NEWS WORTH NOTING: Delta Stewardship Council Members recuse themselves from California Water Fix appeal hearing; Report: An assessment of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act for municipal water suppliers; Weekly water and climate report: Hurricane Florence breaks rainfall records

Delta Stewardship Council Members recuse themselves from California Water Fix appeal hearing

From the Delta Stewardship Council (via email):

The Delta Stewardship Council (Council) has the following announcements related to the appeals proceedings regarding the Certification of Consistency for California Water Fix (Certification No. C20185).

Council Member Susan Tatayon has recused herself from the California Water Fix appeals proceedings because she has identified a potential conflict of interest.  Her spouse works for a firm that has submitted a bid to work on a part of the WaterFix project.  As long as that potential conflict exists, she will not take part in the consideration of any of the appeals, and will be subject to an ethical wall that will prevent her from discussing WaterFix with councilmembers or staff.

Council Member Maria Mehranian has recused herself from the California WaterFix appeals process because she has identified a potential conflict of interest.  She works for a firm that has submitted a bid to work on a part of the WaterFix project.  As long as that potential conflict exists, she will not take part in the consideration of any of the appeals, and will be subject to an ethical wall that will prevent her from discussing WaterFix with councilmembers or staff.

At the August 23, 2018, Council meeting, Council Member Ken Weinberg announced his recusal from the California Water Fix proceedings because of a conflict of interest with respect to his consulting work for local waer supply projects that are intended to reduce reliance from the Delta.  He will not take part in the consideration of any of the appeals, and will be subject to an ethical wall that will prevent him from discussing WaterFix with councilmembers or staff.

Report: An Assessment of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act for Municipal Water Suppliers

From Brownstein Hyatt Farber Shreck:

The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (“SGMA”) is now in its fourth year of operation. Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (“GSAs”) have been formed throughout the medium- and high-priority basins across California, and those GSAs are now developing Groundwater Sustainability Plans (“GSP”). The GSPs will ultimately afford greater long-term groundwater supply reliability by avoiding chronic groundwaer depletion and other “undesirable results,” such as signficant loss of storage, water quality degradation, subsidence, and seawater intrusion.

To achieve sustainable management in basins experiencing pronounced overdraft conditions, either augmented recharge will be necessary or groundwater extractions will need to be reduced over time.  This process will affect municipal water suppliers that rely on groundwater basins that are subject to SGMA’s provision.  It is, thus, important that municipal water suppliers understand the requirements of SGMA, the potential impacts to their groundwater supplies, and the procedural and substantive options and strategies that should be considered throughout the process.

To that effect, this paper will cover:

1. An overview of SGMA and its essential provisions;
2. The issues that will need to be resolved to implement SGMA, including the potential
division of available water supplies within a basin;
3. A summary of key groundwater rights laws;
4. A discussion of groundwater basin adjudications and new laws designed to
streamline future adjudications and harmonize their results with SGMA; and
5. Strategies that municipal water providers may employ to optimize outcomes from
the SGMA/adjudication process.

Click here to read this report from Brownstein Hyatt Farber Shreck.

Weekly water and climate report: Hurricane Florence breaks rainfall records in the Carolinas

“The Natural Resources Conservation Service produces this weekly report using data and products from the National Water and Climate Center and other agencies. The report focuses on seasonal snowpack, precipitation, temperature, and drought conditions in the U.S.

The impact of Hurricane Florence continues along coastal North Carolina and northern South Carolina.  Wind and heavy rain hammered the state for days, as the storm moved slowly inland.  The highest rainfall amounts were 30–50 inches in Wilmington, 20-30 inches in Morehead, and 15-20 inches in a wider area.  Flooding in the area is historic and rivers are continuing to rise, with evacuations still in place, damage mounting, and many roads closed. Agricultural operations were especially hard hit in the area.”

Click here to read the report.

 

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About News Worth Noting:  News Worth Noting is a collection of press releases, media statements, and other materials produced by federal, state, and local government agencies, water agencies, and academic institutions, as well as non-profit and advocacy organizations.  News Worth Noting also includes relevant legislator statements and environmental policy and legal analyses that are publicly released by law firms.  If your agency or organization has an item you would like included here, please email it to Maven.

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