DAILY DIGEST, weekend edition: How does changing climate bring more extreme events?; Flood insurance rates could rise for hundreds of thousands of homeowners under proposal; Siskiyou County Supervisors wary of effort to model Shasta River hydrology; and more …

In California water news this weekend, How does changing climate bring more extreme events?; Flood insurance rates could rise for hundreds of thousands of homeowners under proposal; Drone video shows progress on spillway repair; Siskiyou County Supervisors wary of effort to model Shasta River hydrology; Toxic algae spurs no-swim warning in East Bay community; Pajaro Valley water kicks off next phase of basin plan; Three years after receiving new well, Tulare County still suffering from water shortage; Inyo County in process of ‘condemning’ landfill sites, reclaiming land from DWP; Diamond Valley back to being a jewel of a lake; and more …

In the news this weekend …

How does changing climate bring more extreme events?  “A rapidly-emerging area of scientific study is “event attribution” which seeks to understand the relationships between extreme weather and climate events and climate change. Researchers are identifying the physical processes that are causing an intensification of weather and climate phenomena, which in turn has the potential to improve the prediction of extreme events. The editors of a new book, just published by the American Geophysical Union, answer some questions about weather and climate extremes, and explain technological developments in this field that are improving forecasting and prediction. … ”  Read more from EOS here:  How does changing climate bring more extreme events?

Flood insurance rates could rise for hundreds of thousands of homeowners under proposal:  “Congress is considering sweeping changes to the debt-laden National Flood Insurance Program that could jack up flood insurance rates for hundreds of thousands of homeowners under a bill that a Florida real estate group called “devastating.”  The proposal, part of a flood-insurance package with a Sept. 30 deadline, could prove costly to homeowners in flood-prone regions ranging from Florida to Texas to California’s Central Valley. It would primarily affect homeowners with low “grandfathered” rates based on flood maps that have changed since they purchased their homes. ... ”  Read more from the Fresno Bee here:  Flood insurance rates could rise for hundreds of thousands of homeowners under proposal

Drone video shows progress on spillway repair: Aerial drone footage from the state Department of Water Resources reveals progress on the Oroville Dam this week.  Shot July 11, the video shows concrete being pumped between the stay-in-place forms. It is part of a new foundation and drainage system for the Lake Oroville control spillway. The clips also highlight demolition and rock cleaning on the emergency spillway. … ”  Read more from the San Jose Mercury Record here:  Drone video shows progress on spillway repair

In commentary this weekend …

Stop the legislative games with Cadiz water project, says John HakelHe writes, “Over the Independence Day holiday, a member of the California Legislature, using the universally reviled “gut and amend” process, introduced Assembly Bill 1000, a bill with a malicious, single purpose: derail the construction of the Cadiz Water Project, a project fully certified under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) that will add a new, sustainable water supply to Southern California.  A reliable water supply is essential to the health of our economy and the prosperity of our communities. Yet, AB1000 targets a project that could offer one by attempting to override long-existing law governing how we move water in California. It specifically hinders the conveyance of water supplies only near the Cadiz project — a completely inappropriate and harmful use of the legislative process. … ”  Read more from the San Bernardino Sun here:  Stop the legislative games with Cadiz water project

In regional news and commentary this weekend …

Siskiyou County Supervisors wary of effort to model Shasta River hydrology:  “The State Water Resources Control Board is working toward the creation of a hydrology model for the Shasta River, spurring concerns from the Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday.  Representatives from the SWRCB visited the board of supervisors on Tuesday to discuss the proposed hydrology model, which is a part of the California Water Action Plan. The plan was released in 2014 and updated in 2016, and acts as a guiding document in efforts to enhance the state’s water supply reliability, restore damaged ecosystems, and improve water infrastructure, according to Daniel Worth of the SWRCB’s Division of Water Rights.  … ”  Read more from the Siskiyou Daily News here:  Siskiyou County Supervisors wary of effort to model Shasta River hydrology

Toxic algae spurs no-swim warning in East Bay community:  “Toxic blue-green algae is back this year, triggering a no-swim warning on some waterways in the southern part of this water-oriented community.  Responding to public complaints, Contra Costa County environmental health inspectors tested waterways in several places around Discovery Bay and found algae was toxic in three spots along southern Newport and Windward drives, officials confirmed Friday.  Health officials advise people not swim in or touch the waters in those areas and keep pets and livestock away from the water, said Victoria Balladares, a spokeswoman for the county Department of Health Services. ... ” Read more from the East Bay Times here:  Toxic algae spurs no-swim warning in East Bay community

Pajaro Valley water kicks off next phase of basin plan:  “A standing-room-only crowd greeted the Board of Directors as the Pajaro Valley Water Management Agency introduced its plan Monday to address the Valley’s critically overdrafted groundwater basin with local resources and become compliant before the state’s 2040 Sustainable Groundwater Management Act mandate.  “We’re in the early stages of implementing our Basin Management Plan,” PV Water Board Chair Rosemarie Imazio told the crowd during the meeting at the Watsonville Civic Plaza. “That’s why it’s so important to hear from you.” … ”  Read more from the Register-Pajaronian here:  Pajaro Valley water kicks off next phase of basin plan

Three years after receiving new well, Tulare County still suffering from water shortage:  “Heather Kemper said her family goes 20 hours a day without water– sometimes it’s a trickle. They will wait until early morning to do laundry, flush the toilet, or shower and there’s not enough water for the swamp coolers.  But Heather said they are not the only ones who suffer in Seville, in Tulare County.  “I mean this is an emergency situation, we’re doing without water a lot, and it’s not easy. We have elderly, disabled, fieldworker’s, who are out there 12 hours a day, come home, and they can’t shower.” … ”  Read more from ABC 30 here:  Three years after receiving new well, Tulare County still suffering from water shortage

Inyo County in process of ‘condemning’ landfill sites, reclaiming land from DWP: In what could be described as one of the gutsiest local moves, at least in the past couple of years, Inyo County is in the process of claiming eminent domain on 267.89 acres of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power land in Bishop, Lone Pine and Independence. The parcels make up Inyo’s landfill sites.  According to County Counsel Marshall Rudolph, the process began last March when the County sent the department notice of its intent, along with an invitation to send an appraiser to determine the value of the land with Inyo’s own appraiser.  ... ”  Read more from the Sierra Wave here:  Inyo County in process of ‘condemning’ landfill sites, reclaiming land from DWP

Diamond Valley back to being a jewel of a lake:  “Two years ago, the amount of water in the massive Diamond Valley Lake was … well, not so massive.  Able to hold 810,000 acre-feet of water, an extended drought had dropped storage at the reservoir near Hemet to 299,638 acre-feet in March 2016 — and it was that high due to conservation efforts.  The water level dropped so low, private fishing boats were banned for 13 months. Even after extending the marina’s long boat ramp, it ended at dirt, not water. Islands and rock piles began popping out of the lake’s surface. ... ”  Read more from the Riverside Press-Enterprise here:  Diamond Valley back to being a jewel of a lake

Along the Colorado River …

Stabilizing Lake Mead levels a priority amongst stakeholders:  “The five participants in a historic effort to help stabilize Lake Mead water levels made their agreement formal at a signing ceremony hosted by the Arizona Department of Water Resources.  As part of the $6 million partnership agreement with the Bureau of Reclamation, the State of Arizona, the City of Phoenix and the Walton Family Foundation, Inc., The Gila River Indian Community will forego delivery of 40,000 acre-feet of its 2017 Colorado River allocation.  The tribe will leave that water in Lake Mead. It will be saved in the Colorado River system rather than be tied to any defined use. ... ”  Read more from Prescott News here:  Stabilizing Lake Mead levels a priority amongst stakeholders

And lastly …

Overturned truck of ‘slime eels’ transforms Oregon road into highway of nightmares:  “Whatever you call them – slime eels, hagfish, nightmare fuel – an Oregon highway was drenched with 7,500 pounds of the sea creatures after a five-vehicle collision Thursday.  Hagfish secrete sticky ooze when they’re attacked, startled or, apparently, catapulted from a truck into oncoming traffic.  The 3.4 tons of cargo was ultimately bound for South Korea, where the fish are a delicacy, the Oregonian reported. One person was injured in the accident on Highway 101 on the central Oregon coast. … ” Read more from the San Jose Mercury News here:  Overturned truck of ‘slime eels’ transforms Oregon road into highway of nightmares

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About the Daily Digest: The Daily Digest is a collection of selected news articles, commentaries and editorials appearing in the mainstream press. Items are generally selected to follow the focus of the Notebook blog. The Daily Digest is published every weekday with a weekend edition posting on Sundays.

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