DAILY DIGEST: Why emergency drought assistance will be needed for years; A little water could make a big difference for salmon; (Literal) eagle eyes on the Oroville Dam spillway; Coyote Creek steelhead trout disappearance prompts battle; and more …

In California water news today, Why emergency drought assistance will be needed for years; A little water could make a big difference for salmon; (Literal) eagle eyes on the Oroville Dam spillway; Humboldt County, state water officials talk new laws that mandate water conservation; Coyote Creek steelhead trout disappearance prompts battle; Senate passes bill to include Arroyo Seco in larger watershed study area; and more …

On the calendar today …

  • The State Water Resources Control Board will meet at 9:30 am. Agenda items include an update on current hydrologic conditions, update on urban water conservation regulations, consideration of adoption of sediment quality provisions for enclosed bays and estuaries, and an informational item on the proposed framework for regulating Direct Potable Reuse.  Click here for the full agenda.
  • The Delta Conservancy is hosting a public workshop to discuss conservation and agricultural sustainability opportunities in the Central Delta Corridor from Sherman Island to the Cosumnes Preserve from 6:00 to 8:30pm at the Jean Harvie Center in Walnut Grove.  For more information, click here.

In the news today …

Why emergency drought assistance will be needed for years:  “Gov. Jerry Brown declared the end of California’s five-year drought in April 2017 after a wet winter replenished shrinking reservoirs. But the lingering impact of the drought, especially on groundwater supplies, means some still rely on emergency water tanks while they wait for long-term solutions.  This is particularly true in the San Joaquin Valley, where more than 300 domestic well users whose taps have run dry continue to use tanks provided by the state through a program originally slated to end in June. ... ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Why emergency drought assistance will be needed for years

A little water could make a big difference for salmon:  “Even small amounts of running water–less than a gallon per second–could mean the difference between life or death for juvenile coho salmon in coastal California streams, according to a new study published in the journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.  The study, led by California Sea Grant Extension Specialist Mariska Obedzinski, shows that during dry periods, that amount of water was enough to keep pools interconnected, allowing young salmon to survive through the hot, dry summer months. … ”  Read more from EurekAlert here:  A little water could make a big difference for salmon

(Literal) eagle eyes on the Oroville Dam spillway:  “Bald eagles booted out of their nest last year during the Oroville Dam spillway crisis have proven to be quite the resilient pair, making a new home for themselves and successfully hatching two little ones.  During the incident last February, the state Department of Water Resources had to reroute powerlines that used to cross the spillway slope. Those lines led to the Hyatt Powerplant, a crucial element for water releases, especially with a damaged spillway. ... ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  (Literal) eagle eyes on the Oroville Dam spillway

Where the candidates for governor stand on the state’s biggest issues:  “Welcome to your guide to some of the key policy positions of six top candidates in California’s race for governor.  The candidates listed have met certain criteria, including: previous election to public office; at least 5% support from likely voters in an independent, established public opinion poll; or demonstrated fundraising ability.  Here’s where they stand. … ” (Water is lightly covered in the last section, Transportation and infrastructure.)   Read more from the LA Times here:  Where the candidates for governor stand on the state’s biggest issues

Californians vote on measure to fund parks, water projects:  “Californians are voting Tuesday on proposals to let the state borrow $4 billion for parks and conservation projects and change how revenues are allocated from its cap-and-trade pollution program.  Voters are heading to the polls to decide on five statewide ballot measures.  Proposition 68 would let California issue general obligation bonds to fund parks and environmental projects, including $200 million to help preserve the state’s largest lake. … ”  Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle here:  Californians vote on measure to fund parks, water projects

And lastly … Is doing laundry and showering on the same day now illegal in California?  Find out here:  The great California laundry and shower meme, from Mother Jones; also Snopes tackles it here:  Is It Now Against the Law in California to Shower and Do Laundry on the Same Day?

In commentary today …

This is California. We should be able to drink the water. Lawmakers, fix this disgrace, says the Sacramento Bee:  They write, “In the world’s fifth largest economy, in the richest state in the richest nation, some 360,000 Californians have water that is unsafe to drink.  That’s the equivalent of about three and a half Flint, Michigans, and it’s an outrage. Worse, it’s a fixable outrage, and the fix is being blocked by vested interests. This stalemate has gone on for more than a year now at the state Capitol while vulnerable families, many of them in the Central Valley, have lived as if this is a Third World country. Enough is enough. Let’s deal with this. … ”  Continue reading at the Sacramento Bee here:  This is California. We should be able to drink the water. Lawmakers, fix this disgrace

In regional news and commentary today …

Humboldt County, state water officials talk new laws that mandate water conservation:  “Although he declared an end to California’s historic five-year drought last year, Gov. Jerry Brown has signed two new laws that will require cities and water districts across the state to set permanent water conservation rules, even in non-drought years.  “In preparation for the next drought and our changing environment, we must use our precious resources wisely,” Brown said in a statement. “We have efficiency goals for energy and cars — and now we have them for water.” … ”  Read more from the Eureka Times-Standard here:  Humboldt County, state water officials talk new laws that mandate water conservation

Coyote Creek steelhead trout disappearance prompts battle:  ” … A less vocal and sometimes unrepresented stakeholder in this struggle: the environment and local wildlife under threat. The endangered steelhead trout, however, is not going unrepresented; a coalition of environmental activists, including the Sierra Club and the Santa Clara County Creeks Coalition have filed a Water Rights Complaint with the California State Water Resources Control Board to use their water licensing powers to require action by the Santa Clara Valley Water District to protect these fish. The changes, if they were implemented, would represent a change in water management on the part of the Santa Clara Valley Water District—one that environmentalists say is necessary to avoid the extinction of the steelhead in local rivers. … ”  Read more from Environmental Monitor here:  Coyote Creek steelhead trout disappearance prompts battle

Ventura considers water supplies:  “Reflecting the city’s limited water supply, coupled with the ongoing drought, Ventura should continue to stay in a Stage 3 Water Shortage Event.  That’s the recommendation Ventura Water General Manager Kevin Brown will make to the City Council on Monday night. If they approve it, elected officials will be confirming that the city’s water supply remains well below what used to be considered normal or typical conditions. ... ”  Read more from the Ventura County Star here:  Ventura considers water supplies

Senate passes bill to include Arroyo Seco in larger watershed study area:  “The passage of a California Senate bill advances the cause of including the Arroyo Seco Tributary into a larger watershed study in light of ongoing drought conditions.  The bill, SB 1126, authored by Pasadena-area Sen. Anthony J. Portantino, is designed to include the Arroyo Seco Tributary in the Upper Los Angeles River and Tributaries Working Group plan.  The measure passed unanimously on Thursday, May 31, with 39 state senators voting for adoption. ... ”  Read more from Pasadena Now here:  Senate passes bill to include Arroyo Seco in larger watershed study area

Dana Point desal project touts no significant impacts:  “Plans for an ocean desalination plant in Dana Point are moving forward with the recent release of a draft Environmental Impact Report and an upcoming public meeting to review the report’s findings, which state that if built, the project will not have any “unavoidable significant environmental impacts.”  South Coast Water District, which provides water to several south-county cities and some Laguna Beach residents, released the draft report for the Doheny Ocean Desalination Project on May 23, which begins a 60-day public review period. The analysis evaluates the possible environmental impacts of producing desalinated drinking water. ... ”  Read more from the Laguna Beach Independent here:  Dana Point desal project touts no significant impacts

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

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