DAILY DIGEST: California agriculture in 2050 – where we are headed and why; Farming in the age of climate change; Valley residents sign on to Newsom recall effort; Managing flood water for aquifer recharge: Economic considerations for policy; Satellite image of the ‘bomb cyclone’; and more …

In California water news today, California agriculture in 2050 – where we are headed and why; Farming in the age of climate change; Valley residents sign on to Newsom recall effort; Managing flood water for aquifer recharge: Economic considerations for policy; Delta: Using DNA to map out the food that keep fish alive; The sea wanted to take this California lighthouse. Now, it’s part of a conflict between a town and two tribes; Essay: ‘Brown water for brown people’: Making sense of California’s drinking water crisis; Watch the ‘bomb cyclone’ hit the North Coast; and more …

In the news today …

California agriculture in 2050 – where we are headed and why:  “At its monthly meeting on Nov. 5, the California State Board of Food and Agriculture heard a cautiously optimistic appraisal of agriculture’s future through 2050 from economist Daniel Sumner, director of the Agricultural Issues Center at UC Davis. Sumner believes that net farm income will continue to grow, even though it may experience ups and downs, and that growth specifics will hinge on the management of five key cost factors: Labor, water, climate change, regulations and research and development. … ”  Read more from the Turlock Journal here: California agriculture in 2050 – where we are headed and why

Radio show: In the studio: Farming in the age of climate change:  “The unseasonably warm and dry fall we are experiencing in the San Joaquin Valley is a reminder of the changing climate, here and around the world. In the studio, moderator Kathleen Schock explores how climate change is affecting the region’s top industry: agriculture. Her guests are Renata Brillinger who is Executive Director of the California Climate and Agriculture Network, Dr. Tapan Pathak from UC Merced, Ruth Dahlquist-Willard who is an Advisor with the UC Small Farm Program, and grape and raisin farmer Steven Cardoza.”  Listen to the radio show from KVPR here: Radio show: In the studio: Farming in the age of climate change

Valley residents sign on to Newsom recall effort:  “Bert Bertolotti stood in line at a table set up in front of My Garden Café Friday morning to sign a petition to recall Gov. Gavin Newsom.  The owner of the local garbage company, Bertolotti expressed dismay that Newsom’s administration has filed a lawsuit against the federal government to take up to 40 percent of water stored in three local reservoirs for the purposes of fish protection.  “He wants the water to flow out to the ocean,” said Berolotti. “They need to keep that water. They flow enough to the south.” … ”  Read more from the Turlock Journal here: Valley residents sign on to Newsom recall effort

Managing flood water for aquifer recharge: Economic considerations for policy:  “Groundwater is a critical source of freshwater. As of 2015, groundwater contributed almost 40% of the public water supply in the U.S. Many groundwater basins, however, have suffered from declining groundwater stocks due to sustained over pumping, leading to higher pumping costs, land subsidence, and other negative consequences.  California’s Central Valley overlays one such declining aquifer system. Amid an extreme drought, the state passed a law in 2014, the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA). The legislation requires local public agencies to address groundwater overdraft and its negative consequences by 2040. ... ”  Read more from the Global Water Forum here: Managing flood water for aquifer recharge: Economic considerations for policy

Delta: Using DNA to map out the food that keep fish alive:  “In April, a visitor to our research center’s open house watched a child dunk a net into a swimming pool, mimicking the act of how we trawl for tiny critters in the nearby estuary. Then that person asked me a question: “How bad is the health of the estuary, really?” As a new mother who has had to be careful to avoid eating local striped bass because of mercury levels in the fish, this question is one that hits me close to home. ... ”  Read more from the San Francisco Examiner here: Using DNA to map out the food that keep fish alive

The sea wanted to take this California lighthouse. Now, it’s part of a conflict between a town and two tribes:  “It stood like a pretty sea siren atop the coastal bluff overlooking the rocky outcrops of Trinidad Bay.  … Then the ground began to crumble. Rain moved the earth. The bluff cracked, a sidewalk warped, and thus ended the charmed life of the Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse, which suddenly threatened to slide into the Pacific.  What followed was a drama in this Humboldt County hamlet, population 360, involving two Native American tribes, a women’s civic club and existential questions about California’s storied coastline and the forces of climate change. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here: The sea wanted to take this California lighthouse. Now, it’s part of a conflict between a town and two tribes

