BLOG ROUND-UP: Changing pumping rules, Farmer applies Brown Act as water torture; Roaches of California; 21st century water management; and more …

Damon Slough, East Bay: Photo by Magic Media Productions

blog-round-up-previous-editionsChanging the Rules: Now because of some common sense by the Trump administration the old pumping rules are getting a new look:  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “The wrong-headed rules about pumping water out of the Delta for human and farm use could be changing soon.  That’s good news, but not for everyone.  Farmers and others in California watch in amazement as fresh water flows out to sea only to turn into salt water unsuitable for human use.  Now because of some common sense by the Trump administration the old pumping rules are getting a new look.  About time.  But, of course, any changes in the rules that could help people instead of fish gets a panic response from environmental organizations. … ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here:  Changing the Rules: Now because of some common sense by the Trump administration the old pumping rules are getting a new look

Bold Actions for People, Farms, and the Environment: The California Farm Water Coalition writes, “The United States Bureau of Reclamation is commencing a process aimed at modernizing the operations of the federal Central Valley Project (CVP).  For decades, the approaches to protecting the fish and wildlife dependent on the Bay-Delta watershed and estuary have been species-by-species and stressor-by stressor.  Those approaches have failed.  The effort by Reclamation responds to a consensus view within the scientific community and policy direction from the State of California – that, to improve protection and enhancement of fish and wildlife, comprehensive approaches are required. … ”  Read more from the California Farm Water Coalition here:  Bold Actions for People, Farms, and the Environment

Farmer applies Brown Act as water torture:  Eric Caine writes, “Most public officials would probably rather step on a nail than see someone like rice farmer Bob Frobose show up at a public meeting. Depending on your point of view, Frobose can be seen as a crank, activist, watch dog, concerned citizen, public advocate, and most everything in between and beyond.  With a persistence that rockets past intensity into obsession, Frobose differs from most civic critics in his ability to process abstruse legal arguments and mountains of detail. ... ”  Read more from the Valley Citizen here:  Farmer applies Brown Act as water torture

The Problem with Felicia!  “She has utterly failed in her duties to the state, treating this job as an extension of her old one – attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council.”  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “For those of you who have been longtime readers of our newsletter you know our dissatisfaction with the too close connection between the state water board and the NRDC.  The article below from Mike Dunbar at the Modesto Bee addresses the lack of trust people from our Central Valley have for Felicia Marcus, the Chairwoman of the State Water Board.  Her appointed term on the board is up and newly elected Governor Gavin Newsom will either be reappointing her or someone else in her place. … ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here:  The Problem with Felicia!  “She has utterly failed in her duties to the state, treating this job as an extension of her old one – attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council.”

Roaches of California: Hidden Biodiversity in a Native Minnow:  Dr. Peter Moyle writes, “If you inspect small streams in northern California, including those that seem too small or warm for any fish, you will often see minnows swimming in the clear water. Chances are you are seeing a very distinctive native Californian, usually called California roach.  This fish is a complex of species that occurs as far north as Oregon tributaries to Goose Lake and is widespread in tributaries to the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, as well as in rivers along the coast from the Eel River to Monterey. ... ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here:  Roaches of California: Hidden Biodiversity in a Native Minnow

Suisun Bay Zooplankton during droughts:  Tom Cannon writes, “Suisun Bay zooplankton are important prey for Bay-Delta fish populations, including smelt and juvenile salmon. During the recent 2012-2016 drought, the State Water Board issued temporary urgent change orders (TUCOs) that allowed lower Delta outflow than would normally be required in Critically Dry water years. Specifically, those Board orders allowed lower outflow in spring of 2014 and 2015. To evaluate the effects of these orders, I looked at June outflow versus June density of cladoceran and calanoid copepods, the primary fish prey in Suisun Bay and Marsh, the prime east Bay nursery area. … ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here:  Suisun Bay Zooplankton during droughts

Commission votes to protect Klamath-Trinity Spring Chinook salmon under CESA:  Dan Bacher writes, “The tastiest fish I’ve ever eaten was spring Chinook salmon from the Klamath River that I ate at a traditional tribal fish bake at Ocean Beach in San Francisco during the Salmon Aid Festival, the brainchild of commercial fisherman Mike Hudson, back in the summer of 2008. The dark orange, fat saturated meat dripped with delicious juice from the river-maturing fish.  This was during one of two years that recreational and commercial salmon fishing was closed in the ocean and sport fishing was closed in the ocean, due to the collapse of Central Valley fall-run Chinook salmon spurred by a combination of Delta water exports, poor ocean conditions and other factors. … ”  Read more from the Daily Kos here:  Commission votes to protect Klamath-Trinity Spring Chinook salmon under CESA

A storm to remember (with pictures):  “Last Friday, February 1st, a few snowflakes began to fall as we were leaving work for the day. Anticipating the forecasted storm, Mono Lake Committee staff hurried home to make sure woodpiles were covered and houses were ready for “the big storm.” And what a storm it was!  It started out slow, with only 4 inches of wet heavy snow falling overnight, but by Sunday, the temperatures had dropped and 9 more inches of dry fluffy snow had fallen. The town of Lee Vining transformed into a sparkling winter wonderland, with puffy snow pillows forming in yards and on roofs; each branch of the spruce trees in town wore big fluffy white hats. … ”  Continue reading at the Mono-Logue here:  A storm to remember

From rock to shining rock: How Big Bear got its dam:  “Despite its humble beginnings, the historic Old Big Bear Valley Dam still exists today. Originally pieced together with rock from surrounding hillsides and a single granite arch, the dam was created to provide water for agriculture farming in the area. Its historical significance to the region tells a story of strength, economic growth and water in the upper Santa Ana River Watershed.  In the late 1800s, there wasn’t much in what is now known as Big Bear. At the time, the mountain still boasted a healthy population of its namesake grizzly bear population, which were eventually hunted into extinction by 1906, and even the Big Bear Lake that we recognize today was not in existence. The only lake in the area was Baldwin Lake, which is now located east of Big Bear Lake. ... ”  Read more from Your So Cal Tap Water blog here:  From rock to shining rock: How Big Bear got its dam

Rising to the challenge of 21st century water management in Los Angeles:  Faith Kearns writes, “Early in its development, Los Angeles bound itself tightly to the rest of California by securing a water supply piped in from locations across the state. The preference for distant water sources had far reaching ramifications for the region, including dependence on the happenings – weather and otherwise – in those faraway places. It also functioned to mask the local water supplies that LA actually has.  The penchant for long-distance water led to the creation of a vast and expensive infrastructure system. It also spurred the development of a plethora of agencies – over 100 at this point – created to manage that imported water. … ”  Read more from the Confluence here:  Rising to the challenge of 21st century water management in Los Angeles

Climate Resilience in the Urban Context: Sustainable Landscapes for Southern California Businesses:  Cora Kammeyer writes, “Today the Pacific Institute, in collaboration with the CEO Water Mandate, California Forward, and Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority, released a new report, “Sustainable Landscapes on Commercial and Industrial Properties in the Santa Ana River Watershed,” accompanied by an interactive online map. This report represents phase one of a collective effort among the business community, public sector water managers, and other stakeholders to improve water and climate resilience through sustainable landscapes. With the release of the report, we are now launching into phase two, for which we are actively recruiting companies to participate. … ”  Read more from the Pacific Institute here:  Climate Resilience in the Urban Context: Sustainable Landscapes for Southern California Businesses

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About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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