DAILY DIGEST: Pressure mounts on Cal Water Fix agencies; A ‘floating fillet:’ Rice farmers grow bugs to replenish California salmon; First rising tides, now sinking shores: Study finds new trouble for Bay Area; Pacific storms to bring more rain and snow; and more …

In California water news today, Pressure mounts on Cal Water Fix agencies; A ‘floating fillet:’ Rice farmers grow bugs to replenish California salmon; State water savings dip close to zero during January; Winnemem chief Caleen Sisk to run for state Assembly; Recycled water from sewers coming to California taps; First rising tides, now sinking shores: Study finds new trouble for Bay Area; Las Vegas considering Pacific Coast desalination plant in the future; and more …

On the calendar today …

  • This evening, Karen Ross is speaking at the meeting of the AWRA NorCal chapter meeting from 6pm to 7:30pm.  You do not need to be a member to attend.  Click here for more information.

In the news today …

Pressure mounts on Cal Water Fix agencies:  “As the clock winds down on Gov. Jerry Brown’s time in office, pressure appears to be mounting on state agencies to move the California WaterFix project forward.  The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD) surprised many during a Bay-Delta Special Committee meeting on Feb. 27 when it was disclosed that the agency was examining the opportunity to finance the $11 billion cost of building the first of two tunnels in accordance with the Department of Water Resource’s (DWR) revised construction plan. The plan would require increased financial commitment from the agency but would also cede greater control of water resources to the agency. That has critics concerned. … ”  Read more from The Press here:  Pressure mounts on Cal Water Fix agencies

A ‘floating fillet:’ Rice farmers grow bugs to replenish California salmon:  “Jacob Katz is on the hunt — not for geese or ducks. On a farm about 40 minutes north of Sacramento, he wades through a rice paddy with an aquarium net in hand. But he’s not fishing.  “We’re going bug hunting,” Katz says.  The senior scientist for California Trout, a conservation group with a focus on protecting wild fish, is at River Garden Farms. Founded in 1913, they typically grow things like corn, wheat and around 5,000 acres of rice — the kind local sushi restaurants use. … ” Read more from NPR here:  A ‘floating fillet:’ Rice farmers grow bugs to replenish California salmon

State water savings dip close to zero during January:  “Water conservation in California has dribbled down to all but nothing as of January, but locally, we’re doing much better.  The State Water Resources Control Board reported Tuesday that statewide water savings were just 0.8 percent in January compared to January 2013, the benchmark pre-drought year.  By comparison, the California Water Service Co. Oroville Division reported a 40.8 percent reduction in water use compared to 2013. That was the seventh best conservation rate in the state. … ”  Read more from the Chico Enterprise-Record here:  State water savings dip close to zero during January

Winnemem chief Caleen Sisk to run for state Assembly:  “Joining a wave of women running for political office, and perhaps becoming the first American Indian woman to run for a state office from Shasta County, Caleen Sisk took out papers to run for state Assembly on Tuesday.  “It is the year of the woman, and a lot of women leaders around the world are stepping forward and taking a place here, and in this county I think we are making history to have a tribal woman step up because we’re from here, we’re from this land,” said Sisk, chief and spiritual leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe. ... ”  Read more from the Record Searchlight here:  Winnemem chief Caleen Sisk to run for state Assembly

Recycled water from sewers coming to California taps:  “Water that once coursed through city sewers may soon find new life coming out of your home faucet.  New regulations approved Tuesday by the California State Water Resources Control Board allow treated recycled water to be added to reservoirs, the source of California municipal drinking water. ... ”  Read more from SF Gate here:  Recycled water from sewers coming to California taps

