DAILY DIGEST: It’s back: El Niño expected later this year, forecasters say; Many coastal properties could be flooded out by 2045, climate report warns; Senate faces test as energy-water bill hits the floor; Colorado River reservoirs headed to a historic low; and more …

In California water news today, It’s back: El Niño expected later this year, forecasters say; Oroville almost triples state water saving rate; Decades-old project to raise Lake Mendocino dam gets a boost; Could West Sacramento be forced to pay up if the river floods? Mayor and the residents disagree; Desaulnier, Harris, Feinstein introduce bill to give Contra Costa Canal to water district; EPA moves toward rewriting Obama water rule; Colorado River reservoirs expected to be less than half full, headed to a historic low; and more …

In the news today …

It’s back: El Niño expected later this year, forecasters say:  “Climate troublemaker El Niño is forecast for this coming fall and winter, the Climate Prediction Center announced Thursday. The agency said there’s a 65 percent chance it will form by the winter, prompting it to issue an El Niño watch.  In the U.S., a strong El Niño can result in a stormy winter along the West Coast, a wet winter across the South and a warmer-than-average winter in the Pacific Northwest and northern Rocky Mountains. … ”  Read more from the ABC 10 here:  It’s back: El Nino expected later this year, forecasters say

Many coastal properties could be flooded out by 2045, climate report warns:  “That oceanfront property in Stinson Beach you’ve dreamed about may not be so perfect after all.  A report published Monday finds that nearly 4,400 homes in Marin County might not make it beyond a 30-year mortgage because of encroaching seawater.  According to the publication by the Union of Concerned Scientists, Marin County leads the state in the number of parcels that could literally be underwater by 2045 because of climate-driven sea level rise. Across California, more than 20,000 homes are at risk. … ”  Read more from the SF Chronicle here:  Many coastal properties could be flooded out by 2045, climate report warns

Oroville almost triples state water saving rate:  “Water conservation took a dip in April statewide, but locally the numbers were much stronger.  Oroville saved water at almost three times the statewide rate in April, with Chico and Paradise more than doubling it, according to numbers released last week by the state Water Resources Control Board.  The water board said savings averaging 19.6 percent were reported in April by the state’s larger urban water providers. That’s compared to the benchmark year of 2013, which is considered before the drought. ... ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  Oroville almost triples state water saving rate

Decades-old project to raise Lake Mendocino dam gets a boost:  “In early 2014, after fewer than 8 inches of rain had fallen in the upper reaches of the Russian River the previous year, Lake Mendocino dwindled to a third of its capacity, exposing acres of bare ground, and Mendocino County supervisors declared a drought emergency.  “How many times do we have to knock ourselves on the head before we get it?” then-Supervisor John Pinches asked during the board meeting. “Folks, we’ve got to come up with another water supply.” … ”  Read more from the Santa Rosa Press-Democrat here:  Decades-old project to raise Lake Mendocino dam gets a boost

Could West Sacramento be forced to pay up if the river floods?  Mayor and the residents disagree:  “West Sacramento’s recent decision to accept greater responsibility for maintaining levees and drainage systems along the Sacramento River has some residents worried that the city could be swamped financially if the area floods.  The West Sacramento City Council voted 4-1 last month to begin a process that would convert an independent district in charge of levee management into a subsidiary of West Sacramento, and allow the council to replace the district’s board of directors with appointees or the council members themselves. Reclamation District 900 has operated independently since 1911, managing 13.6 miles of levees that provide flood protection along the Sacramento River. ... ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Could West Sacramento be forced to pay up if the river floods?  Mayor and the residents disagree

Desaulnier, Harris, Feinstein introduce bill to give Contra Costa Canal to water district:  “The Contra Costa Water District is looking to upgrade the 48-mile aqueduct that serves half a million county residents, but to invest millions in the aging system, it first wants to own it.  Last week the state’s U.S. Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris introduced SB 3001 to Congress alongside parallel legislation in the House — HR 6040 — by U.S. Reps. Mark Desaulnier, Mike Thompson and Jerry McNerney. Both bills would transfer ownership of the 80-year-old canal system to the water district. ... ”  Read more from the East Bay Times here:  Desaulnier, Harris, Feinstein introduce bill to give Contra Costa Canal to water district

EPA moves toward rewriting Obama water rule:  “The Trump administration took a major step Friday toward rewriting an Obama administration water pollution rule in a more industry-friendly way.  The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers on Friday sent their proposal to redefine “Waters of the United States” to the White House Office of Management and Budget for review. It is the final step before the agencies can release the proposal for public comment.  The Waters of the United States rule, also dubbed WOTUS, defines which bodies of water are subject to federal jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act. … ” Read more from The Hill here:  EPA moves toward rewriting Obama water rule

Senate faces test as energy-water bill hits the floor:  “Competing Senate proposals to increase energy and water dollars and cut billions in unspent Energy Department funding will test this week whether Congress can expect to move bipartisan spending legislation this year.  The Senate will have a vote early this evening to take up a three-bill package, dubbed a minibus, that contains the $43.7 billion fiscal 2019 energy and water spending. The House passed its $44.7 billion version of the legislation two weeks ago.  Later in the week, the Senate is likely to turn to a more contentious bill that would rescind $14.7 billion in unspent funding from previous years, including $4 billion in cuts from DOE technology loan programs, an effort created by an Obama-era economic recovery package. … ”  Read more from E&E News here:  Senate faces test as energy-water bill hits the floor

Freshwater hotspots around the world are in danger, NASA finds:  “NASA has pinpointed hotspots around the world where freshwater supplies are in danger through one-of-a-kind study using satellites.  Groundwater is a primary source of fresh water in many parts of the world. Some regions are becoming overly dependent on it, consuming groundwater faster than it is naturally replenished and causing water tables to decline unremittingly.  Scientists found this out by combining multiple NASA satellite observations of Earth with data on human activities to map locations where freshwater is changing around the world to determine why. ... ”  Read more from Accu-Weather here:  Freshwater hotspots around the world are in danger, NASA finds

In commentary today …

George Skelton:  Gambling on a California split has its allure, but it’s too much hassle — and a ‘real threat’: “Troublemaker Tim Draper’s latest proposal to split California into three states has some appeal for Northerners. At least it does for me.  That doesn’t mean it’s a smart idea. It’s impractical, a fantasy and doomed. But it does have an allure.  In November, Californians will have an opportunity to vote on whether to split the state in thirds because the venture capitalist’s initiative qualified for the ballot last week. So this is no longer just an idea for idle chit-chat. It’s potentially achievable, if highly remote. ... ”  Continue reading from the LA Times here:  George Skelton:  Gambling on a California split has its allure, but it’s too much hassle — and a ‘real threat’

More news and commentary in the weekend edition …

  • DAILY DIGEST, weekend edition: From dendrometers to drones, devices drive ag-tech boom; Tribe’s salmon protection effort highlighted in new exhibit; EPA fines NorCal gravel miner for dumping on endangered salmon; Bakersfield trees bouncing back after drought; Massive algal bloom at Diamond Valley lake prompts warnings; Reclamation chief revitalizes agency’s infrastructure mission; and more … READ IT HERE:  Weekend Daily Digest

Along the Colorado River …

Colorado River reservoirs expected to be less than half full, headed to a historic low:  “Reservoirs that store water along the Colorado River are projected to be less than half full later this year, potentially marking a historic low mark for the river system that supplies water to seven U.S. states and Mexico.  Forecasters with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation expect the river’s reservoirs — Lakes Mead and Powell among them — to be at a combined 48 percent of capacity by the end of September. That would be one of the lowest points ever for the combined water storage. ... ”  Read more from KPBS here:  Colorado River reservoirs expected to be less than half full, headed to a historic low

Feds want drought contingency plans:  “The commissioner of the federal Bureau of Reclamation wants Colorado River system states to take action this year on drought contingency plans to reduce the risk that Lake Mead will fall below shortage trigger levels.  “As commissioner, I am here to tell you that we absolutely need more action on the Colorado River,” said Bureau Commissioner Brenda Burman in a statement. “The risk we are facing right now is too great.” … ”  Read more from the Mohave Daily News here:  Feds want drought contingency plans

Southern Nevada Water Authority says it can supply water if Las Vegas footprint expands:  “The Southern Nevada Water Authority says it has more than enough water to supply new homes and businesses that could be built one day on thousands of acres of federal land just outside the Las Vegas Valley.  The challenge will be getting the water there and making sure it is used — and reused — as efficiently as possible, said water authority chief John Entsminger.  The Clark County Commission is set to vote Tuesday on a resolution seeking federal legislation to open almost 39,000 acres of public land for sale to developers. … ”  Read more from the Las Vegas Review-Journal here:  Southern Nevada Water Authority says it can supply water if Las Vegas footprint expands

Ancient river could flow again in Tucson, thanks to recycled wastewater:  “Recycled wastewater is gaining wider acceptance to boost drinking water supplies across the arid West. Now a project in Tucson could mark another milestone: The city wants to use recycled effluent largely for ornamental purposes.  Tucson proposes to use a portion of the metro area’s treated urban wastewater to make the Santa Cruz River flow through downtown again for the first time in 70 years. The river once meandered year-round through this Sonoran Desert town. But it has been reduced to a dusty flood-control channel by more than a century of groundwater pumping and development. ... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Ancient river could flow again in Tucson, thanks to recycled wastewater

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

(Visited 985 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply