SCIENCE NEWS: Coming together in the name of salmon; Who’s eating who: Trees eat fish too; Trees tell us much about fire: What will we do about it?; Technology week: Exploring the wide range of technologies NOAA uses in its mission; and more …

Courtesy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

In science news this week: Coming together in the name of salmon; Who's eating who: Trees eat fish too; Trees tell us much about fire: What will we do about it?; Wire cages and hard work help prevent extinction of rare native plant; Partnership with state-run Nimbus Hatchery helps correct wayward 2017 fall-run Chinook salmon that strayed off course when they returned to spawn; Scripps Oceanography Receives $3 million NOAA Grant to Help Decisionmakers Prepare for Hazards and Extreme Events; Eyes on the coast: Video cameras help forecast climate change; Technology week: Exploring the wide range of technologies NOAA uses in its mission

Coming together in the name of salmon:  “California may have experienced record rainfalls this past winter, but negative impacts due to the unprecedented five-year statewide drought continue for Chinook salmon produced at the Coleman National Fish Hatchery.  In a unique partnership that hasn’t been utilized in 40 years, the state of California has stepped in to help out.  The Coleman hatchery, located in Anderson, California is the only federally operated fish hatchery in the state with an annual production of 12 million fall-run salmon smolts that are typically released into nearby Battle Creek each spring. This allows them to complete the imprinting cycle during their outmigration to the ocean. … ”  Read more from California Sportsman here:  Coming together in the name of salmon

Who's eating who:  Trees eat fish too:  “The life cycle of a salmon comes full circle when adults migrate upstream from the ocean back to their natal spawning grounds, where they lay their eggs and guard them until they die – that is, if they’re lucky. Alternate endings to this life cycle might be a leaping salmon intercepted by grizzly bears, documentary style, or their carcasses scavenged by wolves. Throughout their evolutionary history, young salmon have traveled to the ocean where they bulk up on krill and other prey rich in nutrients. When adult salmon migrate upriver to spawn, they provide a steady supply of these nutrients from the ocean to predators higher up in the food chain – and even to the trees of the surrounding forests. The salmon lifecycle is deeply intertwined with the nutrient cycle across an entire landscape. … ”  Read more from FishBio here:  Who’s eating who:  Trees eat fish too

Trees tell us much about fire:  What will we do about it?  “In the Pacific Northwest, trees are abundant and wildfire is a constant presence. In fact, the region was beset with monumental wildfires in the summers of 2014, 2015, and 2017.  These days, wildfires are often catastrophic, but historically, fires were integral to a healthy ecosystem. Sparks generated by lightning went untamed. Native Americans also used fire to care for the land.  In the late 1800s, settlements, road-building, and livestock grazing began to impact the region’s forests. Logging removed the most valuable and fire-resilient trees, such as giant ponderosas in the east Cascade slope. After 1910, fire suppression became the norm for forest management, largely in response to catastrophic fires that tore through the landscape and claimed many human lives. This meant putting out any and all forest fires as quickly as possible. More recently, scientists and forest managers have reconsidered this strategy of excluding all fire. ... ”  Read more from the Cool Green Science blog here:  Trees tell us much about fire:  What will we do about it?

Wire cages and hard work help prevent extinction of rare native plant:  “Biologists from three government natural resource agencies banded together this summer in an unusual effort to help preserve a species under threat of extinction. They lugged materials to build wire cages into the rough terrain of the remote Lassics mountains near the border of Humboldt and Trinity counties in an effort to protect their target. However, these cages were not built to trap animals; they were constructed to keep animals out.  The barren, green serpentine slopes of Mount Lassic, located in a seldom-visited part of Six Rivers National Forest, are home to one of California’s rarest plants: the Lassics lupine (Lupinus constancei). Lassics lupine is a short plant in the pea family that has bright rose-pink flowers. Only approximately 450 adult Lassics lupine plants were observed during 2017 monitoring of the species conducted by the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with assistance from CDFW. ... ”  Read more from the CDFW here:  Wire cages and hard work help prevent extinction of rare native plant

Partnership with state-run Nimbus Hatchery helps correct wayward 2017 fall-run Chinook salmon that strayed off course when they returned to spawn: “California may have experienced record rainfalls this past winter, but negative impacts due to the unprecedented five-year statewide drought continue for Chinook salmon produced at the Coleman National Fish Hatchery.  In a unique partnership that hasn’t been utilized in 40 years, the state of California has stepped in to help out.  The Coleman hatchery, located in Anderson, California is the only federally operated fish hatchery in the state with an annual production of 12 million fall-run salmon smolts that are typically released into nearby Battle Creek each spring. This allows them to complete the imprinting cycle during their outmigration to the ocean. ... ”  Read more from the US FWS here:  Partnership with state-run Nimbus Hatchery helps correct wayward 2017 fall-run Chinook salmon that strayed off course when they returned to spawn

Scripps Oceanography Receives $3 million NOAA Grant to Help Decisionmakers Prepare for Hazards and Extreme Events: “A climate research program led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, along with partners at Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nev., that has spent more than 15 years understanding climate risks will receive a new five-year award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to improve the ability of decisionmakers in California and Nevada to prepare and plan for hazards and extreme events.  NOAA’s Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program recently granted the awards to four research institutions in Arizona/New Mexico and California/Nevada. A total $7.5 million was awarded, and Scripps Oceanography will receive an estimated $3 million over the next five years for work in the California/Nevada region. … ”  Read more from Scripps Oceanography here:  Scripps Oceanography Receives $3 million NOAA Grant to Help Decisionmakers Prepare for Hazards and Extreme Events

Eyes on the coast:  Video cameras help forecast climate change:  “Coastal communities count on beaches for recreation and for protection from large waves, but beaches are vulnerable to threats such as erosion by storms and flooding. Whether beaches grow, shrink, or even disappear depends in part on what happens just offshore. How do features like shifting sandbars affect waves, currents, and the movement of sand from the beach to offshore and back?  If we understand these processes well enough, scientists can include them in computer models of coastal change that can be used to forecast, for example, how the shoreline will react to severe storms and how it could change over years, decades, or even centuries. Coastal communities can use these forecasts to plan for storms, sea-level rise, changes in sand supply, and other threats.  “When a storm is on the way, it’s really powerful to be able to say: Here’s how the water and sand will move,” says Shawn Harrison, a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) postdoctoral oceanographer. … ”  Read more from the USGS here:  Eyes on the coast:  Video cameras help forecast climate change

Technology week: Exploring the wide range of technologies NOAA uses in its mission:  “Advancements in technology improve how our scientists collect data, which in turn, helps us make the most informed conservation and management decisions. Join us for #TechnologyWeek (November 6-10, 2017), as we take a closer look at how NOAA scientists use technology to better manage our fisheries, collect data, study endangered species, and explore the vast ocean. … ”  Read more here:  Technology week: Exploring the wide range of technologies NOAA uses in its mission

Maven's XKCD Comic Pick of the Week …

 

Daily emailsSign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post!

Sign up for daily emails and get all the Notebook's aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. Breaking news alerts, too. Sign me up!


About Science News and Reports: This weekly feature, posted every Thursday, is a collection of the latest scientific research and reports with a focus on relevant issues to the Delta and to California water, although other issues such as climate change are sometimes included. Do you have an item to be included here? Submissions of relevant research and other materials is welcome. Email Maven

(Visited 162 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply