BLOG ROUND-UP: Why SB 1 must ensure that CESA applies to the federal CVP; Legislature: Beat up Trump if you must, but fix SB 1; CA water resilience – What’s in your portfolio?; It is fall X2 time again; The good, bad, and ugly of CA’s mandated urban water conservation; and more …

Knight’s Ferry Covered Bridge, photo by David Schroeder

This week in blogs: Why SB 1 Must Ensure that CESA Applies to the Federal CVP; Legislature: Beat Up Trump if You Must, but Fix SB 1; Overshoot: Trump’s Deregulatory Zeal Goes Beyond Even Where Industry Asks Him to Go; California Water Resilience – What’s in Your Portfolio?; It is Fall X2 Time Again; The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of California’s State-Mandated Urban Water Conservation during Drought; “An effort of this magnitude will never be perfect”; All I Want is an Accurate Colorado River Map; and more …

blog-round-up-previous-editionsWhy SB 1 Must Ensure that CESA Applies to the Federal CVP: Kate Poole writes, “Having made it through eight legislative committees and one floor vote, Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) now faces its final hurdles before becoming law: a majority “yes” vote on the floor of California’s Assembly, a final procedural vote in the Senate, and a signature from Governor Newsom. The bill’s authors and proponents, including NRDC, have worked long and hard to resolve the vast majority of concerns raised during the legislative session. Now, some are arguing that the bill should be stripped of its longstanding provision applying the State’s own Endangered Species Act to the operations of the federal Central Valley Project. Here’s why that’s a terrible idea. … ”  Read more from the NRDC here: Why SB 1 Must Ensure that CESA Applies to the Federal CVP  SEE ALSO: Newspapers Support SB 1 to Protect Against Trump Rollbacks, from the NRDC

Legislature: Beat Up Trump if You Must, but Fix SB 1:  Joel Fox writes, “In the California legislature, standing up for the environment while taking a shot at the Trump Administration is business as usual. But when business as usual casts a wide net that comes with consequences that can interfere with the state’s agriculture and the state’s economy then legislators should have second thoughts. Such is the situation with Senate Pro Tem Toni Atkins’ SB1. The bill is intended to protect the environment against measures put forth by the Trump Administration to weaken current environmental laws. … ”  Read more from Fox and Hounds here: Legislature: Beat Up Trump if You Must, but Fix SB 1

Why MWD and Other Water Agencies Oppose SB 1:  Doug Obegi writes, “As today’s Los Angeles Times reports, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD) and other water districts that obtain water from the State Water Project and federal Central Valley Project have been heavily lobbying against SB 1 in California (the Trump Defense bill).  These water districts are particularly focused on amendments that would: (1) eliminate a provision requiring that the Central Valley Project comply with the California Endangered Species Act, consistent with section 8 of the Reclamation Act of 1902 (which requires that the feds comply with state laws regarding the control and use of water resources); and (2) further weakening provisions of SB 1 regarding protections under the Endangered Species Act.  If you like Trump’s rollbacks of environmental protections, you’ll love the water districts’ proposed amendments to “fix” SB 1. ... ”  Read more from the NRDC blog here: Why MWD and Other Water Agencies Oppose SB 1

Overshoot: Trump’s Deregulatory Zeal Goes Beyond Even Where Industry Asks Him to Go:  Amy Sinden writes, “The Trump EPA last month proposed a new plan to remove oil and gas developers’ responsibility for detecting and fixing methane leaks in their wells, pipelines and storage operations. This proposal to axe the Obama-era methane rule is notable for two reasons. First, it is a huge step backward in the race to stabilize the climate, just at the moment scientists warn we need to move forward with unprecedented speed. Second, it’s the latest in a growing list of Trump rollbacks opposed by the very industries they’re purportedly intended to help. … ”  Continue reading at The Revelator here: Overshoot: Trump’s Deregulatory Zeal Goes Beyond Even Where Industry Asks Him to Go

California Water Resilience – What’s in Your Portfolio?  Susan Tatayon writes, “Recognizing the dynamic nature of the largest estuary on the west coast of the Americas, the Delta Reform Act tasked the Delta Stewardship Council with creating a sustainable management plan for the Delta to further the state’s coequal goals of a reliable statewide water supply and a restored Delta ecosystem, while protecting the Delta as a place where people live, farm, and recreate. Unlike previous approaches to Delta governance, this new plan was to weather the only true constant in the Delta – change.  Building on more than a century of lessons learned in California natural resource management, the Council’s Delta Plan is a long-term, comprehensive plan designed to adapt to changing conditions and achieve the state’s coequal goals. … ”  Read more from the Delta Stewardship Council blog here: California Water Resilience – What’s in Your Portfolio?

Delta tunnel – commitment to updated science on sea level rise:  “On August 28, 2019, the Sacramento Press Club held a panel on Droughts, Tunnels & Clean Water: A Conversation on California Water Policy .  Panelists included  Secretary of Natural Resources Wade Crowfoot, MWD general manager Jeff Kightlinger, and the State water Contractors general manager Jennifer Pierre.  The transcript of the panel is now up on Maven’s Notebook.  Deirdre Des Jardins’ question is recorded … ” Continue reading at the California Water Research blog here: Delta tunnel – commitment to updated science on sea level rise

It is Fall X2 Time Again:  Tom Cannon writes, “The 2008 Delta Smelt Biological Opinion for Central Valley Project (CVP) and State Water Project (SWP) includes the Fall X2 provision to keep brackish water west of the Delta through October in wet years to protect Delta smelt. X2 or the low salinity zone is defined as the location where salinity is 2 parts per thousand (about 4000 EC). Keeping X2 at Chipps Island (km 71 from the Golden Gate) benefits the longfin smelt and Delta smelt populations. In wet years, the smelt are protected by Delta agriculture salinity standards through August 15. The Fall X2 provision keeps X2 and the smelt west of the Delta through October. … ”  Read more from the Cal Fisheries Blog here: It is Fall X2 Time Again

Reimagining our Water System: Ensuring Access to Safe Drinking Water:  “The Northern California Water Association (NCWA) and water leaders in Northern California have appreciated the opportunity to engage with the Newsom Administration and our many partners to help develop and then implement “a water resilience portfolio (portfolio) that meets the needs of California’s communities, economy, and environment through the 21st century.” We use the principles in the Governor’s Executive Order as the starting point for our discussions and offer the following ideas as a roadmap for resilience we believe will add value to California’s water management system. … ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here: Reimagining our Water System: Ensuring Access to Safe Drinking Water

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of California’s State-Mandated Urban Water Conservation during Drought:  Amy Talbot writes, “Historic 2014 weather and water supply conditions prompted Governor Brown to order the state’s first mandated conservation targets for over 400 urban retail water suppliers starting in 2015.  Governor Brown tasked the State Water Resources Control Board (SWB) and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to manage and enforce these mandates.  With a 25% statewide water use reduction goal, state agencies, water suppliers, media, businesses, and residents worked together to implement supply and demand side actions to limit water use.  The state met this goal, reducing urban use by 24.5% from June 2015 through May 2016 equating to 524 billion gallons (1.6 million acre-feet) compared to 2013 water use. … ”  Continue reading at the California Water Blog here: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of California’s State-Mandated Urban Water Conservation during Drought

“An effort of this magnitude will never be perfect”:  “Twenty thousand years ago, a glacier churned down Lee Vining Canyon. Hundreds of feet thick at the top of the canyon, the glacier reached its maximum extent at the site of what is now the US Forest Service ranger station, just west of Lee Vining.  It is now easier to picture this arm of what scientists call the Tioga glaciation thanks to a new US Geological Survey map showing its extent throughout the Yosemite region. Greg Stock, geologist for Yosemite National Park and one of the map’s authors, spoke at the Mono Lake Committee last month. To a packed room, he described the jumble of moraines, boulders, and rock striations that he and his colleagues deciphered to build the map. … ”  Read more from the Mono-Logue blog here:  “An effort of this magnitude will never be perfect”

All I Want is an Accurate Colorado River Map:  Doug Kenney writes, “In recent months, we’ve probably all encountered a dozen or more articles reflecting on the 150-year anniversary of the Colorado River voyage of John Wesley Powell. It’s a story coming from the tail end of an era when map-makers used to be among the most adventurous of all scientists, a task today that can be mostly automated and driven by data coming from a variety of remote sensing technologies. In comparison to today, Powell’s techniques—albeit exciting—seem primitive and imprecise. Yet, I’m not sure we have really made much progress. … ”  Read more from the Inkstain blog here: All I Want is an Accurate Colorado River Map

Climate Breakdown in California and the Ethical Value of Complexity:  Obi Kaufmann writes, “We should call it Climate breakdown. Climate change is so disingenuous a term. The myopic argument that the world’s climate has always been changing is abhorrently lazy. It isn’t that the climate is changing that is the novelty of today, it is the alarming and obvious rate that, warmed by the atmospheric products of human industry, the machine of global climate is breaking down. The fingerprints of climate breakdown brought on by global warming are everywhere. … ”  Continue reading at Coyote Thunder here: Climate Breakdown in California and the Ethical Value of Complexity

Fighting Water Privatization with ‘Blue Communities’:  “It was 1985 and privatization, deregulation and free trade were in the air. Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and President Ronald Reagan were negotiating a free trade deal — a precursor to NAFTA. Among the goods it would cover: “Water, including … mineral waters … ice and snow.”  That set off alarm bells for Canadian activist Maude Barlow, as she explains in her new book Whose Water Is It, Anyway? Taking Water Protection into Public Hands … “ Continue reading at The Revelator here: Fighting Water Privatization with ‘Blue Communities’

The World Is in a Water Crisis and Climate Change Is Making it WorseJose Pablo Ortiz Partida writes, “The World Resources Institute (WRI) updated its Global Water Risk Atlas revealing that 17 countries–home of a quarter of the world’s population–will face “extremely high” water stress within 20 years. Water stress is defined as the ratio between water withdrawals (i.e., domestic, agricultural, and industrial water uses) and available renewable water supplies. Risk categories of ‘high’ and ‘extremely high’ water stress are reached when yearly withdrawals exceed 40 percent and 80 percent of available renewable water supplies, respectively. … ”  Read more from The Equation here: The World Is in a Water Crisis and Climate Change Is Making it Worse

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About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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