Essay: ‘Brown water for brown people’: Making sense of California’s drinking water crisis:  “It all started with a gut check earlier this year, on the side of Highway 8, which runs right through California’s agricultural Imperial Valley. When journalists write about rural America, I thought to myself, we tend to focus on white, blue-collar voters, on truck-stop diners or on farm owners. Rarely are farmworkers — mostly Latino, Spanish speaking, and often undocumented — at the center of our storytelling.  What might we be missing?  With this in mind, I began to research the lives of farmworkers in California today. … ”  Read more from the New York Times here: Essay: ‘Brown water for brown people’: Making sense of California’s drinking water crisis

WEATHER

Intense winter storm snarls traffic along major travel routes in California:  “An unusually intense winter storm downed trees, knocked out power and closed highways in parts of California on one of the busiest travel days of the year.  Motorists on Interstate 5 in Northern California reported being stuck on the road for hours and some spent the night in their cars, The Associated Press reported.  Christina Williams of Portland, Oregon, told the AP that it took her and her 13-year-son 17 hours to reach Redding, California, a journey that would normally take 10 hours. … ”  Read more from The Weather Channel here:  Intense winter storm snarls traffic along major travel routes in California

‘Atmospheric river’ could wallop Bay Area, Sierra on weekend:  “Thanksgiving Day should remain mostly dry across the Bay Area, but a looming weekend storm threatens to upend holiday travel plans for thousands of people catching flights or making the drive to and from the Sierra.  Urban areas can expect a break in rain for the holiday, but cold temperatures — dropping as low as the 30s in the North Bay and South Bay — will precede a second storm expected to move over the region starting Saturday. … ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here: ‘Atmospheric river’ could wallop Bay Area, Sierra on weekend

CW3E AR Update: 27 November event summary & outlook:  “A strong and rapidly intensifying cyclone made landfall over Northern CA and Southern OR resulting in numerous impacts. … ” Check out the data from the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes here: CW3E AR Update: 27 November event summary & outlook

Scroll down to check out the ‘bomb cyclone’ …

NATIONAL

Christmas tree prices rise as drought and fire hit crops and farms close:  “It’s the focal point of a magical holiday for many American families: the Christmas tree, adorned with ornaments and bright lights.  But for farmers, it’s an agricultural crop that they grow and sell to make a living. And hundreds of U.S. Christmas tree farms have closed in recent years as growers deal with tighter supply, shifting consumer preferences and climate change. … ”  Read more from CNBC here: Christmas tree prices rise as drought and fire hit crops and farms close

PFAS: Seeking natural solutions for a manmade problem:  “Bryan Berger is confronting one of the biggest environmental challenges of modern times: air, soil and water contamination caused by a group of toxic chemicals whose widespread use and human health consequences are only now coming to light globally.  In his lab at the University of Virginia School of Engineering, Berger, an associate professor of engineering, and his research team are developing novel ways to rid the planet of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, which are used in a huge number of consumer products but linked to serious health issues. Berger’s group is investigating a very unlikely source, Cannabis sativa, or industrial hemp, a fibrous workhorse known for its multitude of beneficial uses including in textiles, antimicrobials and health food. … ”  Read more from PhysOrg here: PFAS: Seeking natural solutions for a manmade problem

EPA: ‘Highly unusual’ move puts Region 9 chief’s office in LA:  “Despite alarms raised by EPA’s watchdog office and legal staff, Chief of Staff Ryan Jackson switched a top political appointee’s workplace from San Francisco to Los Angeles, moving him closer to home.  EPA Region 9 Administrator Mike Stoker’s “duty station” is now Los Angeles. Hundreds of the staff he oversees as regional administrator for EPA’s Pacific Southwest branch, however, are based in Region 9’s main office in San Francisco.  The change was the culmination of a campaign that began more than a year ago, according to emails, memos and personnel records obtained by E&E News under the Freedom of Information Act. ... ”  Read more from E&E News here: EPA: ‘Highly unusual’ move puts Region 9 chief’s office in LA

