 is not protecting these migrating adult winter-run. ... ”  Read more from the Cal Fisheries blog here: Adult winter-run salmon migration in jeopardy under new biological opinion

Protecting California’s aquatic biodiversity in a time of crisis:  Peter Moyle, Jeanette Howard, and Ted Grantham write, “Weeks of being confined indoors under shelter-in-place orders increases our appreciation of the natural world. Walking and exercising outdoors, especially along a local stream like Putah Creek, is one of the best ways to escape the news cycle and to restore a sense of well-being.  Quiet streets and pathways have invited a growing chorus of bird song and can even inspire  interest in watching hatches of mayflies rising off gurgling stream waters. Online livestreaming of  wildlife cameras has surged. These experiences remind us how California’s natural environments and rich biological diversity improve the quality of our lives.  They also remind us that this natural heritage is threatened. California harbors more unique plants and animals than other state in the U.S but an estimated 30 percent of our native species are now threatened with extinction (Mooney and Zavaleta 2016). ... ”  Continue reading at the California Water Blog here:  Protecting California’s aquatic biodiversity in a time of crisis

Franks Tract – smelt trap:  Tom Cannon writes, “In a May 2019 post, I described the central Delta as a salmon trap for juvenile salmon. This post describes the “smelt trap.”  Franks Tract in the central Delta is a longfin and Delta smelt trap.  Longfin smelt were vulnerable to the trap in March 2020 .  Flow was reversed in False River because of south Delta exports.  It’s not just the net flow that makes Franks Tract a smelt trap.   It is also tidal pumping of 50,000 cfs in-and-out.  What goes into Franks Tract on the flood tide does not come back out the same.  … ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here:  Franks Tract – smelt trap

What it would mean to be serious about food security.  On the Public Record writes, “All the ag people sent a letter to Newsom saying, hey, it is a plague and there’s drought, so how about you give us all the water because food security. Also pay for the canals we broke by overpumping, pay for our on-farm irrigation efficiency and build more dams. Because we’re growing FOOOoooooOOOOODDDDD don’t you like to eat or are you just gonna let everyone STARVE during A PLAGUE? ... ”  Read more from On the Public Record here: What it would mean to be serious about food security.

New programs to address nitrates and ensure safe drinking water: what does CV-Salts mean to the Sacramento Valley?  The Northern California Water Association writes, “As part of the State of California’s efforts to ensure safe drinking water, the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board will begin to implement the CV-SALTS program this summer by sending Notices to Comply (Notices) to various dischargers in parts of the San Joaquin Valley, including owners and operators of irrigated crop land, dairies, ranchers, poultry producers, food processors, wineries and municipalities in the Kaweah, Turlock, Chowchilla, Tule, Modesto and Kings sub-basins (shown in red on map). The Notices will require Nitrate Control Programs as part of the recently adopted CV-SALTS program to address historical nitrate problems through either 1) an individual permit or 2) by joining a Management Zone.  ... ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here:  New programs to address nitrates and ensure safe drinking water: what does CV-Salts mean to the Sacramento Valley?

Brent Hastey: Son of a rancher’s daughter: The Northern California Water Association writes, “A trail of dust swirled behind the ‘57 Chevy pickup as it barreled down the path in an attempt to keep the herd in the pasture.  Not one’s typical choice to prevent the cattle from veering off course, but when you’re nine months pregnant, it is a bit easier to maneuver when you have a 160 horsepower, V8 engine on your side.  As a cattle rancher’s daughter, June did whatever was needed at the time to get the job done in the most effective way. A trait that she would pass on to the child that would be born later that day.  Brent Hastey grew up on that very same ranch in Yuba County, but he wouldn’t follow in the tire tracks of his mother. … ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here: Son of a rancher’s daughter

Feature photo credit: Hope, by Miwok via Flickr

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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