BLOG ROUND-UP: The good, the bad, and the ugly in the new CVP/SWP biological opinions; Climate change and the Delta: Facing an uncertain future together; Why do elected progressives feel safe espousing retrograde water policy?; For Pattie Gonia, the trail is a runway; and more … 

RIchmond San Rafael Bridge; Photo by Craig Gibson

In water blogs this week: The good, the bad, and the ugly in the new non-jeopardy biological opinions for the CVP/SWP; Climate change and the Delta: Facing an uncertain future together; Reimagining our water system: Utilizing natural infrastructure— healthy headwaters; Why do elected progressives feel safe espousing retrograde water policy?; PG&E: A Casualty of Global Warming?; Pattie Gonia: For this outdoor drag queen, the trail is a runway; and more …

The good, the bad, and the ugly in the new non-jeopardy biological opinions for the CVP/SWP:  Tom Cannon writes, “The Endangered Species Act (ESA) directs all federal agencies to work to conserve endangered and threatened species and to use their authorities to further the purposes of the Act.  … The new proposed action from Reclamation can now go into effect without RPAs that would hinder Reclamation from maximizing water deliveries. The new Biological Opinions will govern project operations under a wide array of vague commitments to protect and recover listed species: some good, some bad, and some simply ugly. … ”  Continue reading at the California Fisheries Blog here: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly in the New Non-Jeopardy Biological Opinions for CVP/SWP

blog-round-up-previous-editionsClimate change and the Delta: Facing an uncertain future together:  Susan Tatayon writes, “On a recent trip to Florida, I visited the Kennedy Space Center, the primary launch site for NASA’s spaceflight missions to the International Space Station (ISS). This iconic facility is not just a hallmark of space exploration; it exemplifies what is possible when goals are clear and the best and brightest work together to achieve those goals. At any given time aboard the ISS, crewmembers are busy maintaining the station’s physical structure or conducting a wide range of science experiments, all while continuously communicating with each other and 16 different countries back on earth.  This visit inspired me to consider our own collaborative endeavors here at home, and I immediately thought of the community of folks addressing climate change in the context of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and California’s unique water landscape. ... ”  Read more from the Delta Stewardship Council blog here:  Climate change and the Delta: Facing an uncertain future together

Reimagining our water system: Utilizing natural infrastructure— healthy headwaters:  The Northern California Water Association blog writes, “The Northern California Water Association (NCWA) and water leaders in Northern California have appreciated the opportunity to engage with the Newsom Administration and our many partners to help develop and then implement “a water resilience portfolio that meets the needs of California’s communities, economy, and environment through the 21st century.”  Building on the Governor’s call to “utilize natural infrastructure,” there are unique opportunities in the Sacramento River Basin to enhance and expand utilization of natural infrastructure for multiple benefits, including our forested headwaters. ... ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here: Reimagining our water system: Utilizing natural infrastructure— healthy headwaters

Why do elected progressives feel safe espousing retrograde water policy?  On the Public Record writes, “Self-pity is a mortal sin, yet I find myself afflicted. Wwhhhyyyyy????, I whine to myself. WHY must I suffer like this? We had eight years of the Brown administration, who sacrificed every other water priority to advance the RadWaterBadBoy. Fine, I thought. Brown was an aberration. We elected Newsom, who really is doing other progressive things in other fields. Yet we get bullshit VSAs and reported inclusion of the extra bullshit SJV Water Blueprint.  Elected progressives furthering retrograde water policy is widespread. … ”  Read more from On the Public Record here: Why do elected progressives feel safe espousing retrograde water policy?

We need to replace water districts with something new.  On the Public Record writes, “WHEREAS water districts were created to deliver water for economic growth. That mission makes them unable to do the tasks of this century, which are to wisely manage contraction and risk ... ”  Read more from On the Public Record here: We need to replace water districts with something new.

What about people?  Maybe it will wake up the people of California to see they have a right to have their electricity delivered reliably and regularly.  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “California must be about the only state or country in the world that can’t deliver electricity to its citizens when the winds blow above 30mph.  Pretty amazing for a state that prides itself on being the gold standard for progressive ideas.  Maybe it’s time to rethink progressive ideas.  … ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here: What about people?  Maybe it will wake up the people of California to see they have a right to have their electricity delivered reliably and regularly.

PG&E: A Casualty of Global Warming?  Bruce Frohman writes, “Amid the power outages and horrific fires caused by downed transmission lines, a growing chorus of politicians is suggesting restructuring Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Although the company operates efficiently with a large economy of scale, San Francisco and other urban areas are looking into breaking off pieces of territory to establish locally owned power companies. Is this a good idea? ... ”  Read more from the Valley Citizen here: PG&E: A Casualty of Global Warming? 

Night of the living dead salmon:  Kelly Neal and Gabe Saron write, “On a cool and misty morning somewhere south of Redding, California, jet boats roar across the tranquil Sacramento River. Armed with tridents, machetes and poleaxes, it seems akin to a scene from an action movie; except that “California Department of Fish and Wildlife” is painted on the boats. One by one, the boats peel out of formation and hole up in eddies and backwaters beside the main river channel. Then, they wait. Once a pale shadow is spotted within the murky depths of the riverbed, someone onboard thrusts a trident into the water and sinks its barbed prongs into something fleshy. ... ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here: Night of the living dead salmon

American River Fall-Run Status through 2018:  Tom Cannon writes, “In my August 2017 post on the status of American River fall-run Chinook salmon, I analyzed recruitment through the fall 2016 spawning run. The 2016 run was a product of fall 2013 spawners (brood year 2013). In a May 2019 post, I discussed the survival of hatchery brood year releases through 2014. After record low escapement/recruitment in 2008 and 2009, there was a modest recovery from 2010-2014, followed by lower runs in 2015 and 2016 (brood years 2012 and 2013), the product of the 2012-2016 drought. Brood years 2012, 2013, and 2014 suffered from poor juvenile survival of hatchery and wild salmon in critical drought years 2013-2015. Overall production was sustained by Bay and coastal hatchery smolt releases (trucking and pen releases). ... ”  Continue reading at the California Fisheries blog here: American River Fall-Run Status through 2018

Trinitas Partners hires OID water attorney: conflict?  Eric Caine writes, “In a move very likely to revive local controversies and bitter memories, Oakdale Irrigation District (OID) water attorney Tim O’Laughlin has been hired by Trinitas Partners to manage its huge Hawaiian farming operation in Maui, where it’s known as “Mahi Pono.”  Now an entity with too many names and subsidiaries to list, Trinitas/Mahi Pono recently purchased 56,000 acres in Maui for $267 million from sugar cane growers Alexander & Baldwin. As was the case when Trinitas was annexed into the Oakdale Irrigation District in 2013, Mahi Pono’s arrival on Maui has been clouded by controversy. … ”  Read more from Valley Citizen here: Trinitas Partners hires OID water attorney: conflict?

And lastly … Pattie Gonia: For this outdoor drag queen, the trail is a runway:  Katie O’Reilly writes, “It all started with a pair of six-inch-heel boots, stuffed into a backpack.  Wyn Wiley, a native of Lincoln, Nebraska, grew up camping with fellow Eagle Scouts. He also grew up queer, closeted, and unable to be himself—especially in the traditionally masculine world of outdoor adventure. … It was only on a backpacking trip with friends a few months later that he felt safe enough to bust them back out and then strut along the Continental Divide Trail.  Thus Wiley’s “backcountry queen” alter ego, Pattie Gonia, was born. … ”  Read more from Sierra Magazine here: For This Outdoor Drag Queen, the Trail Is a RunwayDaily emails

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About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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