In commentary today …

Westlands Water – US drainage deal is fair and equitable, says Johnny Amaral:  He writes, “After decades of hearings, reports and public meetings and a comprehensive review by the U.S. Departments of Justice and Interior, as well as the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the United States and the Westlands Water District hammered out a landmark, bipartisan settlement that provides a transparent, fair and equitable solution to a 50-year dispute over the federal government’s responsibility to provide drainage services for Central Valley farmers.It is fair for farmers, who lost the productive use of their land, and for the federal government, which faced liability for the property damage estimated by the Justice Department to be as high as $2 billion. … ”  Read more from the SF Chronicle here:  Westlands Water – US drainage deal is fair and equitable

Despite wet weather, California should prepare for drought, says Jay Lund:  He writes, “Despite recent rain and snow, California is back to dry conditions again after a very wet 2017. With about four weeks left in the normal wet season, the Sacramento Valley is at about 65 percent of average precipitation (less than one-third of last year’s precipitation). The southern Central Valley has less than 50 percent of average precipitation and Southern California is still drier. Snowpack is much less, at 37 percent statewide. Surface reservoirs, which almost all refilled and spilled in record-wet 2017, are now at 98 percent of average for this time of year, and will fall quickly as there is well-below-normal snowpack to melt. … ”  Read more from Water Deeply here:  Despite wet weather, California should prepare for drought

Michael Hiltzik column: Loan to Jared Kushner raises questions about water project:  “Followers of the ecologically dubious and largely pointless Cadiz water project in the Mojave Desert might have pricked up their ears last week at reports of a possible conflict of interest involving Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and the investment firm Apollo Global Management.  That’s because Apollo is a sizable investor in Cadiz, which has received favorable regulatory treatment from the Trump administration after years of thumbs-down rulings under the Obama administration and from local and state officials. Apollo and Cadiz announced the $60-million investment, along with a “conditional” $240 million in construction financing, on May 2. … ”  Read more from the LA Times here:  Michael Hiltzik column: Loan to Jared Kushner raises questions about water project

In regional news and commentary today …

Marin waters: Deadly poison found in shellfish:  “The Marin County Public Health Department has issued a warning to people harvesting mussels, clams and oysters in Marin because of potentially deadly levels of a naturally occurring toxin, paralytic shellfish poison.  On Tuesday, the California Department of Public Health notified Public Health Officer Dr. Matthew Willis and other public health staff in Marin about a recent mussel sample from the Chimney Rock sentinel station, within Point Reyes National Seashore. ... ”  Read more from the Marin Independent Journal here:  Marin waters: Deadly poison found in shellfish

First rising tides, now sinking shores: Study finds new trouble for Bay Area:  “Rising tides aren’t the only problem the Bay Area faces as sea levels climb. Those high waters may advance on a sinking shoreline.  A study published Wednesday finds that flooding along San Francisco Bay could become far worse — sometimes twice as bad as current models suggest — because much of the bayfront is slipping downward at the same time that global warming is driving ocean levels upward. … ”  Read more from SF Gate here:  First rising tides, now sinking shores: Study finds new trouble for Bay Area

Treasure Island is sinking as seas are rising, and so are other Bay Area cities:  “If you imagine the San Francisco Bay as a bathtub, sea level rise means the bathwater is rising. A new study published today in Science Advances finds the tub is sinking too, and in some places, more than others.  Where Bay Area cities have built on landfill or newer mud, that land is compacting, and sinking faster than other places. This subsidence is a problem for, among others, Foster City, Union City, San Rafael, and the land around San Francisco Airport. ... ”  Read more from KQED here:  Treasure Island is sinking as seas are rising, and so are other Bay Area cities

San Francisco to charge vacant lot owners for rainwater that runs down the drain:  “When it rains, it pours — and that has San Francisco water officials looking into charging property owners a new “storm-water fee” to help with the upkeep of the city’s aging sewer system.  The first target will be the owners of vacant lots.  “It’s a tax on rain,” fumed Jason Sanders, who was just notified that effective July 1, he will be assessed $31.46 a month for runoff on his vacant lot on Ashbury Street. … ”  Read more from SF Gate here:  San Francisco to charge vacant lot owners for rainwater that runs down the drain

East Bay: Alternative water projects feasible, but cost is barrier:  “The Tri-Valley Water Liaison Committee heard an update on the feasibility of spreading out the Valley’s potable water source portfolio. The report points the way to create new technical tools to lessen dependency on the State Water Project.  However, the group of four Valley water retailers and Zone 7 Water Agency who met at the Livermore Library March 1 also heard a report on public sentiment about acceptance of various forms of recycled water for the potable supply, and attitudes about paying for it. Those two factors still appear to be the challenge for the water officials. ... ”  Read more from the Livermore Independent here:  East Bay: Alternative water projects feasible, but cost is barrier

Lemoore heads toward solving water problems:  “After a seven-year battle with contaminants, Lemoore is moving toward a solution.  The City of Lemoore’s water has not been in compliance with the state’s drinking water by-products, specifically because of TTHM, standards since 2011.  Currently the city draws water from ten wells. After mixing water  from the wells together and treating the water with chlorine, the combination of the chlorine with natural compounds in the water create TTHM, which is carcinogenic. The city and the state agree that the level of TTHM in the water is still safe to drink, but also want to eliminate it. ... ”  Read more from the Hanford Sentinel here:  Lemoore heads toward solving water problems

San Luis Obispo County considers cloud seeding:  “It’s no secret California officials are always on the lookout to enhance water sources. Here on the Central Coast, some are looking to the sky. San Luis Obispo County is considering a new cloud seeding program water managers hope will increase the local water supply. The county’s hope is to increase precipitation in the Lopez Lake and Salinas Reservoir watersheds during what’s called winter precipitation events. … ”  Read more from KCBX here:  San Luis Obispo County considers cloud seeding

On Paso Robles groundwater, conservative supervisors act like ‘Big Government’ bullies, says the San Luis Obispo Tribune:  They write, “What kind of Orwellian universe is this?  The conservative majority on the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors — to whom private property rights and local control have been sacrosanct — has refused to allow a group of North County landowners to represent themselves in groundwater sustainability planning. … ”  Read more from the San Luis Obispo Tribune here:  On Paso Robles groundwater, conservative supervisors act like ‘Big Government’ bullies

Kern County Water Summit tackles groundwater use, regulation:  “California is the last state in the western U.S. to regulate groundwater use. That topic was on the agenda at Wednesday’s Kern County Water Summit.  Under a state law passed in 2014, all water districts in California must have a plan in place by the year 2020 that shows how they will protect groundwater supplies on a sustained basis, to prevent overdraft of our groundwater basins. … ”  Read more from Kern Golden Empire here: Kern County Water Summit tackles groundwater use, regulation

Long Beach approves $30 million project to capture, clean runoff:  “Drought stricken California needs rain, but when the first downpours of the season happen, it brings large amounts of pollutants from city streets right to the ocean and the beaches of Long Beach. ... ”  Read more from KABC here:  Long Beach approves $30 million project to capture, clean runoff

Along the Colorado River …

Las Vegas considering Pacific Coast desalination plant in the future:  “The population of Southern Nevada and the Las Vegas area could grow to about 3.6 million in 50 years and could spark plans for a desalination plant on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, said John Entsminger, general manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority.  Southern Nevada now has an estimated population of about 2.1 million, according to the UNLV Center for Business and Economic Research. The population jump to 3.6 million people would be big, but not the biggest in Las Vegas history, Entsminger said recently on Nevada Newsmakers. ... ”  Read more from the Reno Gazette Journal here:  Las Vegas considering Pacific Coast desalination plant in the future

Precipitation watch …

Pacific storms to bring more rain and snow to dry California:  “A new Pacific storm will be moving into the Northwest this Wednesday bringing another round of rain and snow to western Washington and Oregon, as well as to sections of northwest California.  Gusty south-southwesterly winds along with high surf will accompany the storm Wednesday night through Thursday afternoon as it rolls into land. ... ”  Read more from the Weather Network here:  Pacific storms to bring more rain and snow to dry California

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

(Visited 758 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply