BLOG ROUND-UP: Is it drought yet?; Newsom v JFK!; Sustaining wild Salmon and Steelhead above Central Valley dams; We need to talk about environmental projects that fail; Stealing the Rain; and more …

In blogs this week: Is it drought yet? Dry October-November 2019; Newsom v JFK!; Sustaining wild Salmon and Steelhead above Central Valley dams; OtPR is made of hairy and audacious; Clearing the water on the biological opinions; We need to talk about environmental projects that fail; Stealing the Rain; and more …

Is it drought yet? Dry October-November 2019: Jay Lund writes, “So far, October and November 2019 has been the driest (or almost the driest) beginning of any recorded water year with almost zero precipitation. (The 2020 water year began October 1, 2019 – so you might have missed a New Year’s party already.)  Should we worry about a drought yet?  … ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here: Is it drought yet? Dry October-November 2019

blog-round-up-previous-editionsNewsom v JFK!  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “The Sacramento Bee story below says “Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration said Thursday it will sue the Trump administration over its efforts to push more water through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.”  But, really, Gov. Newsom is not suing the Trump Administration, he’s suing farmers in our Central Valley.  They are the ones who, in the end, will not get the water.  Today is the anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and a good time to remember when he came to the Valley in 1962 to dedicate the San Luis Reservoir. … ” Continue reading at Families Protecting the Valley here: Newsom v JFK!

Sustaining wild Salmon and Steelhead above Central Valley dams: The case for two-way trap and haul:  Tom Cannon writes, “Why should we expand spawning populations of listed salmon and steelhead to areas above dams and impassible falls in the Central Valley? The answer is: because the genetic makeup and wild traits of populations upstream of existing barriers can be controlled, restored, and preserved.  At present, the genetic makeup of salmon and steelhead populations below dams is continually being compromised by hatchery fish and strays to and from other watersheds. … ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here: Sustaining wild Salmon and Steelhead above Central Valley dams: The Case for Two-Way Trap and Haul

I [OtPR] am made of hairy and audacious. On the Public Record writes, “I dunno, man. I read this and I kinda felt like some of it was directed at me. I hope not, because they have better things to think about. But I’d like to use that op-ed to make a point related to something that Mr. Sabalow mentioned yesterday. Mr. Sabalow said that nothing ever happens in water. This op-ed by Secretaries Crowfoot and Blumenfeld nicely illustrates that when you have no destination, you go nowhere. ... ”  Read more from On the Public Record here: I am made of hairy and audacious.

Clearing the water on the biological opinions:  The California Farm Water Coalition writes, “There has been a lot of discussion recently about the federal rules known as biological opinions that are intended to protect threatened and endangered species in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a biological opinion, “…is a document that states the opinion of the service whether or not a federal action is likely to jeopardize the continued existence of listed species in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitat.” … ”  Read more from the California Farm Water Coalition here: Clearing the water on the biological opinions

A time to move forward:  The Northern California Water Association writes, “Amid the flurry of state and federal actions and statements last week surrounding the Delta, the Northern California Water Association and water suppliers in the Sacramento River Basin remain fully committed to the major efforts underway to improve conditions for fish and wildlife, while maintaining important supplies for cities, rural communities and farms. … ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here: A time to move forward

California’s environment, families and businesses deserve our best:  The Coalition for a Sustainable Delta writes, “Governor Newsom has spent his first year as Governor reimagining the California Dream and laying out his blueprint for a California for All. A critical component of the Governor’s vision is a healthy environment and a strong economy. Every Californian, from families to business owners to farmers and environmentalists, has an interest in a reliable water supply to meet societal demands and also support the state’s extensive fish and wildlife. So why hasn’t the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta received the level of care and management it deserves?  Environmental regulations requiring releases of millions of acre-feet of water over the last decade have failed to improve the Delta ecosystem, including multiple endangered fish populations. … ”  Read more from the Coalition for a Sustainable Delta here: California’s environment, families and businesses deserve our best

Old v new forests:  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “Eighteen years ago a man by the name of George Gruell published a book that compared old and new images of the mountain landscapes in California.  The book review in the L.A. Times from 2001(Photos Reveal Changes in Sierra) said “in scene after scene, the contemporary photographs document dense forest and lush growth. Their historical twins show leaner country in which the trees were fewer, the ground more open, the meadows more abundant.” … ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here: Old v New Forests

We need to talk about environmental projects that fail:  David Shiffman writes, “For Allison Catalano, a former U.S. Navy logistics officer and strategic-management consultant, learning from failure is the key to success.  “I’ve always been a part of organizations that handle failure head on — or at least attempt to,” she says. Addressing failure, she adds, shows us what doesn’t work so that we can find out what does.  Now a Ph.D. candidate at Imperial College of London, Catalano is researching two important environmental questions: What makes conservation projects fail? And what can we learn from those failures? … ”  Read more from The Revelator here: We need to talk about environmental projects that fail

Event at Gray Lodge celebrates partnership to improve Pacific Flyway habitat:  The Northern California Water Association writes, “Pacific Flyway supporters gathered at the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area on Wednesday to celebrate the kick-off of the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area Water Supply Project. This multi-benefit system improvement project will increase the conveyance capacity and improve water supply reliability for the Wildlife Area and surrounding farms.  Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, which is also known as a “Jewel in the Pacific Flyway,” is a 9,100 acre property on the north side of the Sutter Buttes that provides habitat for more than 300 species, including resident and migrant birds. … ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here: Event at Gray Lodge celebrates partnership to improve Pacific Flyway habitat

Tioga Inn development proposes significant adverse impacts: Inadequate DSEIR prompts strong public response to Mono County:  Bartshé Miller writes, “Mono County is considering a newly-proposed development of unprecedented scale in the Mono Basin. The controversial Tioga Inn project proposes an expansion at the Tioga Gas Mart (often called the Mobil Mart), and includes a 100-unit “Workforce Housing Village” of two-story buildings on top of a highly visible bluff at the junction of Highway 395 and Highway 120 West.  The Tioga Inn project has an alarming number of “significant and unavoidable adverse environmental impacts,” as stated in the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Report (DSEIR) released this summer. … ”  Read more from the Mono-Logue here: Tioga Inn development proposes significant adverse impacts

Stealing the Rain: Brian Richter writes, “One of the great benefits of my role as the water scarcity editor for the international Water Security journal is that it forces me to read a lot more journal articles than I otherwise would. And sometimes I get a sneak peek at something really cool!  Patrick Keys of Colorado State University and his co-authors recently contributed a paper entitled “Invisible water security: Moisture recycling and water resilience.” In this fascinating paper (OK I’m a water science geek so this stuff excites me) the authors discuss and quantify the global hydrologic processes of water evaporating from land and the ocean surface, flowing as cloud moisture through the atmosphere (sky rivers!), and falling out again as rain or snow. … ”  Read more from the Sustainable Waters blog here: Stealing the Rain

FEMA’s in Need of Reform:  Jonathan Wood writes, “Last week, a nominee to lead the Federal Emergency Management Agency generated fireworks when, during his confirmation hearing, he said he does not know the cause of climate change.  The comment reignites the debate over how FEMA, which provides subsidized flood insurance and disaster relief, should respond to the risk climate change poses for both functions. Fortunately, given FEMA’s role, the cause of this increased risk shouldn’t matter. If FEMA recognizes the risk, the only question is figuring out whether and how to respond to it. … ”  Read more from PERC here: FEMA’s in Need of Reform

Westward Heave-ho: How a federal agency’s move to Colorado threatens public lands, science and the climate:  Casey O’Brien writes, “When it comes to public lands, the National Park Service has better name recognition among Americans, but it’s the Bureau of Land Management, along with the USDA’s Forest Service, that has more influence. The BLM has jurisdiction over 246 million acres — more than the Forest Service and three times that of the National Park Service — and makes important decisions about oil and gas leasing, mining, grazing, recreation, and other uses of those lands.  Now it seems the BLM’s vast holdings may be in peril due to continued attacks on the agency by the Trump administration, including its decision to relocate the agency’s headquarters to Grand Junction, Colorado, and scatter other employees around the country. ... ”  Read more from The Revelator here: Westward Heave-ho: How a Federal Agency’s Move to Colorado Threatens Public Lands, Science and the ClimateDaily emails

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About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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