DAILY DIGEST: Kern County Water Agency, Castaic Lake Water Agency vote to support Water Fix; Vast majority of 710,000 salmon, trout survive wine country fires; California’s wildfires: Why have they been so destructive?; The challenge of preserving California’s coastal legacy; and more …

In California water news today, Kern County Water Agency opts to support Brown’s Water Fix; Kern County agency votes to help fund Delta water delivery system; Castaic Lake Water Agency backs Delta tunnels plan; Vast majority of 710,000 salmon, trout survive wine country fires; California’s wildfires: Why have they been so destructive?; Coastal protection on the edge: The challenge of preserving California’s legacy; and more …

In the news today …

Kern County Water Agency opts to support Brown’s Water Fix: “The Kern County Water Agency has voted to participate in the California WaterFix project, potentially saving one of Gov. Jerry Brown’s two legacy projects: the Delta tunnels.  California WaterFix would upgrade the state’s outdated water system and maintain a reliable source of water for 25 million Californians and more than three million acres of farmland in the Bay Area, Central Valley and Southern California, according to a news release issued by California Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird. … ”  Read more from the Bakersfield Californian here:  Kern County Water Agency opts to support Brown’s Water Fix

Kern County agency votes to help fund Delta water delivery system:  “In a small step forward for California WaterFix, a major San Joaquin Valley irrigation district on Thursday tentatively endorsed a partial investment in the water-delivery project.  With virtually no discussion, the board of the Kern County Water Agency approved a letter to the state saying that the agency was interested in pursuing a 6.5% share in the $17-billion project, which after a decade of planning is going through a crucial funding stage. ... ”  Read more from the LA Times here:  Kern County agency votes to help fund Delta water delivery system

Castaic Lake Water Agency backs Delta tunnels plan:  “Local water officials have endorsed a plan to fix the system which delivers water to the Santa Clarita Valley from Northern California at a cost to mom-and-pop SCV ratepayer of $20 a month.  The project hammered out by state officials these past 10 years to repair the water conveyance system is called the California WaterFix. It used to be called the Bay Delta Conservation Project.  Members of the Castaic Lake Water Agency board unanimously approved a recommendation Wednesday to back the WaterFix project which calls for an extensive overhaul of the water delivery system. ... ”  Read more from The Signal here:  Castaic Lake Water Agency backs Delta tunnels plan

Vast majority of 710,000 salmon, trout survive wine country fires:  “The vast majority of 710,000 salmon and trout — including the state fish, the golden trout — and 100,000 eggs at two state hatcheries survived this week’s wildfires in Sonoma and Napa counties, according to the state Department of Fish and Wildlife.  Silverado Fisheries Base, located in Napa along the Silverado Trail, lost power for 24 to 48 hours, leaving some 200,000 fish without fresh water, aeration or food after staff was evacuated Monday. But an official said Thursday that only “minimal losses” were incurred. … ”  Read more from SF Gate here:  Vast majority of 710,000 salmon, trout survive wine country fires

California’s wildfires: Why have they been so destructive?  “Intense, fast-moving fires have been raging across much of California since Sunday night. The blazes have barreled through communities like freight trains, turning homes to dust in a blink and leaving at least 23 people dead. The largest of the fires are in the state’s wine country north of San Francisco.  “We’ve never seen anything like this,” said Trina Grant, 40, who grew up in California but was not prepared for the ferocity of this year’s fire season. Her parents, Arthur and Suiko Grant, died on Monday when flames consumed their home. … ”  Read more from the New York Times here:  California’s wildfires: Why have they been so destructive?

Coastal protection on the edge: The challenge of preserving California’s legacy:  “The California coast is an edge. It’s the place where 1,100 miles of shoreline meets the largest ocean on the planet. Many different forces collide there, and a lot of exciting things happen. The coast is a geological edge, zippered to North America by 800 miles of the San Andreas Fault and battered by the Pacific Ocean.  It’s also a social, political, cultural, spiritual, economic and technological edge. It is where the most populous state and sixth-largest economy in the world is exposed to wind, waves, tides, El Niños, earthquakes and tsunamis. These forces made California’s coastline rugged, beautiful and beckoning.  But the natural beauty that has drawn so many to the edge of the Golden State has been seriously impacted by human actions. ... ”  Read mroe from EcoWatch here: Coastal protection on the edge: The challenge of preserving California’s legacy

These food and beverage companies are leading on conservation:  “After a punishing five-year drought in California that damaged harvests, caused job losses among farm workers and sent food manufacturers scrambling for commodities, many companies learned firsthand just how much of a business risk water scarcity can be.  The food and beverage industry is particularly dependent on water – indeed, agriculture uses 70 percent of the Earth’s freshwater supplies. In California, whose farms produce more than half of the nation’s fruits and vegetables, that use stretches to 80 percent. … ” Read more from Water Deeply here:  These food and beverage companies are leading on conservation

California mobile home park residents face barriers to clean water:  “Many of the more than one million Californians who live in mobile home parks drink water that is more polluted and more likely to be cut off than residents who get water from other municipal utilities, according to the most detailed research to date on water access in California trailer parks.  Water service and quality in mobile home parks is “terribly neglected,” according to Greg Pierce, a researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles and lead author of the study, which was published on October 4 in the journal Environmental Justice.  “The story is that there is a pretty consistent neglect by the manager operating the system, either not paying the bills or not monitoring the quality,” Pierce told Circle of Blue. “It’s the larger issue of the park being owned by a person who is not doing much to maintain the system.” ... ”  Read more from Circle of Blue here:  California mobile home park residents face barriers to clean water

In commentary today …

Santa Clara Valley Water District should join the Cal Water Fix project, say Tarkan Maner, Mike Mahon, and Mike Mielke:  They write, “California is the sixth largest economy in the world, and Silicon Valley is a primary driver of our state’s job creation and growth. Yet our success is at risk unless we move to protect our water supply.  That’s why we are urging the Santa Clara Valley Water District help secure our water supplies now and well into the future by supporting California WaterFix, which will deliver water through modern pipelines.  While we might expect our innovative state to have state-of-the-art infrastructure for delivering one of our most precious resources – drinking water – that is not the case.  At least not yet. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here:  Santa Clara Valley Water District should join the Cal Water Fix project

Where to now on LA water, Mr. Mayor? asks the LA Times:  They write, “After Tuesday’s vote by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California to participate in a giant water delivery project more than 300 miles to the north, Los Angeles is left to wonder: Are we all in on the delta tunnels and their $17 billion price tag ($4.3 billion for Southern California)? Are we all out? Does Mayor Eric Garcetti have a better alternative, and will he try to stop the tunnels project from moving forward?  You couldn’t tell from the votes cast by Garcetti’s five appointees to the 38-member MWD board. They split 3-2, with the majority opposed. … ” Read more from the LA Times here: Where to now on LA water, Mr. Mayor? asks the LA Times

RELATED: Letters to the editor of the LA Times on the Delta tunnels

Californians should cherish farms, not go to war against them, says Paul Wenger: You wouldn’t think I’d need to say this in a state that has proudly led the nation in agricultural production for 70-plus years, but I guess I need to: California agriculture represents a crucial asset to this state, economically and environmentally. … Farming is not the “old economy.” It’s the “always economy.” People need to eat. California can provide farm products of higher quality in greater volumes with less environmental impact than can farms anywhere in the world. That ability is something that should be cherished and protected. Why do people want to destroy it? ... ”  Read more from the Sacramento Bee here:  Californians should cherish farms, not go to war against them

Why San Diego’s desalination project should be replicated: Barbara Boxer writes,In December 2015, during California’s most recent drought, Poseidon Water opened a seawater desalination facility in Carlsbad which has since produced over 22 billion gallons of high-quality, drought-proof drinking water for San Diego County.  As a United States senator, much of my work included finding innovative solutions to address climate change which would reduce Californian’s pain in the face of predicted droughts. As such, I supported the Carlsbad project and it pleases me that such a huge majority of Californians support seawater desalination as well. ... ” Read more from the San Diego Union Tribune here:  Why San Diego’s desalination project should be replicated

In regional news and commentary today …

Zone 7 manager Jill Duerig to retire:  “Jill Duerig will be retiring next year as General manager of Zone 7 Water Agency.  A firm date has not been set, because Duerig wants to give the Zone 7 board time to choose a successor. However, she plans to leave in the first half of next year.  Although the Zone 7 board last week conferred with Duerig last week in closed session, no action was taken at that time. ... ”  Read more from the Livermore Independent here:  Zone 7 manager Jill Duerig to retire

Tuolumne River Management Plan released by irrigation districts:  “The Modesto and Turlock Irrigation District Boards took steps to file the final applications for the Don Pedro and La Grange projects with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).  The boards authorized their general managers to file the Amended Final License Application and the Final License Application for the projects. The districts have been working with the public and various agencies to identify how the projects would impact environmental resources. … ”  Read more from the Central Valley Business Journal here:  Tuolumne River Management Plan released by irrigation districts

Modesto to pay $165,000 fine for releasing wastewater into river:  “Modesto has agreed to pay the state a $165,000 fine for releasing about 755 million gallons of partially treated waste water into the San Joaquin River in March in violation of its discharge permit.  The city released the waste water to protect one of its treatment plants that had reached capacity. The city’s sewer system had been overwhelmed by last winter’s heavy rains and from Tuolumne River water pouring into the system after an antiquated section of a major sewer line along the river had collapsed. … ”  Read more from the Modesto Bee here:  Modesto to pay $165,000 fine for releasing wastewater into river

Senator Dianne Feinstein lends support to Huntington Beach desalination:  “As supporters and opponents of a proposed Huntington Beach desalination project gear up for a key meeting before the State Lands Commission, U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein has weighed in.  In a letter to the Commission, the senior senator from California gave her endorsement to the Poseidon Water project, saying it would ” provide potable water to meet documented demand within Orange County.”  Feinstein joins a long list of state political and water officials leaders, including former Senate colleague Barbara Boxer, in support of the proposed $1 billion plant to be built by Poseidon Water to provide 50 million gallons per day or enough for 400,000 residents. … ”  Read more from the OC Register here:  Senator Dianne Feinstein lends support to Huntington Beach desalination

Friday flight over Oroville …

Concrete forms for sidewalls are erected and roller-compacted concrete (RCC) continues to fill the erosion area. A concrete curing compound is rolled onto the newly formed structural walls, and more rebar walls are swung into place on the upper chute.

Also on Maven’s Notebook today …

Sign up for daily email service and you’ll never miss a post …

Daily emailsSign up for free daily email service and you’ll get all the Notebook’s aggregated and original water news content delivered to your email box by 9AM. And with breaking news alerts, you’ll always be one of the first to know …


About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

 

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: