DAILY DIGEST: Governor Brown asks State Water Board to postpone today’s vote; Newsom wins, Denham has edge over Harder, but final results not in yet; Prop 3 defeated; Does the Inland Empire have enough water for population growth?; and more …

In California water news today, Governor Brown asks State Water Board to postpone today’s vote; Newsom wins, Denham has edge over Harder, but final results not in yet; Prop 3 defeated; New methods to be implemented to ensure safe drinking water in Redding; Does the Inland Empire have enough water for population growth?; State fully committed to Salton Sea, says John Laird; and more …

On the calendar today …

In the news today …

Governor Brown asks State Water Board to postpone today’s voteRead the letter here.

Gavin Newsom to become California’s next governor: “Democratic Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, a former San Francisco mayor known for groundbreaking pushes on universal health care, gay marriage and legal marijuana, swept to victory Tuesday in the race to replace Gov. Jerry Brown as California governor.  In his victory speech, Newsom issued a stinging rebuke of President Donald Trump without mentioning his name, while arguing that California is more than a “state of resistance.”  “The future belongs to California… It’s time to roll the credits on the politics of chaos and the politics of cruelty,” Newsom said. “We don’t separate families and we don’t lock kids in cages… (California) is a state of results and a state of refuge.” … ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Gavin Newsom to become California’s next governor

Denham has edge against Harder in nail-biter, but it’s still up in the air: “Denham or Harder? It was too close to call late Tuesday, according to incomplete returns for one of the most-watched House races in the United States.  With tens of thousands of votes yet to count, Republican incumbent Jeff Denham was ahead with 50.6 percent to Democratic challenger Josh Harder’s 49.4 percent. The gap at that time was 891 votes among 70,179 tallied so far, but final results could be days or even weeks away. … ”  Read more from the Modesto Bee here:  Denham has edge against Harder in nail-biter, but it’s still up in the air

Proposition 3: Big water bond measure appears headed for defeat: “A proposed $8.9 billion bond issue pitched as a way to help meet water needs in an arid, agriculture-dependent state plagued by drought appeared headed for defeat Tuesday night, with a majority of voters rejecting the plan.  As of 5 a.m. Wednesday, the measure was failing 52.4 percent to 47.6 percent with 90.5 percent of precincts reporting.  Proposition 3 would have added an estimated $430 million in annual state costs over 40 years, with interest payments boosting the total expenditure to $17.3 billion. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here:  Proposition 3: Big water bond measure appears headed for defeat  See also: Proposition 3: State Voters Douse Hopes for Big Water Bond, from KQED

In commentary today …

Trump is weaponizing California’s water issues:  Scott Michael Moore writes, “Few political issues have been more contentious in the West than water.  A century ago, politicians like Delph Carpenter, an attorney who helped write and promote the Colorado River Compact, openly waged political war against California, declaring it Colorado’s “greatest water enemy.”  Federal officials have sometimes taken one state’s side over another in water wars. But presidents have historically stayed out, with good reason: Westerners have long viewed Washington’s involvement in water issues with suspicion.  President Trump is suddenly breaking with this norm. ... ”  Read more from the LA Times here:  Trump is weaponizing California’s water issues

San Francisco’s Trump Water Strike:  The Wall Street Journal writes, “Some progressives will do anything to oppose Donald Trump, and in the resistance capital known as San Francisco this obsession now includes a willingness even to reduce the city’s water supply.  The California State Water Resources Control Board on Wednesday will consider a plan to reduce water deliveries from the San Joaquin River and its tributaries to farmers in the San Joaquin Valley as well as Bay Area denizens who derive their supply from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in Yosemite. … ”  Read more from the Wall Street Journal here:  San Francisco’s Trump Water Strike

In regional news and commentary today …

New methods to be implemented to ensure safe drinking water in Redding:  “The City of Redding announced on Monday that they will be implementing new strategies this winter to ensure that ash and debris from the wildfires will not impact the city’s supply of clean water.  Every winter, the Redding Water Division experiences an increase in sediment flowing from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta Lake and the Sacramento River. ... ”  Read more from KRCR here:  New methods to be implemented to ensure safe drinking water in Redding

