WEEKLY DIGEST for August 6 through 11

A list of posts published on Maven’s Notebook this week …

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This week’s featured articles …

CA WATER POLICY CONFERENCE: Salty buildup: The threat to California’s water

Salinity is a slow-moving but critical problem.  It is most challenging in regions that have constrained drainage; it can be exacerbated when imported water brings salts into the basin; imported food and other raw materials can add to the problem.

An evaporation pond in Kings County; Photo by DWR

If salts are not properly managed, it can pose a threat to human health as well as wildlife, and ruin once-productive agricultural lands.

Salinity is a significant challenge in with approximately 4.5 million acres of irrigated cropland, primarily on the West Side of the San Joaquin Valley, are affected by saline soils or saline irrigation water. Continued irrigation of these soils will invariably lead to soil salinization unless mitigated by appropriate management.  But although the problem is well-known and well-studied, effective and viable solutions remain elusive.

At the California Water Policy Conference, held earlier this year in San Diego, the issue was a subject of a panel discussion with Hal Candee, an attorney with Altshuler Berzon; Daniel Cozad, Executive Director of the Central Valley Salinity Coalition; Debi Ores, staff attorney and legislative advocate with the Community Water Center; and Hope Smythe, Executive Officer at the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board.  The panel was moderated by Larry McKenney, Executive Counsel with the Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority.

Click here to read this article.

DPR scientists tackling troubling urban pesticide runoff

From the Department of Pesticide Regulation:

Agricultural pesticide runoff grabs headlines, but did you know that urban pesticide use can also pollute California creeks and rivers?

Determining the extent of the pollution has been the focus of recent studies by scientists at the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR). They’ve found several pesticides at levels toxic to aquatic invertebrates in Northern and Southern California watersheds fed by urban runoff. These organisms play a critical role in the food chain so are important to broader ecosystems.

Two of the most commonly detected pesticides are pyrethroids and fipronil.

Click here to read this article.

In water news this week from around the web …

WEEKEND DAILY DIGEST: Oroville Dam: Six months after disaster, a race to repair; In San Francisco, a forgotten wetland resurfaces in new art installation; In court battle over groundwater rights, Agua Caliente’s leader demands water treatment; and more … In California water news this weekend, Oroville Dam: Six months after disaster, a race to repair; Levee repairs underway as many more are needed; PG&E wants people to stay off of its flumes; San Francisco: Beneath the pavement: A forgotten wetland resurfaces in new art installation; Indian Wells Valley Groundwater Authority’s Technical Advisory Committee prioritizes studies to import water to IWV; Indian Wells Valley Water 101: Grab a notepad because this will be on the test, says the Ridgecrest Independent; Orange County: Agencies develop plan to take advantage of snow levels and refill OC Basin; Metropolitan Water District has paid almost $88 million to get out of risky swap deals; In court battle over groundwater rights, tribe’s leader demands water treatment; Studying dust around the Salton Sea, scientists find initial answers; Pacific Ocean still reeling from several rough years; and are markets an easy solution for groundwater problems? Michael Kiparsky and Nell Green Nylen weigh in.

MONDAY: One of the largest dam removals in California history inches forward; Toxic waste from pot farms alarms experts; A decades-long public land battle continues in the California desert; and more …  In California water news today, One of the largest dam removals in California history inches forward; Toxic waste from pot farms alarms experts; California duck population down after historic drought; $1 billion worth of claims for Oroville Dam damages filed with the State of California; From spectacular vistas to the pits: A decades-long public land battle continues in the California desert; The science of desert water; Q&A with Leon Szeptycki: Climate change and water in the West; Second garbage patch the size of Texas discovered in the Pacific Ocean; and more …

TUESDAY: Cutoff wall but no chute this year for Oroville Dam; Local entities oppose funding sources for drinking water bill; ACWA study highlights new approaches to water storage; Plan for San Joaquin Valley reservoir to recharge groundwater draws concern; and more …  In California water news today, Cutoff wall but no chute this year for Oroville Dam; Local entities oppose funding sources for drinking water bill; ACWA study highlights new approaches to water storage; Plan for San Joaquin Valley reservoir to recharge groundwater draws concern; From toilet water to drinking water; California’s largest water supplier says federal water bill goes too far; and more …

WEDNESDAYTen states back California agencies in fight with tribe over groundwater; Federal report sees human-caused changes to California’s climate; Seawalls pose greater risks with higher ocean levels; and more …  In California water news today, Ten states back California agencies in fight with tribe over groundwater; States ask High Court to define ‘fractured’ groundwater rights; Federal report sees human-caused changes to California’s climate; Seawalls pose greater risks with higher ocean levels; Prep work for Oroville spillway nearly complete; No snow left? Aerial survey shows 8% still remains in the San Joaquin watershed; and more …

THURSDAY: Butte County files lawsuit over twin tunnels project; Enviros say proposed cannabis grow rules fail to protect wildlife; FEMA pays almost $23 million towards Oroville Dam crisis; NW farmers urge Trump administration to sidestep salmon protection rules; and more …  In California water news today, Butte County files lawsuit over twin tunnels project; Environmentalists say proposed cannabis grow rules fail to protect wildlife; Panel weighed Oroville Spillway failure in 2014 – and called it unlikely; Spillway reconstruction: Review board concerned about temporary concrete; Trump administration sends payout for Oroville Dam crisis. Could more be on the way?; FEMA pays almost $23 million toward Oroville Dam spillway crisis costs; Oroville Dam’s green spot: Innocent pool or big problem?; California’s plan to tackle a carcinogen widespread in water; Northwest farmers urge Trump administration to sidestep salmon protection rules; and more …

FRIDAY: Congressman questions plan to drain Lake Oroville for project; How much SoCal’s water bills could rise due to the Delta tunnels; The regulatory state versus a California farmer; A legal battle in Idaho portends future conflicts over water; and more … In California water news today, Congressman questions plan to drain Lake Oroville for project; Southern Californians, here’s how much your water bill could rise due to the Delta tunnels; Butte County Board of Supervisors files lawsuit against DWR; Parks and water bond linked to housing deal at California capital; Plowed under: The regulatory state versus a California farmer; A legal battle in Idaho portends future conflicts over water; and more …

News worth noting this week …

Other news items …

Weekly features …

Announcements this week …

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