DAILY DIGEST: How much water do coho salmon need? Researchers find surprising answer; A beach behind lock and key is turning into a fight over social justice; San Francisco to expand incentives for recycled non-potable use; and more …

In California water news today, How much water do coho salmon need? Researchers find surprising answer; A beach behind lock and key is turning into a fight over social justice in California; San Francisco to expand incentives for recycled non-potable use in smaller buildings, breweries; Cal Am desal project in ‘home stretch’ at CPUC; Ventura moves to increase and diversify its water supply; All-time high temperature records set throughout Southern California, including Los Angeles; Falling Lake Mead water levels prompt detente in Arizona feud; EPA: Enviros bullish as legal wars move from style to substance

In the news today …

How much water do coho salmon need? Researchers find surprising answer:  “In California’s small coastal streams, where hundreds of thousands of Coho salmon once returned each year to spawn, most wild populations now barely cling to survival. Habitat loss and intensive water use have pushed them to the brink; now climate change and increasing competition for water resources could send them over the edge.  However, recent research offers some encouraging findings – that juveniles of Coho salmon, an endangered species in California, can survive in creeks where just a trickle of water remains flowing. Since Coho spend their entire first year in fresh water before heading for the sea, it’s critical that their creeks don’t dry out in the summer. ... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  How much water do coho salmon need? Researchers find surprising answer

A beach behind lock and key is turning into a fight over social justice in California:  “Tucked along a stretch of famous surf breaks and crowded beaches, down a winding road dotted with multimillion-dollar homes, a wrought-iron gate guards this little community’s not-so-secret secret.  Locals call it Privates Beach, though technically it’s a county park. A “gate ambassador” — or security guard, depending on which side you’re on — greets the regulars of Opal Cliff Drive. All are welcome, they say, with a $100 gate key that can be purchased each year at a family-run surf shop. Proceeds go toward keeping the beach safe and clean.  Many out-of-towners don’t bother because they can’t justify the cost as a visitor. Others find the area intimidating. ... ”  Read more from the LA Times here:  A beach behind lock and key is turning into a fight over social justice in California

San Francisco to expand incentives for recycled non-potable use in smaller buildings, breweries:  “In 2012, San Francisco began regulating onsite non-potable water systems in buildings and later required them in new construction.  Today, there are 80 such systems operating or under development that will save a combined 89 million gallons of drinking water annually. By comparison, San Francisco residents use around 65 million gallons of potable water each day. To boost this water conservation effort, which grew in popularity during the last California drought, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is voting Tuesday on a proposal to expand its grant incentive program for building owners to install non-potable water systems to include smaller buildings and also to breweries. … ”  Read more from the San Francisco Examiner here:  San Francisco to expand incentives for recycled non-potable use in smaller buildings, breweries

Cal Am desal project in ‘home stretch’ at CPUC:  “More than six years after being formally proposed to the state Public Utilities Commission, California American Water’s desalination project is in crunch time.  A CPUC proposed decision on the proposal is less than a month away. It will be a precursor to the commission’s consideration of project permit approval and certification of the project’s environmental impact document, likely to occur some time in September just before a critical Carmel River cutback order milestone deadline.  All this as Cal Am faces a second public takeover campaign and ballot measure led by Public Water Now this summer and fall. … ”  Read more from the Monterey Herald here:  Cal Am desal project in ‘home stretch’ at CPUC

Ventura moves to increase and diversify its water supply:  “To increase its water supply and ensure it has sufficient backup during times of trouble, Ventura has been moving toward connecting to the State Water Project and embarking on a large-scale recycling system.  On Monday, the City Council will hear an update on both projects.  The council also will be voting on whether to proceed with a water project that is both costly and relatively untested. … ”  Read more from the Ventura County Star here:  Ventura moves to increase and diversify its water summary

All-time high temperature records set throughout Southern California, including Los Angeles:  “As predicted, new daily, monthly and all-time record highs were set throughout Southern California on Friday because of a monster heat dome sprawled over the region.  The temperature at UCLA soared to 111 degrees, the hottest ever recorded there, surpassing the previous record of 109 degrees, set Sept. 20, 1939, the National Weather Service reported. Records at UCLA date back to 1933.  While the temperature at UCLA set an all-time record, the high in downtown Los Angeles, 108 degrees, fell short of its all-time mark of 113 from September 2010. Still, the 108-degree reading crushed the July 6 daily record of 94, set in 1992. … ”  Read more from the Washington Post here:  All-time high temperature records set throughout Southern California, including Los Angeles

Falling Lake Mead water levels prompt detente in Arizona feud:  “Arizona is the odd state out in agreeing to dramatically curtail water use from the Colorado River, raising tensions in the Southwest as extreme drought conditions return.  At issue are falling water levels at the West’s biggest reservoir, Lake Mead. Having already dropped by more than 150 feet over the past two decades to 1,077 feet, the Nevada reservoir is two feet shy of falling below a federal threshold that can trigger mandatory cutbacks by U.S. officials.  Nevada, California—and Mexico—have mostly agreed to a regional Drought Contingency Plan that would adopt more reductions in the amount of water drawn from the river. But bureaucratic infighting between two Arizona agencies had delayed adoption of the plan. … ” Read more from the Wall Street Journal here:  Falling Lake Mead water levels prompt detente in Arizona feud

EPA: Enviros bullish as legal wars move from style to substance:  “With Scott Pruitt out at EPA, many agency watchers have cautioned that his successor may be more skillful at rolling back environmental safeguards.  Environmentalists and even some industry lawyers have long criticized Pruitt for cutting corners while rolling back rules. That made him an easy target in the courtroom, prompting numerous judicial rebukes for procedural missteps he directed over the past year.  A more careful approach to deregulation from acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler or a future appointee could mean fewer legal hiccups for EPA. ... ”  Read more from E&E News here:  EPA: Enviros bullish as legal wars move from style to substance

More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

(Visited 766 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply