SCIENCE NEWS: Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate change; Hell or high water: what floods mean for wildlife; Legends of the lost reservoirs; and more …

Neural Connections In the Human Brain

In science news this week: Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate change; Hell or high water: what floods mean for wildlife; Rainbow trout return to Orinda after a half century away; Legends of the lost reservoirs; Global growth of ecological, environmental citizen science is fueled by new technology; and Graphene sieve turns seawater into drinking water

Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate change:  ““Resilience” is a buzzword often used in scientific literature to describe how animals, plants and landscapes can persist under climate change. It’s typically considered a good quality, suggesting that those with resilience can withstand or adapt as the climate continues to change.  But when it comes to actually figuring out what makes a species or an entire ecosystem resilient ― and how to promote that through restoration or management ― there is a lack of consensus in the scientific community.  A new paper by the University of Washington and NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center aims to provide clarity among scientists, resource managers and planners on what ecological resilience means and how it can be achieved. ... ”  Read more from the University of Washington here:  Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate change

Hell or high water: what floods mean for wildlife:  “Floods have been very much in the news and on the minds of Californians this year, from the mass evacuations downstream of the Oroville Dam to the flooding of San Jose. While floods make headlines for their toll on homes and businesses, their impact on wildlife and the greater ecosystem can go overlooked. Flooding can be a boon or a burden to fish populations, depending on its magnitude and timing. Flood waters can create important fish habitat where they are allowed to fan out in floodplains. As demonstrated by the Nigiri Project, juvenile salmon grow larger when they can rear in floodplains thanks to the slightly warmer water and abundant food supply. Fish benefit when the rivers run high enough to inundate large floodplains like Sutter Bypass and Yolo Bypass, although fish can also get stranded once flood waters recede. ... ”  Read more from the FishBio blog here:  Hell or high water: what floods mean for wildlife

Rainbow trout return to Orinda after a half century away:  “It’s not unusual for a retired fisheries biologist to get an email with a fish picture, but the photo of a rainbow trout that Orinda resident Brian Waters received from the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) last fall was different. It was visual proof of the more than 100 trout that had been observed in the southern reach of San Pablo Creek after an absence of at least half a century, and it sent Waters into a fit of fist-pumping elation.  … ” Read more from Bay Nature here:  Rainbow trout return to Orinda after a half century away

Legends of the lost reservoirs:  “Tucked away in a laboratory in University of Cincinnati’s Braunstein Hall are tubes of rock and dirt that quietly tell a story — a story that looks back on ancient society’s early water conservation. UC researchers hope the story will aid in the future preservation of our planet’s most precious resource.  In an effort to help manage the world’s water supply more efficiently, an interdisciplinary team of University of Cincinnati researchers from the departments of anthropology, geography and geology have climbed through rainforests, dug deep under arid deserts and collaborated with scientists around the world to look at how ancient humans manipulated their environment to manage water. ... ”  Read more from Science Daily here:  Legends of the lost reservoirs

Global growth of ecological, environmental citizen science is fueled by new technology:  “Scientists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and the Natural History Museum, London have revealed the diversity of ecological and environmental citizen science for the first time and showed that the changing face of citizen science around the world is being fuelled by advances in new technology.  The study, the first of its kind to quantitatively explore the diverse range of approaches to ecological and environmental research carried out by volunteers, shows that citizen science is on the rise due to the availability and innovative use of online databases, digital cameras and smartphones. … ”  Read more from Science Daily here:  Global growth of ecological, environmental citizen science is fueled by new technology

Graphene sieve turns seawater into drinking water:  “Graphene-oxide membranes have attracted considerable attention as promising candidates for new filtration technologies. Now the much sought-after development of making membranes capable of sieving common salts has been achieved.  New research demonstrates the real-world potential of providing clean drinking water for millions of people who struggle to access adequate clean water sources.  The new findings from a group of scientists at The University of Manchester were published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Previously graphene-oxide membranes have shown exciting potential for gas separation and water filtration. … ”  Read more from Science Daily here:  Graphene sieve turns seawater into drinking water

Maven’s XKCD Comic Pick of the Week …

 

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About Science News and Reports: This weekly feature, posted every Thursday, is a collection of the latest scientific research and reports with a focus on relevant issues to the Delta and to California water, although other issues such as climate change are sometimes included. Do you have an item to be included here? Submissions of relevant research and other materials is welcome. Email Maven

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