The single delta tunnel is still bad for people, fish and the ecosystem:  Dan Bacher writes, “This great map graphic shows how the “new” Single Tunnel Plan that would be constructed under the Delta “is the same as the old plan. And what is different (not much),” according to Jan McCleery, past president of the Save the California Delta Alliance (STCDA).  “The only difference is a possible new Eastern route which goes a bit more around-the-Delta than through it. But other than a swath of purple on a map, there are no details yet about construction impacts with an Eastern tunnel route,” she said. ... ”  Read more from the Daily Kos here:  The Single Delta Tunnel Is Still Bad for People, Fish and the Ecosystem

It's Tough Enough!!  We shouldn't have to fight our own local congressmen to get more water for our Valley. But we do.  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “It's tough enough for farms and cities in the San Joaquin Valley to fight the politicians in San Francisco, the entrenched water bureaucracy, the State Water Resources Control Board, the NRDC and the Sierra Club…but we shouldn't have to fight our own local congressmen to get more water for our Valley.  But we do.  Apparently, local Congressmen Jim Costa and TJ Cox feel compelled to fight Donald Trump even if he's fighting to get us more water. … ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here: It’s Tough Enough!!  We shouldn’t have to fight our own local congressmen to get more water for our Valley. But we do.

Delta Voluntary Agreement costs soar from $1.1 billion to $5.3 billion:  Jeff Michael writes, “The first update of the Delta voluntary settlement agreements (VSA) last winter had an estimated cost of $1.1 billion over 15 years.  In the latest update, the cost of implementing the voluntary agreements has soared by over $4 billion to a whopping $5.3 billion.  Governor Newsom failed to mention the enormous and growing costs in his oped praising the voluntary agreement framework. … ”  Read more from the Valley Economy blog here:  Delta Voluntary Agreement costs soar from $1.1 billion to $5.3 billion

Trump is coming; Trump is going.  On the Public Record writes, “Trump is coming back next week to talk about CA water. I swear, I’d pay each of you reporters TEN CASH DOLLARS if you skipped writing the explainers afterwards about why Trump didn’t make any sense. We know he isn’t going to make sense. He’s going to come here and garble something about how he engorged the water like no one has ever seen and he’s built sixty-seven new pumps, the best pumps, the most beautiful pumps and completely demolished the stupid little fish with his new Biographical Opinions(because he says the quiet parts loud). Fine. We know this. Trump is going to Trump. … ”  Read more from On The Public Record here: Trump is coming; Trump is going.

Trump will visit San Joaquin Valley to sign salmon-killing water plan:  Dan Bacher writes, ““While Trump is in California talking about plans to destroy our rivers and salmon runs, Gavin Newsom’s Resource Secretary Wade Crowfoot will be in Sacramento discussing water issues and cutting ‘green tape,” said Regina Chichizola, co-director of Save California Salmon. “Gavin Newsom has only not come through on his promise to fight Trump on water, he is actively negotiating with him, and has started prioritizing new dams and diversions above restoration.” … ”  Read more from IndyBay here: Trump will visit San Joaquin Valley to sign salmon-killing water plan

Preserving and restoring wild salmon populations while sustaining commercial and sport fisheries with hatcheries:  Tom Cannon writes, “Hatcheries bypass the high mortality life-history phases of wild salmon populations. As a result, hatcheries contribute far greater salmon smolt production to the ocean per number of eggs than do wild populations. Without hatcheries, the replacement rate of Central Valley salmon populations would be less than 1-to-1, and the populations would move toward extinction. Without hatcheries, there would be no commercial or sport salmon fisheries in California today.  But hatcheries bring many real problems for wild salmon. … ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here: Preserving and restoring wild salmon populations while sustaining commercial and sport fisheries with hatcheries

Sacramento Valley growers work to protect aquatic life:  The Northern California Water Association writes, “Recent water quality monitoring testing conducted for the Sacramento Valley Water Quality Coalition (Coalition) shows that water quality in the Sacramento Valley is good and particularly healthy for the aquatic ecosystem. Aquatic health and the biological condition of waterbodies is generally measured by toxicity testing using sensitive algae, invertebrates, and fish that are intended to be protective of resident species. Toxicity tests performed by certified laboratories are used in the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board’s regulatory programs as a tool to evaluate potential effects on aquatic life beneficial uses under the Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act. … ”  Read more from the NorCal Water Association blog here: Sacramento Valley growers work to protect aquatic life

More water will not bring salt-impaired land in the San Joaquin Valley back into production:  Deirdre Des Jardins writes, “President Trump is going to visit the San Joaquin Valley this week, and is likely to announce approval of plans to dramatically increase federal exports of water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to the San Joaquin Valley.  Experts have predicted that the increased Delta pumping will have catastrophic impacts on endangered fish in the Delta and migrating salmon, as well as worsening Delta water quality.  While the gutting of Endangered Species Act restrictions on Delta pumping will help industrial growers on the West side of the San Joaquin Valley, it is not likely to help impoverished local communities such as Huron and Mendota, which have been impacted by large scale land fallowing due to soil and groundwater salinization. … ”  Read more from the California Water Research blog here: More water will not bring salt-impaired land in the San Joaquin Valley back into production

Levels of uncertainty on the Colorado River:  John Fleck writes, “One of the great lessons of the last two decades on the Colorado River is the futility of the “search for certainty”. No one number for “the flow of the Colorado River” can allow us to plan for the future. We face the formidable task of building a river new management framework that is robust to the challenges of deep uncertainty.  Jian Wang, David Rosenberg, and colleagues at Utah State’s Center for Colorado River Studies have a valuable new paper that provides a helpful framework for the task. ... ”  Read more from the Inkstain Blog here: Levels of uncertainty on the Colorado River

Field courses help young people see the real world: Andrew L. Rypel writes, “It was perhaps unsurprising I wound up a field ecologist. Raised in Wisconsin, I spent almost all my childhood free time roaming largely unchaperoned in nature, pre-internet. It was there that I developed a deep love for nature, water and fish that would stay with me my whole life. It was a privileged upbringing. And yet somehow it was years later, when I was 22 and taking a university field course, that I finally figured out I wanted to pursue an academic career in fish and ecology. It’s unclear how many biologists can trace their paths back to experiences like these, but I suspect there are many. Field courses are so impactful, and we need them now, more than ever before. ... ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here:  Field courses help young people see the real world

One year into Trump’s PFAS action plan, few signs of progress:  “Friday marks one year since the Environmental Protection Agency unveiled its latest plan to address the crisis of the toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS, which have likely contaminated a majority of drinking water supplies nationwide. But President Trump’s so-called action plan has met few of the milestones parents expect from a one-year-old. … ”  Read more from the Environmental Working Group here: One year into Trump’s PFAS action plan, few signs of progress

Trump budget proposal reveals regressive environmental priorities:   John Platt writes, “President Donald Trump has unveiled his budget proposal for the next federal fiscal year, and it’s predictably harsh for wildlife and the environment — but great for oil, gas and coal.  Of course, the annual presidential budget is more spectacle than anything else. The real budget each year comes from Congress, which may or may not take up the president’s suggestions.  But whether White House budget proposal’s recommendations go any further, it reveals the dark truth about the Trump administration’s priorities, especially as they relate to environmental issues. … ”  Read more from The Revelator here: Trump budget proposal reveals regressive environmental priorities  

Featured image credit: Venice (California) canal, photo by Melanie K. Reed via Flickr

About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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