Delta tunnel: DCA staff downplay opposition to stakeholder engagement process continuing during pandemic:  Dierdre Des Jardins writes, “Under the supervision of the Department of Water Resources’, the Delta Conveyance Design and Construction Authority has been conducting outreach to Delta stakeholders on the engineering design for the Delta tunnel.  In November 2019, the DCA appointed 16 Delta stakeholders to a “Delta Stakeholder Engagement Committee.” The members represented a broad range of Delta interests, from Delta businesses to sportfishing, recreation, environmental justice, an aquatic and terrestrial NGOs. ... ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: Delta tunnel: DCA staff downplay opposition to stakeholder engagement process continuing during pandemic

Striped Bass in the Pacific Ocean: When, where and why?  Dylan K. Stompe writes, “Striped bass are an iconic and recreationally important fish species throughout the United States, including within their native range on the Atlantic Coast. Based on their value as a sport fish and as table fare, striped bass were one of the early introductions to the San Francisco Estuary (SFE). Their life-history and abundance within the SFE has been studied as much or more than any other fish present in the system, with only Chinook salmon, and more recently Delta smelt, approaching the same level of interest. Given the historical resources dedicated to monitoring and studying striped bass in the SFE, the question must be asked; why don’t we know more about what they’re doing in the Pacific Ocean? ... ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here: Striped Bass in the Pacific Ocean: When, where and why?

Pacific Herring – February 2020: Tom Cannon writes, “An article in San Francisco Estuary Magazine, “Where have all the Herring Gone?,” sums up the status of the San Francisco Bay’s Pacific herring population.  In my last post on the herring, May 2018, I described recent population trends indicating a continuing long-term decline in reproduction in the Bay estuary and a withering away of the herring commercial fishery in the Bay.  … ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here: Pacific Herring – February 2020

A low snowpack makes it imperative to better manage groundwater supplies. Here’s how:  Maurice Hall writes, “Despite the much-needed April showers we saw this week, our normally wet January and February were bone dry in most of California. So it came as little surprise when the annual April 1 snowpack measurement in the Sierras came in low, at about 53% of average statewide. It’s another important reminder of how California’s weather, and consequently our water supplies, are swinging to greater extremes.  The low snowpack and extreme weather it signals make it more imperative than ever to carefully manage another part of our water system: underground water supplies. ... ”  Read more from the Environmental Defense Fund here: A low snowpack makes it imperative to better manage groundwater supplies. Here’s how

Too big to dream? A landscape scale approach to re-envision our floodplains in the Sacramento Valley for multiple benefits:  “How critical are Sacramento Valley floodplains for a vibrant fishery?  A California Fish and Game Bulletin from 1930 gives us a clue. The report documents the Sacramento River commercial salmon catch declining from 6 million pounds in 1918 to less than 1 million pounds by 1927. The timeframe of the report may be the key to the answer because many of the usual suspects that people point to as the cause of the salmon declines had not yet arrived on the scene–invasive species, large rim dams, and Delta water export facilities wouldn’t be introduced into the system until years later. … ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here: Too big to dream? A landscape scale approach to re-envision our floodplains in the Sacramento Valley for multiple benefits

Stormwater capture is undervalued in California:  Sarah Diringer writes, “The rain barrels at my house are full – 110 gallons of rain stored to water the garden when we enter the dry season. And, this is only a small fraction of the stormwater being stored throughout California and the western U.S. Across the region, communities, water agencies, and others are catching millions of gallons of  stormwater to store for the drier months.  Stormwater is the rain and other water that runs off of streets and sidewalks into nearby gutters or waterways. Communities throughout the western U.S. are expanding efforts to collect this valuable water resource … ”  Read more from the Pacific Institute here: Stormwater capture is undervalued in California

Water and COVID-19: An early overview from California:  Faith Kearns writes, “The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, is affecting people across the globe, in states and cities, in our backyards, and our own living spaces. Unlike many other kinds of disasters, which are relatively geographically and temporally limited, this one is hitting many millions of people around the world at essentially the same time. However, the experience of COVID-19 is not the same for everyone – it varies by many of the same factors that affect other disaster and public health outcomes including race, income, employment type and status, household responsibilities, and housing status. … ”  Read more from the Confluence blog here: Water and COVID-19: An early overview from California

Food waste in the time of COVID-19: The real reason to cry over spilt milk:  Dipika Kadaba writes, “Earlier this month Wisconsin journalist Shaun Gallagher shared a shocking video of dairy farmers dumping tens of thousands of gallons of milk down the drain as the industry faced reported strains from the COVID-19 pandemic.  “What a waste!” Gallagher wrote in a widely shared tweet. “#COVID19Pandemic is forcing dairy farmers to dump their milk down the drain so the milk market doesn’t implode. Why not give it away to those who need it?” ... ”  Read more from the Revelator here: Food waste in the time of COVID-19: The real reason to cry over spilt milk

Federal rules discourage cleanup of abandoned mines:  Jonathan Wood writes, “Throughout the West, abandoned mines release toxic pollutants, harming water quality, fish, and recreation opportunities. The private sector has long expressed interest in cleaning up these mines, but federal regulations make such projects too risky by imposing unlimited liability on anyone who touches an abandoned mine—even to reduce pollution.  This is no theoretical concern. Consider Midas Gold’s proposal to restore areas of the Payette and Boise National Forests heavily mined in the early 20th century, in exchange for the right to mine the area for 20 years. … ”  Read more from PERC here: Federal rules discourage cleanup of abandoned mines

Photo credit: Bridge over creek in the Eastern Sierra; Photo by Jeff Sullivan via Flickr.

 

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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