BLOG ROUND-UP: San Joaquin flow objectives; Delta tunnels documents; Water rights are property rights; Fall pulsed flow protections; Urban ecology; and more …

“Merry Merry” by Angela Henderson

blog-round-up-previous-editionsGlass Half Full: State Water Board Adopts San Joaquin Flow Objectives for Update of Bay-Delta Plan: Chris Shutes writes, “The State Water Resources Control Board adopted new objectives for flows in the Lower San Joaquin River and for southern Delta salinity on Wednesday, December 12, 2018. The new plan for flow in the San Joaquin River will require as a start release from reservoirs on the Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Merced rivers of 40% of the unimpaired flow in the months of February through June. The adoption is part of the update of the State Board’s Bay-Delta Plan, whose last update was in 1995. ... ”  Read more from the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance here:  Glass Half Full: State Water Board Adopts San Joaquin Flow Objectives for Update of Bay-Delta Plan

Controversial Delta Tunnels Documents Exposed Day After Governor Says “They’ll Be Built”:  Dan Bacher writes, “At an event at the Sacramento Press Club that I attended on December 18 entitled, “Jerry Brown, the Exit Interview,” Brown reflected on his five decades in public office, the state of political discourse in the country and the future of the Golden State.  After journalist and author Miriam Pawel and Los Angeles Times columnist George Skelton asked Brown a number of wide-ranging questions, during the question and answer period, KCRA 3 asked him about what would happen to his two biggest projects, the Delta Tunnels and High Speed Rail, after he leaves the Governor’s Office in January.  “They’ll be built in a timely responsible way,” Brown said in reference to both projects. … ”  Read more at the Daily Kos here: Controversial Delta Tunnels Documents Exposed Day After Governor Says “They’ll Be Built”

Water rights are property rights too!  Erin Wilcox writes, “Stanford Vina Ranch Irrigation Company is a California non-profit water company that has been lawfully using water from Deer Creek for irrigation since 1862.  When drought struck the state in 2014 and again the following year, California’s State Water Resources Control Board ordered Stanford Vina to stop using water from Deer Creek or face serious penalties. With no other option, Stanford Vina complied, suffering major losses of crops and livestock.  Water rights, like those belonging to Stanford Vina, are property rights. … ”  Read more from the Pacific Legal Foundation here:  Water rights are property rights too!

A Sailor, a Squall and a Scientist:  The Northern California Water Association blog writes, “It all started in the coastal town of Santa Barbara. It is here, along California’s southern most portion of the Central Coast, where Ted Sommer was preparing to fulfil his childhood dream.  As early as he could remember, Ted had always been drawn to the ocean. And like his boyhood idol, famed sea explorer Jacques Cousteau, Ted wanted to better understand the great unknown.  “Marine biology was all I ever wanted to do, and this was going to be the first of many voyages out to the Pacific Ocean,” said Sommer. … ”  Read more from the Northern California Water Association blog here:  A Sailor, a Squall and a Scientist

Fall Pulsed Flow Protections for Winter Run Salmon: Tom Cannon writes, It is well known that juvenile winter-run salmon migrate downstream to the Delta from their upper Sacramento River rearing area near Redding/Red Bluff with the first fall-winter flow pulses.1 Protection of this critical migration of winter-run has been recommended in recent Delta proceedings. In the WaterFix petitions process at the State Water Resources Control Board, such protection is referred to as “pulse protection.” So based on the importance of protecting winter-run during this key life-history stage, one would think such protection would have been applied in the fall of our most recent wet year 2017 and below-normal 2018. A quick check of the facts indicates otherwise. ... ”  Read more from the California Fisheries blog here: Fall Pulsed Flow Protections for Winter Run Salmon

Three ways the farm bill will help Western states adapt to drought:  Kevin Moran writes, “The bipartisan farm bill that President Trump signed into law today contains far-reaching provisions to conserve water and build drought resilience in the American West.  Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) and other western lawmakers recognized the importance of providing more funding to support the region’s crucial and increasingly stressed water systems.  Western legislators secured planning and cost-share funding for groundwater recharge work in California, a critical improvement in the law as producers begin the challenging task of bringing groundwater basins back into balance under California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act. ... ”  Read more from the Growing Returns blog here:  Three ways the farm bill will help Western states adapt to drought

Urban Ecology: A Bright Future for Sustainable Cities: John Lieber writes, “As much as we love and need nature, the human population is growing and moving to cities. In 1950 just 30 percent of the world’s population was urban, but that number is projected to rise to 68 percent by 2050. This phenomenon is giving rise to megacities — cities with populations of 10 million or more. In 1990 there were 10 megacities, but by 2030 there are expected to be 41. Ninety percent of this growth is occurring in Asia and Africa. … ” Read more from the Revelator here:  Urban Ecology: A Bright Future for Sustainable Cities

And lastly … Bay Nature’s favorite photos of 2018.Daily emails

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About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

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