SCIENCE NEWS: Central Valley soil emissions a large source of California’s nitrogen oxide pollution; Subterranean fish rescue; Can the world find solutions to the nitrogen pollution crisis?; A story of recovery: Bringing back the Southern California steelhead; and more …

Dendritic crystal formation

In science news this week: Central Valley soil emissions a large source of California’s nitrogen oxide pollution; Subterranean fish rescue; Can the world find solutions to the nitrogen pollution crisis?; Coastal cities: Hazard mitigation, recovery plans; Scientists using chemistry to filter silver nanoparticles out of wastewater; Record number of scientists running for office in 2018; A story of recovery: Bringing back the Southern California steelhead

Central Valley soil emissions a large source of California’s nitrogen oxide pollution:  “A previously unrecognized source of nitrogen oxide is contributing up to about 40 percent of the NOx emissions in California, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. The study traces the emissions to fertilized soils in the Central Valley region.  In the study, published January 31 in the journal Science Advances, the authors compared computer models with estimates collected from scientific flights over the San Joaquin Valley. Both the model and flight data suggested that between 25 and 41 percent of NOx emissions comes from soils with heavy nitrogen fertilizer applications. ... ”  Read more from Science Daily here:  Central Valley soil emissions a large source of California’s nitrogen oxide pollution

Subterranean fish rescue:  “We’ll go to great lengths to rescue fish, even when it takes us to unexpected places. When we got a call from the Modesto Irrigation District to remove stranded fish from the Tuolumne River’s north bank tunnel, we knew it would be interesting. The main canal tunnel near the town of La Grange is a 16-ft. diameter concrete pipe that is more than a mile long. Both ends of the pipe travel at a downward angle and meet at a low spot, 1,200 feet from the west entrance. The tunnel, which was undergoing routine maintenance, was mostly drained of water, but some fish were stranded in a pool eight feet deep at the low spot of the canal. … ”  Read more from FishBio here:  Subterranean fish rescue

Can the world find solutions to the nitrogen pollution crisis?  “The world is using nitrogen fertilizer less and less efficiently. A greater proportion than ever before is washing into rivers and oceans. An environmental catastrophe looms, nitrogen scientists say, and the world urgently needs to develop strategies to prevent it.  Post-war physicists fearing nuclear apocalypse came up with the Doomsday Clock. In the 1980s, biologists contemplating ecological meltdown began talking about “biodiversity” loss as a way to tag and measure the crisis. Soon after, climate scientists recast concern over global warming with a warning that within a century it would lead to temperatures greater than any in human history.  Now, it is nitrogen’s turn. … ”  Read more from Yale 360 here:  Can the world find solutions to the nitrogen pollution crisis?

Coastal cities: Hazard mitigation, recovery plans:  “The field of urban planning is gaining interest as cities around the world, including nearby Houston, are facing increased exposure to weather-related risks and hazards ranging from sea level rise and flooding to temperature build-up and urban heat island effect.  Philip Berke, professor of landscape architecture and urban planning at Texas A&M University, recently completed a five-year research project that examined 175 hazard mitigation plans adopted by counties and municipalities along the Gulf of Mexico and the U.S. Atlantic and Pacific Northwest coastlines. These local governments are required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to adopt such plans to be eligible for pre-disaster and post-disaster mitigation funds. … ”  Read more from Science Daily here:  Coastal cities: Hazard mitigation, recovery plans

Scientists using chemistry to filter silver nanoparticles out of wastewater:  “Silver nanoparticles are a kind of miracle additive for anyone who has ever been responsible for laundering the smelly clothing of, for example, active teenagers or athletes. These nanoparticles deliver silver ions that promote lysis, cellular breakdown, making them toxic to the bacteria that cause body odor. This means that clothing laced with silver nanoparticles can be worn by even the sweatiest, smelliest athlete without taking on those odors. ... ”  Read more from Environmental Monitor here:  Scientists using chemistry to filter silver nanoparticles out of wastewater

Record number of scientists running for office in 2018:  “An unprecedented number of candidates with backgrounds in science, technology, engineering, and math are running for United States office this year at both the state and federal level, according to reporting by The Huffington Post. More than 60 people coming from these fields are running for the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in midterm elections this November, and at least 200 others have declared their candidacy for open state legislature seats. … ”  Read more from Yale 360 here:  Record number of scientists running for office in 2018

A story of recovery: Bringing back the Southern California steelhead

Maven’s XKCD Comic Pick of the Week …

 

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About Science News and Reports: This weekly feature, posted every Thursday, is a collection of the latest scientific research and reports with a focus on relevant issues to the Delta and to California water, although other issues such as climate change are sometimes included. Do you have an item to be included here? Submissions of relevant research and other materials is welcome. Email Maven

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