DAILY DIGEST: Threatened spring-run salmon are sparse this year; Ten years of fighting invasive aquatic species at Lake Tahoe; High stakes for environmental law as new term launches; and more …

In California water news today, Threatened spring-run salmon are sparse this year; Ten years of fighting invasive aquatic species at Lake Tahoe; Public input needed for future of Paso Robles groundwater basin; Proposals for bay restoration leave Long Beach breakwater removal uncertain; High stakes for environmental law as new term launches

On the calendar today …

  • A free webinar: Rivers in the Sky from 12pm to 1pm: Join Scripps Institution of Oceanography meteorologist Marty Ralph, Director of the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes as he describes the phenomena of atmospheric rivers, their impact on our weather, and the essential role modeling and prediction play in managing California’s precious water resources. Click here for more information and to register.

In the news today …

Threatened spring-run salmon are sparse this year:  “The rare spring-run chinook salmon is rarer than usual this year, according to counts in the three streams that support the bulk of the wild fish left in the Sacramento River system.  In Butte Creek, a snorkel survey counted 2,118 fish this year, according to Colin Purdy, who supervises the count for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. That’s less than half the average since 1989 of 4,427 fish.  “It is low unfortunately,” he said, “but it’s better than last year.” … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  Threatened spring-run salmon are sparse this year

Ten years of fighting invasive aquatic species at Lake Tahoe:  “This year marks the 10th anniversary of Lake Tahoe’s Watercraft Inspection Program, according to a release.  Under the program, every motorized watercraft is inspected to ensure it is clean, drained and dry and not carrying aquatic invasive species before launching at Tahoe. No new aquatic invasive species have been detected in Lake Tahoe since the program began 10 years ago.  Of the nearly 8,000 vessels watercraft inspectors examined this boating season, 44 percent of them arrived clean, drained, and dry. Eleven watercraft were found carrying invasive mussels and 40 were harboring other species. … ”  Read more from The Union here:  Ten years of fighting invasive aquatic species at Lake Tahoe

Public input needed for future of Paso Robles groundwater basin:  “The Paso Robles Groundwater Basin is critically over-drafted and county leaders continue to work on a plan to fix that.  So far, water experts and district leaders have drafted 5 out of 13 chapters of the state-mandated Groundwater Sustainability Plan. They need to submit the full plan to the state by Jan. 31, 2020.  In the meantime, they’re looking for public comment. … ”  Read more from KSBY here:  Public input needed for future of Paso Robles groundwater basin

Proposals for bay restoration leave Long Beach breakwater removal uncertain:  “Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia unveiled Monday six alternatives for improving marine habitat in the east San Pedro Bay, but it remains uncertain whether the joint city-Army Corps of Engineers final plan will include removing any of the Long Beach Breakwater.  The $3-million study stems from a push begun 22 years ago by activists seeking to remove the 2.5-mile rock structure and return surfing to the area.  But four of the proposals announced Monday would leave the breakwater in its current configuration, focusing instead on building rock reefs, kelp beds, eel grass and coastal wetlands. … ”  Read more from the OC Register here:  Proposals for bay restoration leave Long Beach breakwater removal uncertain

High stakes for environmental law as new term launches:  “While a maelstrom of controversy surrounds President Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court, the sitting justices are preparing for a new term.  It’ll be a busy year.  The high court’s agenda so far is heavy on cases with big implications for environmental policy. The justices will kick off their term next week with a Monday morning showdown over the Endangered Species Act.  “This term is going to be more of a blockbuster, clearly, than last term in terms of environmental and energy law,” University of Colorado law professor Sharon Jacobs said. … ”  Read more from E&E News here:  High stakes for environmental law as new term launches

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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