BLOG ROUND-UP: Are water rights sufficient enough to protect water users?; Winnemem Wintu fight for restoration of salmon; No, Lake Powell is not inexorably headed toward “dead pool”; and more blog commentary…

blog-round-up-previous-editionsAre water rights sufficient enough to protect water users?  Mike Wade writes, “The judiciary is the safeguard of our liberty and of our property under the Constitution,” said U.S. Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes in Elimra, New York in 1907.  That quote exemplifies the reason that five irrigation districts on tributaries to the San Joaquin River as well as the city of San Francisco filed lawsuits recently against the State Water Resources Control Board. They are defending their water rights. … ” Read more from Fox and Hounds here: Are water rights sufficient enough to protect water users?

Winnemem Wintu Fight for Restoration of Winter Chinook Salmon to McCloud River above Shasta Dam: Dan Bacher writes, “In the short time that I was waiting at Discovery Park, located at the junction between the American and Sacramento rivers, for participants in the Winnemem Wintu’s Run4Salmon to board the boat making the journey from Sacramento to Colusa on the morning of September 22, anglers in two boats arrived back at the dock with their one fish limits of salmon.  Larry Mabalot, Benny Tayag and Oliver Pascual came in with three bright salmon up to 18 pounds. They landed their fish while trolling with Kwikfish and Silvertron spinners around the I Street Bridge.  “It was epic, “said Mabalot. “We landed our three fish in 30 minutes of fishing. It’s the best day we’ve had yet this year.” … ”  Read more from the Daily Kos here: Winnemem Wintu Fight for Restoration of Winter Chinook Salmon to McCloud River above Shasta Dam

How to Get a Dem to Love a Dam! Just tell them you’re using the money to build The Wall.  Families Protecting the Valley writes, “People like Congressman Jared Huffman have never been dam fans.  As an Assemblyman he said “we have to look further than this reflexive, historical impulse that says building dams will solve all our problems.  It’s not true. Water recycling, conservation, efficiency… dwarf the amount of water we could get through any (reservoirs) we build.” ... ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here:  How to Get a Dem to Love a Dam! Just tell them you’re using the money to build The Wall.

Voter Choices: When the San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to support the State Water Resources Control Board’s plan to restrict the City’s water supply, did they really mean it?  “San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin put forward a resolution…insisting that a city known for its environmental bona fides should stand up for the rivers and not partner with Washington to let them run dry.”  But, now they’v now joined a lawsuit to do just the opposite.  According to the San Francisco Chronicle, they “signed on to the lawsuit with several Central Valley farm communities, making for unlikely allies who rarely see eye-to-eye on water policy.”  Even before the lawsuit San Francisco’s Public Utilities Commission disagreed with the Supervisors.  … ”  Read more from Families Protecting the Valley here:  Voter Choices: When the San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to support the State Water Resources Control Board’s plan to restrict the City’s water supply, did they really mean it?

No, Lake Powell is not inexorably headed toward “dead pool”:  John Fleck writes, ” … Brian Maffly has a great piece in the Salt Lake Tribune about the challenges of Colorado River management, with a focus on Lake Powell.  But Maffly weakens an otherwise excellent survey of the river’s issues with the alarmist assertion that “without a change in how the Colorado River is managed, Lake Powell is headed toward becoming a ‘dead pool.’”  It is important when doing journalism about phenomena over time (and any other sort of analysis) to choose periods of record that accurately capture the thing you’re trying to understand and explain. … ”  Continue reading at the Inkstain Blog here:  No, Lake Powell is not inexorably headed toward “dead pool”

Late Fall Run Salmon Update:  Tom Cannon writes, “In an April 2017 post, I related factors likely important to late-fall-run Chinook salmon in the reach of the Sacramento River downstream of Shasta Reservoir. In this post, I update that assessment with 2015 and 2016 escapement estimates and coded-wire-tag return data from Coleman Hatchery smolt releases from brood years 2008-2013.  Late-fall-run Chinook salmon escapement reached new lows in 2015 and 2016 (Figure 1). The adult returns in these two years were the product of spawning in brood years 2012 and 2013 and of early rearing conditions in winter of 2013 and 2014 (critical drought years). ... ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here:  Late Fall Run Salmon Update

Interior Proposes New FOIA Rule that Inhibits Government Transparency:  Justin Pidot writes, “The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) guarantees public access to the records of federal agencies. It embodies the view that government works best when it works in the open. On the Friday between Christmas and New Year’s Eve, the Department of the Interior quietly published a proposed regulation that will make it harder for the public to access records. While most of Interior was shut down due to a lapse in appropriations, it seems that shielding itself from public scrutiny was too important to delay.  This move isn’t as surprising as it is disappointing. … ”  Read more from the Legal Planet here:  Interior Proposes New FOIA Rule that Inhibits Government Transparency

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About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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