In commentary today …

Voluntary Agreements are a sea change in state water policy, says Mike Wade:  He writes, “Re: “Gov. Newsom’s Delta water plan is merely ‘Trump lite’” (Editorial, Mercurynews.com, Nov. 24):  As your Nov. 24 editorial makes clear, our water policy is complicated. It is jointly set by federal, state and local entities and seeks to meet the needs of all water users.  Gov. Gavin Newsom, in championing the Voluntary Agreements, is seeking a generational change in how we manage water. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here:  Voluntary Agreements are a sea change in state water policy

In regional news and commentary today …

Northern California: Salmon habitat restoration project delivers results within a week:  “Five ACWA member agencies recently celebrated the completion of a habitat restoration project on the Sacramento River that produced results within a week.  The Rio Vista Side Channel Habitat Project in Red Bluff converted a seasonal side channel into nearly one acre of new aquatic habitat that will flow throughout the year. This creates refuge for juvenile salmonids before they migrate out to sea by providing slower flows, sources of food and protective cover from predators. The project also included native riparian planting. … ”  Read more from ACWA’s Water News here: Salmon habitat restoration project delivers results within a week

Chico: Testing the water:  As Cal Water examines wells for contaminants, manager says water is safe to drink:  “Back in 2016, California Water Service Co. took two of its groundwater wells in Chico out of service after tests showed they were contaminated with toxic flourinated chemicals known as PFAS—or per- and polyfluoralkyl substances—that have been linked to cancer and other adverse health effects.  The move was done quietly. Under questioning by the Butte County Water Commission earlier this month, Loni Lind, water quality manager for Cal Water, told the board the public was not notified at the time. … ”  Read more from the Chico News & Review here: Chico: Testing the water:  As Cal Water examines wells for contaminants, manager says water is safe to drink

Firm hired to study options for Potter Valley Project: “A coalition now calling itself the Two-Basin Partnership announced this week that it has hired a firm to evaluate different options for the hydro-electric dam called the Potter Valley Project.  “I am committed to finding a realistic, sustainable solution that provides water to the people who rely on this project year-round,” said Janet Pauli, chairwoman of the Mendocino County Inland Water and Power Commission. The commission is one member of the five-partner coalition, which also includes California Trout, Humboldt County, the Round Valley Indian Tribes and Sonoma Water. “It’s a long-term, complex process, but the partnership is committed to working together toward our shared objectives, and the feasibility study is going to help us evaluate our options.” … ”  Read more from the Ukiah Daily Journal here: Firm hired to study options for Potter Valley Project

Future of Potter Valley power project could hinge on options for dam at Lake Pillsbury:  “Sonoma County’s water agency is one of five partners putting up $400,000 for an assessment of the economic, environmental and other issues involved in taking over the federal license for a remote Mendocino County hydropower project that plays a key role in the North Bay’s water supply.  The partnership, which includes Mendocino and Humboldt counties, local tribes and environmentalists, is the lone entity seeking to acquire the license to the Potter Valley Project, owned by PG&E since 1930 but surrendered by the debt- ridden utility in January and still facing a 2022 relicensing deadline. … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat here: Future of Potter Valley power project could hinge on options for dam at Lake Pillsbury

Salinas Valley farmers and county water agency settle lawsuit over reservoir operations.  “A recent settlement between Monterey County, Monterey County Water Resources Agency, and a coalition of Salinas Valley farmers brings an end to a protracted legal battle over reservoir operations during drought conditions. In 2017, the Salinas Valley Water Coalition, representing Salinas Valley growers, filed two suits against MCWRA and the county. They alleged that MCWA violated established water rights when it restricted flows from Nacimiento and San Antonio reservoirs in 2014 and 2015, during the height of the drought. … ”  Read more from Monterey Weekly here:  Salinas Valley farmers and county water agency settle lawsuit over reservoir operations

With the future of the Monterey Peninsula’s water supply—and water utility—on the line, we take a look back at how we got here:  “There’s a war over the future of water on the Monterey Peninsula and it’s taking place in the board chambers of half a dozen state and local government entities. It’s also taking place on social media and in the press.  One of the phrases that keeps popping up in both of these debates – about the future water supply and the future water utility – is deja vu. People who have lived in the area for decades recall the prior incarnations of this war, moments when the public finally thought a solution is at hand only to find that some ruling or voter initiative has changed everything. ... ”  Read more from Monterey County Weekly here: With the future of the Monterey Peninsula’s water supply—and water utility—on the line, we take a look back at how we got here

Finished Paso basin sustainability plan awaits final approval:  “Sidestepping continued grumbles from the agricultural industry, the Paso Robles Basin Cooperative Committee recommended final approval of a finished groundwater sustainability plan on Nov. 20, a move that precipitates its submission to the California Department of Water Resources.  The 20-year groundwater plan, required by state law, aims to bring the Paso Robles Groundwater Basin back into balance. … ”  Read more from New Times SLO here: Finished Paso basin sustainability plan awaits final approval

Greater Kaweah GSA to partner on easing climate change impacts:  “As California’s groundwater aquifers continue to deplete at what experts consider to be an alarming rate, the state passed a comprehensive groundwater management law in 2014 that is changing how this precious resource is used for the next 20 years and beyond.  Under the law, the state established groundwater sustainability agencies, which are tasked with drafting extensive plans on managing groundwater for their designated water basins. The Greater Kaweah Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA), which is one of three for the Kaweah subbasin, covers most of the subbasin throughout Tulare and Kings counties. … ”  Read more from the Foothills Sun-Gazette here: Greater Kaweah GSA to partner on easing climate change impacts

Locals gear up for fight to keep Kings River water away from Kern district:  “Just as they did more than two generations ago, Kern County farmers are looking to another Central Valley river to the north to refill their groundwater shortfall.  But this time around, natives in the Kings River watershed are “sharpening their knives” to fight off what they say is a desperate water grab.  The sprawling Semitropic Water Storage District, in the northwest corner of Kern County, has filed an application with the State Water Resources Control Board claiming the Kings River Water Association has forfeited two of its floodwater licenses by not using that water. ... ”  Read more from the Fresno Bee here: Locals gear up for fight to keep Kings River water away from Kern district

Water in Tehachapi: A precious commodity in the past and in our future:  “Historically, water is often valued more than gold, runs short of supply, and is even more needed now than in Tehachapi’s past.  Let’s take a look at the water situation in the greater Tehachapi area from the days of old to the present. … ”  Read more from the Tehachapi News here:  Water in Tehachapi: A precious commodity in the past and in our future

4 million gallons of raw sewage spilled in Laguna Beach prompts closure of South O.C. ocean and bay areas:  “A sanitary sewer leak at the Ben Brown Golf Course in Laguna Beach has spilled about 4 million gallons of raw sewage, prompting the Orange County Healthcare Agency to close the ocean and bay areas from Pelican Point at Crystal Cove in Newport Beach to the Poche Beach interface in Dana Point and San Clemente.  The spill, caused by a broken force main, was first reported at 4:40 p.m. on Wednesday, November 27. … ”  Read more from the OC Register here: 4 million gallons of raw sewage spilled in Laguna Beach prompts closure of South O.C. ocean and bay areas

Along the Colorado River …

Water transfer from Colorado River to central Arizona faces stiff opposition:  “The latest proposal to transfer water from the Colorado River to central Arizona has a fight on its hands.  Queen Creek is trying to buy an annual entitlement to 2,083.1 acre-feet of Colorado River water from a farming and investment company that owns land in Cibola Valley, in far west La Paz County. An acre-foot of water serves a family of four for about one year. … ”  Read more from Cronkite News here: Water transfer from Colorado River to central Arizona faces stiff opposition

Watch the ‘bomb cyclone’ hit the North Coast …

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

SCIENCE NEWS: The twilight world of gray foxes; Fish in CA estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat; Coastal fog linked to high levels of mercury found in mountain lions, study finds; In the Sierra, scientists bet on ‘survivor’ trees to withstand drought and climate change; and more…

WATER PLAN eNEWS: ~~ Flood-MAR Article~ Environmental Review~ SGC Grants~ Flash Drought~ Data Framework~ Implementation Journal ~~

DELTA eNEWS: ~~ eDNA Symposium~ Sip & Shop~ Locke Holiday~ GDT Meetings ~~

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

(Visited 756 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply