CA WATER NEWS WEEKLY DIGEST for March 2 through 8

A list of posts published on Maven’s Notebook this week …

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This week’s featured articles …

DR. JAY LUND: Water Supply Reliability Estimation: An overview

Water supply reliability. It’s a term often talked about in the realm of California water, but what does it really mean? And how can you describe it in quantitative terms? As the Delta Independent Science Board prepares to tackle the subject, Dr. Jay Lund gave this seminar on water supply reliability and how to estimate it as preparation for a workshop on the subject.

He began by pointing out that we’re supposed to be managing for coequal goals of ecosystem health and water supply reliability, but probably more than 90% of our discussions and our science is spent on the ecosystem health part. So in this presentation, he will give an overview of water supply reliability so everyone will have a common starting place to approach the subject.

Click here to read this article.


CA WATER COMMISSION: The Climate Registry: Water-Energy Nexus; Dam safety fee regulations; 2018 State Water Project Review

At the February meeting of the California Water Commission, the Commissioners heard a presentation on the Climate Registry, approved new regulations for dam safety fees, received an update on the Water Storage Investment Program, and started their annual review of the State Water Project.

Click here to read this article.


BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Dark Carbon and a Return to Abundance: How Detrital Floodplain Food Webs Can Help Recover Endangered Fish

In the pre-development Central Valley, winter-spring flooding once created a vast mosaic of productive wetland habitats that teemed with fish and wildlife. A major driver of this wildlife abundance was terrestrial carbon made available to aquatic food webs when floodplains were inundated.

Nineteenth and twentieth-century investments in drainage and a network of dams, canals, and levees transformed the Central Valley’s fertile floodplains into one of the world’s most productive agricultural regions. This system of water infrastructure also sped water off the landscape and cut off over 95% of the Central Valley’s floodplains from river channels. As a consequence, aquatic ecosystems no longer recruit the carbon (stored solar energy) needed to sustain robust food webs build abundant fish and wildlife populations. Put simply, levees starve aquatic ecosystems. Recovery of endangered fish populations will likely be impossible without first recovering some of the landscape-scale ecological processes which once supported historic abundances of native species.

Click here to read this article.


In water news this week from around the web …

WEEKEND DAILY DIGEST: Voluntary agreements shared with State Water Board. Will they replace disputed flow plan?; Hurtado introduces legislation to fix Friant-Kern canal; Area congressmen join together to provide federal support for proposed Sites Reservoir; Legislation would add local reps to Delta Stewardship Council; How atmospheric river storms tamed California’s drought; Snow in Forecast for a 2,500-Mile Path From California to Maine; Another major flood along Russian River raises question of what’s to be done; Breaking impasse, feds will include Salton Sea in seven-state drought plan, IID says; and more … READ IT HERE:  Weekend Daily Digest

MONDAY: A massive aquifer lies beneath the Mojave Desert. Could it help solve California’s water problem?; Yuba Water agency finalizes proposal for state’s Bay-Delta Plan; Guerneville floods more than anywhere in the Bay Area. Why can’t it be fixed?; Colorado River’s decline poses long-term risks for Southern Nevada; Surprise! It’s a Bipartisan Bill, and a Gift for California’s Desert Wildlife; and more … READ IT HERE:  Tuesday’s Daily Digest

TUESDAY: Federal effort to raise Shasta Dam by 18.5 feet is getting some serious pushback; Blockchain is overhyped, but it’s also perfect for California’s drought problem; Measuring success in groundwater management; Lake Oroville continues to rise as Hyatt Powerplant releases stay steady; California’s Water Wars & Cannabis: Will Small Growers Be the Losers?; Wildfire in California no longer stifled by wet winters, scientific report finds; Another atmospheric river takes aim at California; Feds say Salton Sea won’t be adversely impacted by multi-state drought plan; IID can join when it chooses, and more … READ IT HERE:  Tuesday’s Daily Digest

WEDNESDAY: Federal effort to raise Shasta Dam by 18.5 feet is getting some serious pushback; Blockchain is overhyped, but it’s also perfect for California’s drought problem; Measuring success in groundwater management; Lake Oroville continues to rise as Hyatt Powerplant releases stay steady; California’s Water Wars & Cannabis: Will Small Growers Be the Losers?; Wildfire in California no longer stifled by wet winters, scientific report finds; Another atmospheric river takes aim at California; Feds say Salton Sea won’t be adversely impacted by multi-state drought plan; IID can join when it chooses, and more … READ IT HERE:  Wednesday’s Daily Digest

THURSDAY: Up to 3 feet of snow in the forecast for the Sierra Nevada as storm hammers California; The 20th atmospheric river of the season is set to drench California, again; Department of Water Resources hits pause on WaterFix; Wet winter aids groundwater replenishment; Forget the past, carbon-rich soil may be the ticket to sustainable agriculture; Why California’s droughts and floods will only get worse; A long view of California’s climate; and more … READ IT HERE: Thursday’s Daily Digest

FRIDAY: Feds give California $205 million more for Oroville Dam spillway restoration, only a portion of Oroville Dam spillway cost; McCarthy wants high-speed rail funding to go to water projects; Ex-Zone 7 Manager Retiring from WaterFix Interim Leader Post; Can Newsom’s Tap Water Tax Plan Stay Afloat?; State Water Board holds informational meeting on PFAS; and more … READ IT HERE: Friday’s Daily Digest

This week’s breaking news …

News worth noting and other news items this week …

Weekly features …

Funding opportunities …

Announcements this week …

 

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