‘Flushable’ Wipes Causing Backups In Sacramento’s Sewer System: “An effort to keep clean in the bathroom is causing problems down the drain. So-called “flushable” wipes are backing up Sacramento’s sewer system. It’s a problem Sacramento area sewer district workers are seeing more often.  Crews used to clean underground pumping stations once a month, but now they do it every one to two weeks. In Elk Grove, the pumping station was cleaned just six days ago and a mass of wipes is already accumulating. ... ”  Read more from CBS Sacramento here:  ‘Flushable’ Wipes Causing Backups In Sacramento’s Sewer System

San Francisco’s Embarcadero seawall measure wins easily:  “A ballot measure that would give San Francisco the money to start rebuilding the Embarcadero seawall was approved by voters Tuesday by a comfortable margin.  Proposition A, which needed a two-thirds vote to pass, had nearly 82 percent support, with 206,446 ballots tabulated.  Takeaway: The $425 million bond won’t pay for the entire upgrade to the 3-mile-long structure, which is mostly submerged and curls from Fisherman’s Wharf to China Basin. That cost is estimated as being at least $2 billion. ... ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here:  San Francisco’s Embarcadero seawall measure wins easily

Ventura: Legal victory secures protection for Santa Clara River Steelhead: “Conservation groups have scored a key courtroom victory for endangered Southern California steelhead harmed by operation of the Vern Freeman Dam on the Santa Clara River.  In a 152-page decision issued by Honorable Judge David O. Carter, the court found United Water Conservation District violated the federal Endangered Species Act by clearly causing past, ongoing, and future harm to steelhead as a result of the dam’s barrier to fish movement and diversion of water. Finding that United “dragged its feet” on critical solutions, and that “United has proved itself unable and unwilling to tackle the two key problems repeatedly identified as perpetuating harm to steelhead,” Judge Carter ordered measures needed to prevent the harm from continuing and to allow for steelhead recovery. … ”  Read more from the Ventura Breeze here:  Ventura: Legal victory secures protection for Santa Clara River Steelhead

As More People Move To The Inland Empire, How Is There Going To Be Enough Water?:  “Question: With all of the new housing going up and considering we’re in a drought area, how is local government going to provide enough water? – Joyce Paul, Rancho Cucamonga We Answered: Water scarcity is an issue people in Southern California think about a lot. California experienced one of the worst droughts in state history from 2011 to 2017. Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought State of Emergency in 2014, calling for statewide water conservation. By 2022, California residents will need to limit their indoor water use to 55 gallons of water per person a day. And by 2030, that number will drop to 50 gallons. … ”  Read more from KVCR here: As More People Move To The Inland Empire, How Is There Going To Be Enough Water?

Oceanside studies vulnerability to sea level rise:  “Oceanside holds its first public meeting this week to talk about which parts of the city are most vulnerable to sea-level rise.  The Californian Coastal Commission requires cities to update their Local Coastal Programs to adapt to rising seas, and this is the first step for Oceanside.  Principal planner Russ Cunningham said Oceanside is the only San Diego north coastal city with a harbor and a pier, plus the Strand that runs along the edge of the beach. These are just some of the public facilities that will be affected by sea-level rise, according to a new study of the city’s vulnerabilities. ... ”  Read more from KPBS here:  Oceanside studies vulnerability to sea level rise

State is fully committed to the Salton Sea’s future, says John Laird:  He writes, “The Salton Sea has been an anomaly since its very formation. Created when the entire Colorado River flowed unchecked into the Salton Sink for two years beginning in 1905, the modern-day Salton Sea is a changed ecosystem that supports introduced fish and a major stop on the Pacific Migratory Flyway.  Flows into the sea have declined over time, leaving higher concentrations of various contaminants. Coupled with evaporation, the result is a shrinking, increasingly saline lake. Previously submerged lake bed — known as playa  —  is being exposed, creating dust that can be hazardous as it dries and becomes airborne. ... ”  Read more from the Desert Sun here:  State is fully committed to the Salton Sea’s future

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

BAY DELTA SCIENCE CONFERENCE: Checking assertions with data: Untangling factors that constrain water exports from the San Francisco Bay estuary

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

(Visited 811 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply