DAILY DIGEST, weekend edition: SF mayor vetoes resolution supporting the Bay Delta Plan; Delta dilemma: Will WaterFix fix it or not?; Colorado River drought plan jeopardized by Pinal County water battle; and more … plus watch NASA release 450,000 gallons of water in under a minute

In California water news this weekend, San Francisco Mayor Breed vetoes supervisors’ resolution that supported state river plan; Delta dilemma: Will WaterFix fix it or not?; Monterey: The river is running through it; If Proposition 3 Passes, 2018 Could Become California’s Highest-Funded Year for Water Projects in Decades; Colorado River drought plan jeopardized by Pinal County water battle; and more … plus watch NASA release 450,000 gallons of water in under a minute …

In the news this weekend …

San Francisco Mayor Breed vetoes supervisors’ resolution that supported state river plan:  “San Francisco Mayor London Breed broke her silence on California’s latest water war Friday, saying she wouldn’t support a state river restoration plan that would mean giving up some of the city’s pristine Hetch Hetchy water.  In addition to her unexpected announcement, Breed vetoed a resolution passed unanimously by the Board of Supervisors earlier this week that offered the city’s blessing for the little-known, but far-reaching state initiative. ... ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here:  San Francisco Mayor Breed vetoes supervisors’ resolution that supported state river plan

Delta dilemma: Will WaterFix fix it or not?: “It was a mixed bag at an Oct. 26 conference sponsored by the Mountain Counties Water Resources Association as speakers took on the California WaterFix, the watershed and a host of other issues tied to the long-term health of the California Delta.  State Assemblyman Kevin Kiley kicked off the conference, noting it’s been a trying last few years for the Legislature when it comes to water issues because of the drought. One response by the Legislature has been to make significant investments in the state’s water infrastructure. The other is to reduce water demand by conservation, rationing and coercing people into restricting their use of water. Kiley said the latter approach is what’s been ascendant in Sacramento as more and more power has been given to the State Water Board (SWB), which is unelected. Now there is an effort to give the SWB the power to tax as well, noted Kiley. … ”  Read more from the Mountain Democrat here:  Delta dilemma: Will WaterFix fix it or not?

Showdown coming on state water plan? The State Water Resources Control Board is scheduled to vote on aspects of a controversial plan, November 7th, which lawmakers say would have big impacts on the region.  The board is planning to finalize parts of the Bay Delta Plan unless water districts come up with a voluntary settlement ahead of time with the board. ... ”  Read more from My Mother Lode here:  Showdown coming on state water plan? 

Monterey: The river is running through it:  “In the process of removing the San Clemente Dam in 2015, workers created a pristine route for the Carmel River, complete with step pools and nicely arranged boulders.  Winter floods have since transformed the river route into anything but pristine, but the “messy” course has been good for the native steelhead.  Lee Harrison, a research hydrologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center, studied how four major floods boosted the river’s natural processes and improved the spawning habitat for the trout since the dam removal. … ”  Read more from the Monterey Herald here:  The river is running through it

If Proposition 3 Passes, 2018 Could Become California’s Highest-Funded Year for Water Projects in Decades: “California voters will weigh in on 11 statewide ballot propositions on November 6th—a relatively small number for a state where the record number is 45. Still, the measures cover a lot of ground: everything from gas taxes to housing to breaks for emergency workers to daylight savings time to water conservation. There was even a ballot measure (Proposition 9) that could have split California into three states, before the state Supreme Court struck it from the ballot over the summer. Some of the remaining propositions are more straightforward than others, and Proposition 3, which would authorize the state to sell $8.9 billion in bonds to pay for water infrastructure and environmental projects, has left many voters confused. ... ”  Read more from Pacific Standard here:  If Proposition 3 Passes, 2018 Could Become California’s Highest-Funded Year for Water Projects in Decades

Young Activists Can Sue Government Over Climate Change, Supreme Court Says: “A group of young people can sue the federal government over its climate change policies, the Supreme Court said Friday. Since it was first filed in 2015, the government has requested several times that Juliana v. United States be dismissed.  “I want to trust that we are truly on track for trial without having further delays,” Kelsey Juliana, a 22-year-old plaintiff, said in a statement, “but these defendants are treating this case, our democracy, and the security of mine and future generations like it’s a game. I’m tired of playing this game.” ... ”  Read more from KQED here:  Young Activists Can Sue Government Over Climate Change, Supreme Court Says

In commentary today …

State Water Board Member D’Adamo: We must find a better approach: “Protecting California’s fish is an important duty of the State Water Resources Control Board. But it is not our board’s only duty.  I am one of five members on the board, and the only one who lives in the San Joaquin Valley. Our board is required to provide for the reasonable protection of all beneficial uses of water. This calls for balancing the needs of fish with the needs of cities and the people who live in them – people whose lives and jobs are dependent on that water. We must also consider the needs of agriculture, and the beneficial use of water to grow crops. ... ”  Continue reading at the Modesto Bee here:  State Water Board Member D’Adamo: We must find a better approach

In regional news and commentary this weekend …

El Dorado Irrigation District reaffirms commitment to additional water rights:  “A review of a draft Capital Improvement Plan, presentation by the district’s lobbyist in Sacramento and affirmation of the district’s continuing commitment to an Inter-County Coordination Agreement (ICCA) were on the agenda at Monday’s board meeting of the El Dorado Irrigation District.  One of the most contentious items was reaffirming the district’s commitment to the El Dorado Inter-County Coordination Agreement between EID, El Dorado County and the El Dorado County Water Agency. … ”  Read more from the Mountain Democrat here:  EID reaffirms commitment to additional water rights

San Mateo: Clean Water Program earns EPA infrastructure loan invite: “The city of San Mateo, in partnership with Foster City, received a major boost from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week as it was invited to apply for a $277 million loan to support the Clean Water Program, according to city officials.  The EPA announced the Peninsula-based program as one of only 39 across the country to be invited to apply for a Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act loan. … ”  Read more from the Daily Journal here:  San Mateo: Clean Water Program earns EPA infrastructure loan invite

Santa Cruz: Impacts of water projects under review county-wide:  “Preparing to begin spreading the wealth of its riverwater to neighboring agencies, the Santa Cruz Water Department is set to study the impacts of changing it water-sharing rules.  In an initial report outlining the areas the city plans to study for environmental impacts, a city notice of preparation lays out the potential to share its unused water supply with Soquel Creek Water District, Scotts Valley Water District, San Lorenzo Valley Water District and Central Water District. Though the city struggles to meet customers’ water supply during drought years, the water system’s problem is that it does not have sufficient storage capacity to stock up ahead of dry years. The rest of Santa Cruz County has the opposite problem, with water agencies pulling their supply from overtaxed underground aquifers which are slow to refill and slow to diminish. Access to water supply sources outside the region are nonexistent. ... ”  Read more from the Santa Cruz Sentinel here:  Santa Cruz: Impacts of water projects under review county-wide

Captain’s Log: Cachuma Lake critters get a boost:  “A boost for wildlife was deployed in Cachuma Lake over the weekend by Fish Reef Project (FRP), after a permitting process that involved the state of California, Santa Barbara County and the federal Bureau of Reclamation.  Two large Fish Reef units were deployed in an area where fish tend to congregate, and lake visitors like to go wet a line and enjoy the gorgeous county park. Trust me, if you are not a regular visitor to Cachuma Lake, you should be. ... ”  Read more from Noozhawk here:  Captain’s Log: Cachuma Lake critters get a boost

A Coachella Valley Water District candidate tries to tip the balance of the board away from farmers. Here’s why: “The election for the District 3 seat on the Coachella Valley Water District board could be pivotal for the agency’s future as a challenger works to unseat the current board president, potentially tilting the balance of power away from large agricultural landowners.  Ed Muzik, general manager of the Hi-Desert Water District in Yucca Valley, has tried to unseat incumbent John Powell Jr., one of three farmers on the water board, with claims that he is the “non-conflicted” candidate in the race.  … ”  Read more from the Desert Sun here:  A Coachella Valley Water District candidate tries to tip the balance of the board away from farmers. Here’s why

Along the Colorado River …

Colorado River drought plan jeopardized by Pinal County water battle:  “The gap between Pinal County farmers and the Gila River Indians over how to protect the Colorado River and Lake Mead is far wider than the interstate highway separating their communities.  Farmers Dan Thelander and Cindi Pearson grow cotton, alfalfa, grains, melons and other crops on fields amidst a bevy of dairies, cattle feedlots and small towns west of Interstate 10 and south of Casa Grande. … ”  Read more from the Arizona Daily Star here:  Colorado River drought plan jeopardized by Pinal County water battle

Arizona: Governor’s Office immersed in drought talks, water policy do-over: Gov. Doug Ducey is all in on Arizona efforts to stabilize water levels in Lake Mead.  The governor and his staff are playing an integral role in bringing Arizona water interests together to reach an internal state agreement on the drought-contingency plan.  The Governor’s Office’s heavy involvement in the process comes after Ducey had high aspirations of making strides on water policy during the 2018 legislative session, but his push for far-reaching water reform quickly dried up. ... ”  Read more from the Arizona Capital Times here:  Arizona: Governor’s Office immersed in drought talks, water policy do-over

E. coli still haunts desert romaine lettuce season along Colorado River: Lettuce growers in the desert valleys of the U.S. Southwest will face more federal scrutiny during the winter growing season, in hope of preventing the type of contamination with E. coli bacteria that killed five people and sickened 205 others this year.  The Food and Drug Administration for the first time will routinely test samples of romaine coming from the lower Colorado River area in Arizona and California, which will begin its harvest this month and continue through April. ... ”  Read more from the Denver Post here: E. coli still haunts desert romaine lettuce season along Colorado River

And lastly …

Watch NASA release 450,000 gallons of water in under a minute …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

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