BLOG ROUND-UP: Science, the Delta, and the future of San Joaquin salmon; Water grabs of California, explained simply; A compromise on flows plan; Climate change and adaptive management; Conserving freshwater ecosystems; and more …

Lonesome Duck by Bill Gracey

blog-round-up-previous-editionsScience, the Delta, and the future of San Joaquin salmon:  Dr. Peter Moyle writes, “I feel fortunate to be a biologist in an era and place, California, where science matters. Routine scientific studies rarely make headlines but they are relied on by decision makers because they reduce uncertainty, bit by bit. This seems to be true nationwide as well, except in the highest levels of the federal government. There, scientific findings on such subjects as climate change, evolution of disease organisms, and the importance of ecosystems to human health can be discarded because they contradict traditional ignorance (“gut feelings”) or because they are somehow part of some mystical conspiracy (“deep state”). I therefore think it is worthwhile to give an example of how typical scientific studies, even studies from outside the state, provide important information that can benefit all of us in California. … ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here:  Science, the Delta, and the future of San Joaquin salmon

Restore the Delta responds to Dr. Moyle’s blog post, says it ‘misses the mark’: With all eyes and ears in California water fixated on the State Water Resources Control Board’s proposed updates to the Water Quality Control Plan for the Bay-Delta, Delta stakeholders from all sides have offered their opinions on how to manage San Joaquin River inflow in recent weeks.  Fish biologist Dr. Peter Moyle shares five articles from the June 2018 issue of the North American Journal of Fisheries Management (NAJFM) in a recent post on the California Water Blog, titled, “Science, the Delta, and the future of San Joaquin salmon,” and concludes with his interpretation of what these studies could mean.  Policy Analyst for Restore the Delta, Tim Stroshane critiqued Dr. Moyle’s interpretations … “Continue reading at Restore the Delta here:  Dr. Peter Moyle’s Blog on the Future of San Joaquin Salmon Misses the Mark

Interior secretary sets September 1st deadline for new Central Valley water policies:  “The long-expected showdown between the Trump administration and the state of California over water, farmers and the Central Valley appears to be imminent. On. Aug. 17, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke issued a memorandum declaring his staff had 15 days to draft a plan that would increase water for the region’s agricultural industry by reinterpreting relevant federal policies and laws and by targeting “unacceptable conditions” advocated by the state of California. … ”  Read more from the Cal Watchdog blog here:  Interior secretary sets September 1st deadline for new Central Valley water policies

Water grabs of California, explained simply:  “Your water use is a “grab” and a “waste.” My water use is a nab, and a sacred right. We all see water the same way, mostly, but from different perspectives. ... ”  Read more from the California Water Blog here:  Water grabs of California, explained simply

State Water Board ‘kicks can’ on river decision until November:  Todd Fitchette writes, “Earlier this week a water rally spearheaded by a California assemblyman drew an estimated 1,000 people to the north steps of the State Capitol. Not coincidentally, the event fell one day before the State Water Resources Control Board was set to take over one million acre feet of water from three California rivers for fish restoration in the Delta.  Since it’s been reported that a similar amount of water may be sent to southern California through the proposed twin tunnels that Gov. Brown wants to build, and Metropolitan Water District agreed to help fund, one can rightly say that the move is simply a shell-game akin to games the Legislature pays with new special taxes said to augment General Fund contributions to help fund things like roads and schools, but I digress. … ”  Read more from the Western Farm Press here:  State Water Board ‘kicks can’ on river decision until November

A Compromise Plan is Achievable if All Sides Come to the Table: “The heat of the Sacramento summer has also seen a lot of heated water debate, topped off by two days of contentious hearings on a proposal by the State Water Resources Board. If implemented, Phase I of this policy, which is aimed at the San Joaquin River and its tributaries, would subtract 350,000 acre-feet of water yearly from the amount available to Californians – that’s enough to irrigate over 100,000 acres of farmland or meet the domestic needs of 2 million people for a year. And that’s just the beginning. Phase II heads north into the Sacramento Valley, expanding the impact of this misguided policy to hundreds of thousands of additional acres and millions of acre-feet of water. ... ”  Read more from the California Farm Water Coalition here:  A Compromise Plan is Achievable if All Sides Come to the Table

Climate change will force us to make tough decisions.  Adaptive management can help:  “In the face of climate change, it can be difficult to balance environmental, economic and community needs, but it’s a challenge we must overcome to adapt, survive and thrive.  To do this, professionals from multiple sectors across the globe are increasingly incorporating adaptive management techniques into resource planning for all kinds of essential ecosystems – from major watersheds like the Mississippi River Delta to high food production regions like the Corn Belt.  The lessons learned from past management decisions in these places will help shape resilience strategies for communities and industries around the world as they prepare for a new normal. ... ” Read more from EDF’s Growing Returns blog here:  Climate change will force us to make tough decisions.  Adaptive management can help

Q&A: Conserving freshwater ecosystems as they change: Faith Kearns writes, “Albert Ruhi is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at UC Berkeley.  Q: You are new to UC Berkeley. Can you tell us a little bit about your background?  A: Sure! I’m a freshwater ecologist and study how animal communities respond to hydrologic variability and drought. I am from Catalonia region of Spain, and studied biology and got my Ph.D. at the University of Girona. During my graduate work, I had the opportunity to visit the University of Georgia and had an incredible time exploring swamps and collecting bugs in Carolinas’ bays. After a short postdoc at the Catalan Institute for Water Research, I came back to the U.S. and started a postdoc at Arizona State University. Finally, just before coming to Berkeley, I was a fellow at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC). … ”  Read more from The Confluence blog here:  Q&A: Conserving freshwater ecosystems as they change

A path forward to restore safe drinking water:  The NorCal Water Association blog writes, “The California Urban Water Agencies (CUWA) recently prepared a very thoughtful briefing report on Restoring Water Accessibility in California that is worth review and consideration by policy makers. The theme for the report is that “We Can Act NOW to Restore Safe and Reliable Drinking Water to Californians.” With more than a hundred thousand Californians who are receiving drinking water from failing systems, CUWA and many other entities have studied the challenges of these systems.  While the State assesses funding options, CUWA believes that we can all make immediate progress by informing and advancing new technical and institutional solutions. … ”  Read more from the NCWA blog here:  A path forward to restore safe drinking water

Connecting water systems for safe drinking waterDarcy Bostic and Caitrin Chappelle write,Although most Californians have safe drinking water supplies, pockets of unsafe or inadequate water remain in parts of the state. Persistent water quality challenges mostly affect smaller, economically disadvantaged rural communities. About 90% of the affected water systems distribute water to fewer than 3,300 people each; most are very small, serving fewer than 500 people. Some small communities also face water shortages because their wells went dry during the latest drought. Solutions are financially out of reach for many poor communities, which lack resources and economies of scale to pay for expensive new treatment and supply facilities. … ”  Read more from the PPIC Blog here:  Connecting water systems for safe drinking water

Exploring the relationship between emotions and water issues:  “Parisa Parsafar is a doctoral candidate in Developmental Psychology at UC Riverside. Her work focuses on how children’s experiences and management of negative emotions relate to differences in attention, memory, and learning.  Q: You have recently written about the links between asthma and mental health in the Salton Sea area. Can you tell us a little more about that work? A: Dust from the Salton Sea gets picked up by winds and distributed throughout the region, exacerbating air pollution problems. Salton Sea dust emissions are thought to contribute to the high asthma rates in the area, and this link between emissions and physical health has received a lot of attention. However, I was surprised to find that little had been written about the potential mental health consequences of the pollution, despite well-established connections between asthma and mental health problems. I wanted to bring attention to this issue so that it can be addressed as part of a comprehensive public health program. … ”  Read more from The Confluence blog here:  Exploring the relationship between emotions and water issues

Daily emails

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post!

Sign up for daily emails and get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. Breaking news alerts, too. Sign me up!


About the Blog Round-up: The Blog Round-up is a weekly journey through the wild and varied tapestry of blog commentary, incorporating the good, the bad, the ugly, and sometimes just plain bizarre viewpoints existing on the internet. Viewpoints expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily my own; inclusion of items here does not imply my endorsement of their positions. Items are chosen to express a wide range of viewpoints, and are added at the editor’s discretion. While posts with obvious factual errors are excluded, please note that no attempt is made on my part to verify or fact check the information bloggers present, so caveat emptor – let the buyer beware.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: