SCIENCE NEWS: Putah Creek: A mighty confluence of events creates a model stream; Want to fight sea level rise? Look to San Francisco’s Ocean Beach; Creating habitat in a drawn-down lake; Odds of reaching 100% normal precipitation for WY2018; and more …

Sunrise at Barrow Atmospheric Observatory (NOAA)

In science news this week: Putah Creek: A mighty confluence of events creates a model stream; Want to fight sea level rise? Look to San Francisco’s Ocean Beach; Disparities in coastal stream restoration in Central California; Creating habitat in a drawn-down lake; Odds of reaching 100% normal precipitation for water year 2018; Extreme climate variability disrupting West Coast ecosystems; Even moderate hypoxia may threaten many species

Putah Creek: A mighty confluence of events creates a model stream:  “A recent study from researchers at the University of California, Davis presents the case of what is now a model stream: the Putah Creek. Nestled in its own riparian reserve just a few miles from campus, the creek is an idyllic habitat for birds, fish, benthic species, and other denizens of the stream—but it wasn’t always.  In 1999, the stream had disappeared, leaving a dry channel behind. The wildlife disappeared with the stream, and in place of the water and wildlife humans dumped old appliances and garbage. Then, in 2000, things changed course, and what researcher Melanie Truan calls a “mighty confluence of events” led to the stream’s return and the ultimate restoration of the ecosystem. … ” Read more from Environmental Monitor here:  Putah Creek: A mighty confluence of events creates a model stream

Want to fight sea level rise? Look to San Francisco’s Ocean Beach:  “Most mornings when I step out of my San Francisco apartment, I hear the waves, the seagulls, and occasionally kids yelling out the window across the street. But over the past few weeks, the murmur of Ocean Beach has been cut with a low mechanistic rumble. Walk a few blocks and pop your head over the sand dunes and you’ll find the culprits: orange-yellow tractors piling sand into dump trucks, which caravan three miles south and spit out the sand—50,000 cubic yards, or 75,000 tons, of it in total—back on the beach. … ”  Read more from WIRED Magazine here:  Want to fight sea level rise? Look to San Francisco’s Ocean Beach

Disparities in coastal stream restoration in Central California:  “Stream restoration efforts along the coast of Central California are unevenly distributed, with activity more likely to occur in areas that are more highly populated and dominated by residents who are “whiter, wealthier, and more educated,” according to an analysis by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  In addition, coastal stream restoration is heavily concentrated in Santa Cruz, Morro Bay, and southern Santa Barbara County, creating “restoration deserts” with virtually no activity, said lead author Bronwen Stanford, a doctoral candidate in environmental studies. ... ”  Read more from EurekAlert here:  Disparities in coastal stream restoration in Central California

Creating habitat in a drawn-down lake:  “More than a decade ago, Southern California freshwater anglers were disappointed to see a tried-and-true fishing spot dramatically affected by an emergency lake drawdown. Due to seismic concerns with the Perris Dam, California Department of Water Resources (DRW) officials deemed it necessary to reduce the water level at Lake Perris near Riverside by several thousands of acre-feet.  The drawdown exposed about 25 feet of bank around the perimeter of the lake. Since water was not going to be available for years while the dam was assessed and repaired, CDFW embarked upon a fisheries habitat mitigation project (funded by DWR) to create new fish habitat in the remaining water and the now exposed lakebed. ... ”  Read more from the Department of Fish and Wildlife here:  Creating habitat in a drawn-down lake

Odds of reaching 100% normal precipitation for water year 2018Mike Dettinger runs it down here.

Extreme climate variability disrupting West Coast ecosystems:  “New research shows that extreme climate variability over the last century in western North America may be destabilizing both marine and terrestrial ecosystems.  Climate is increasingly controlling synchronous ecosystem behavior in which species populations rise and fall together, according to the National Science Foundation-funded study published in the journal Global Change Biology. ... ”  Read more from PhysOrg here:  Extreme climate variability disrupting West Coast ecosystems

Even moderate hypoxia may threaten many species:  “In recent times “dead zones” in the world’s oceans have received more attention—and rightly so. These hypoxic regions, such as the massive dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico next to the Mississippi River Delta, are characterized by oxygen levels too low to support marine life. However, new research from Plymouth University scientists reveals that even moderately hypoxic areas that are not yet dead zones threaten various marine species.  Lecturer in Marine Molecular Biology Dr. Manuela Truebano corresponded with EM about the research. … ”  Read more from Environmental Monitor here:  Even moderate hypoxia may threaten many species

Maven’s XKCD Comic Pick of the Week …

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About Science News and Reports: This weekly feature, posted every Thursday, is a collection of the latest scientific research and reports with a focus on relevant issues to the Delta and to California water, although other issues such as climate change are sometimes included. Do you have an item to be included here? Submissions of relevant research and other materials is welcome. Email Maven

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